Think you have brass balls? Check this out:

1J04

Morale Officer
Aug 7, 2011
8,130
1,676
113
PACIFIC NW
#2
I still cherish life. I couldn't even watch someone do that. I ain't lying.

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Nov 10, 2010
2,415
511
113
UT
#3
Saw that, nuts as fuck. Said he passed a group around the two hour mark that were just waking up in their hanging tents. Normally takes a couple days with safety gear. That guy needs to sit back and chill out for awhile.
 

softcock

novice judgmental prick
Mar 24, 2006
732
36
28
Oregon
#6
Wow that is pretty badass, the guy is on a plateau of commitment above the normal human climber and i guessing his strength to weight ratio must be off the scale .
I bow down to him . I was pressing my low-end skills playing on a few basic climbs around Moab area with a couple short walls and castleton tower and kingfisher tower and it rung me out and I dont like it, I dont mind getting pushed to the ragged edge on a few things I used to do with no outs, But I did NOT really care for and had a hard time self-regulating the nonstop pinned-out feeling climbing gave me .
 

Cartman

Bird Dogging Expert
May 5, 2007
1,384
0
0
NunYo SoCal
#7
I was only ever a climbing gym climber. And even then, knowing I was harnessed and roped up, I would get that feeling where my body didn't want to obey my mind when I would have to, for example, deal with an overhang, or something pretty (for me anyway) crazy.

I've known many, many, trapshooters who have taken such a pounding over the years that their finger just won't pull the trigger anymore and they need to use a release trigger to trick their body/mind into obeying the command to fire. This guy overcomes all resistance. Whether it's from mental discipline or because he's wired differently, I'm impressed either way.

He tries to explain it by broadening his training with more and more difficult tasks to widen the circle of what his mind thinks possible, but it still seems like a huge breakthrough. Like climbing Everast or the four minute mile.
 

softcock

novice judgmental prick
Mar 24, 2006
732
36
28
Oregon
#8
I was only ever a climbing gym climber. And even then, knowing I was harnessed and roped up, I would get that feeling where my body didn't want to obey my mind when I would have to, for example, deal with an overhang, or something pretty (for me anyway) crazy.

I've known many, many, trapshooters who have taken such a pounding over the years that their finger just won't pull the trigger anymore and they need to use a release trigger to trick their body/mind into obeying the command to fire. This guy overcomes all resistance. Whether it's from mental discipline or because he's wired differently, I'm impressed either way.

He tries to explain it by broadening his training with more and more difficult tasks to widen the circle of what his mind thinks possible, but it still seems like a huge breakthrough. Like climbing Everast or the four minute mile.
-
This guy, this badass climb, It not a breakthrough for this sport . It is a Pinnacle moment forsure in this sport . It really more of just pure privilege . if your your running in that circle, hanging with, witnessing, or just appreciation of , the rare, right guy born with the muscle tissue and correct wiring to step-up and take it. Hopefully he will last a while, be on top of his game, make his mark and records and get out . Most of them die to early .
.
 
Sep 7, 2011
834
66
28
37
Golden CO
#14
Its amazing. Climbing 5.13d is more than 2 full grades above my hardest leads I ever did (5.11b). He can climb harder and doing that grade so far off the deck ropeless is completely off the hook.
I do think the free solo thing is nuts as I dont love anything as a sport that has a gauranteed end like that if anything goes wrong. I understand taking risks and even accepting risk of death, such as our Mil and LEO folks here or as a dad if I were able to take a bullet and save my kid.
I love the discussion about the power of the human mind. Our brains can do much much more than we let them.0 Try walking 16-20' of 1200F coals barefoot. Thats a decent place to start!
 
Likes: Frankly

TripleBull

This one goes to 11
Feb 13, 2017
1,319
744
113
#16
Its amazing. Climbing 5.13d is more than 2 full grades above my hardest leads I ever did (5.11b).
11b is a proud lead. I grew up at the time when soloing in the US was really taking off. I would typically solo something 3 or 4 grades below my onsight limit - if I liked the look of it. I once soloed a steep 5.9 with an overhanging offwidth finish and that cured me for a while.

Alex is amazing - I hope he survives his wild years.

 
Likes: Frankly
Feb 20, 2017
266
3
18
Eastern PA
#17
Saw that, nuts as fuck. Said he passed a group around the two hour mark that were just waking up in their hanging tents. Normally takes a couple days with safety gear. That guy needs to sit back and chill out for awhile.
Alex is about as chill as it gets, which is a big part of why he is able to do these climbs. He's free solo'd so many big walls in the valley (Yosemite) and around the world, and this solo has been on his plate for a few years. It's all calculated risk for him, he's done his homework. He Solo'd the Nose, mostly without a rope, then did 3 Valley big walls in under 24 hours (The Nose, Half Dome, Mt. Watkins) Free solo'd Half Dome, Free solo'd in Mexico, Portero Chico, Climbed 290 pitches in under 24 hours, Climbed 4 Zion big walls in a day. He is as laid back as it gets. He doesn't have fear or freak out under about any circumstance. If he wanted to die, it would be as easy as letting go. This is what he was put on earth to do, and if one day, after 40 years of climbing, he peels off and pancakes, he will have lived 40 or 50 of the most fun years he could have. He puts his rock shoes on and goes to work, doing what he loves most, every minute of every day.

These big climbs take 3 to 5 days, even weeks, because most other climbers have to pack a gallon of water each per day, food, clothing, gear, portaledge, sleeping bags, first aid gear, etc. He ropes up and climbs them in a casual 2.5 to 10 hours since he doesn't have the logistics of hauling 250 pounds of gear. There are elite climbers, and then there is Alex.

Valley Uprising.... it's on Netflix, a very fun documentary on Yosemite climbing, and totally worth watching. I got to watch it in Yosemite, with many of the climbers featured in it, damn that was fun.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hQXWnoipdFE

Scott
 
Aug 10, 2017
33
0
6
MD
#21
I love seeing when my two worlds (climbing and shooting) collide. I spend way more time climbing. Way more money on shooting.

Australia:


French Alps:
 
Feb 20, 2017
266
3
18
Eastern PA
#24
Those guys in Valley Uprising during the 60s early 70s take the phrase FN NUTS to a new level.
cool man, you watched it? I was just back in Yosemite Valley two weeks ago. Yeah, those climbers were doing what was thought to be impossible, and they were their own best chance of rescue if crap hit the fan. magical place and time for sure.

Scott
 

buffalowinter

Rick Jones MAJ, SF (Ret)
Mar 17, 2014
486
177
43
Llano, TX
#26
  • Paul Preuss (October 3, 1913) died during an attempt to make the first ascent of the North Ridge of the Mandlkogel free solo, fell a thousand feet.
  • Tobin Sorenson died (October 5, 1980) from a fall during a solo attempt of the Mount Alberta's North Face.
  • Jimmy Jewell fell to his death (October 31, 1987) from Poor Man's Peuterey (Severe) at Tremadog, North Wales. Ironically, he was using the route as a shortcut from a local pub to his climbing club hut; the route was well below his usual grade and capability.
  • Derek Hersey died (May 28, 1993) in an accident while soloing the Steck-Salathé Route free solo, on Sentinel Rock in Yosemite National Park.
  • Dwight Bishop fell (July 19, 2004; age 49) climbing alone and unroped, Wyoming, Grand Teton National Park, The Grand Traverse.
  • Jimmy Ray Forester fell (November 24, 2006; age 43) while free-soloing in El Potrero Chico, Mexico. Forester, an experienced, talented climber, failed to return to camp after setting out on The Scariest Ride in the Park, a 40-pitch 5.9 ridge route known for loose rock. He was found the next day at the base of the wall.[SUP][10][/SUP]
  • George Gardner fell to his death (July 25, 2008; age 58) while free soloing in Grand Teton National Park.[SUP][11][/SUP]
  • John Bachar died (July 5, 2009) in a free solo accident at Dike Wall near Mammoth Lakes, California.
  • Akihira Tawara died (September 13, 2011) while free solo climbing the Directissima 5.8 route on Yamnuska.
  • Michael Ybarra died (July 2012) climbing solo on The Matterhorn Peak in California's Sierra Nevada Mountains.[SUP][12][/SUP]
  • Brad Parker fell (August 2014) about 300 feet to his death while attempting to climb Matthes Crest Traverse in Yosemite, CA.[SUP][13][/SUP]
  • Andrew Barnes died (June 12, 2015; age 46) falling 50 ft (15 m) free solo climbing in New York's Shawangunk Mountains.[SUP][14][/SUP]
  • Angus Moloney died (September 27, 2015; age 22) falling 100 ft free-solo climbing from the Fifth Pinnacle above the Gregory Canyon Trail, Boulder's Open Space and Mountain Parks.
  • Some high-profile climbers have died while free soloing, including John Bachar, Derek Hersey, Vik Hendrickson, Robert Steele, Dwight Bishop, Jimmy Ray Forrester, Jimmy Jewell, Tony Wilmott, and John Taylor.
  • As a Special Forces A Detachment Team Leader of a Mountain Team, I've climbed all over the United States and the world. I would Free Climb all the time in SF...no big deal. Free soloing is just gambling. It doesn't matter how good you are, if the rock breaks or crumbles you're dead. If a rock from above falls and hits you, you're dead. Fast moving storm...dead A successful free solo is just luck. We practiced both Sport Climbing...as training...and long alpine ascents...as the mission. In alpine ascents, climbing on virgin rock/snow/ice,...you never know when you're going to hit rotten/loose rock, sandstone, bad weather, rotten ice etc. I've always seen free soloing as foolish and ultimately vain and narcissistic. It's a pet peeve of mine.
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Likes: myronman3

WATERWALKER

0311 SHELLBACK
Apr 19, 2014
500
48
28
Del Rio, TX
#27
I did a “rock package” at Bridgeport MWTC in the mid 90s. Nothing as high speed or difficult as BuffaloWinter describes, but everyday was a challenge. Your mental prep, upper body strength, gear, etc has to be at the top of its game. I remember climbing w/ banged up fingers that never had a chance to heal & it sucked. Agreed on a successful climb involving lots of luck. Great sport if you’ve got the talent / stomach for it.
 

demolitionman

Sergeant of the Hide
Feb 26, 2013
981
198
43
Ohio
#29
Any of you guys ever climbed Index Washington? For some reason of all the places I've climbed that place gave me goosebumps. It's no Yosemite or Squamish but there's lots of good history there and it's pretty unique.
 

Frankly

En Newbieated
Jan 27, 2018
247
162
43
Spencerport, NY
frankpetronio.com
#31
Spent a few weeks in Yosemite, also the Gunks, Little Cottonwood, Tetons... until a 65’ fall in 1983 when a 9’ section of the wall pulled off. Left a few marks but cured the itch.

Yeah that scissorleg twitching yet you push through and survive when you do moves you really aren’t capable of is a great feeling. After lol

Watch the Netflix movie, that kid is great.
 

sandwarrior

Gunny Sergeant
Apr 21, 2007
4,077
133
63
in yooperland
#32
That is about as stupid as anything I've ever seen. No matter how good you think you are, or really are. One mistake and someone else is cleaning up your mess.

Safety gear is there for a reason. Use it! It's akin to me of not wearing safety chaps while cutting, a hard hat on a hard hat job. "I'm smarter" mentality, "It won't happen to me because I know how to dodge the pitfalls." Famous last words of dead daredevils.
 
Mar 24, 2017
378
101
43
Wisconny
#35
meh.....selfish dude. what about the people who are going to have to scrap his remains up?

if you are going to get yourself killed, do it to protect someone else, or in service to your country. the teachers that put themselves between the shooters and their students. soldiers and sailers and airmen and marines. that impresses me.

this guy will be a grease stain before too long.
 
#36
Nat Geo also published findings from Medical Research that shows an infection of Toxoplasmosis (transmitted by cats) with cysts, can induce a total lack of fear. Honnold is absolutely fearless. It is even remarked upon by fellow climbers, at near the same ability (same league as it were). Google the subject for some surprising reading, and then consider some of the people you met in extremely high stress situations (combat or other extremely dangerous situations, if there was someone who was absolutely fearless, tht might be why). Review the literature. There is an abundance of information.