ROMAN EMPIRE

WATERWALKER

0311 SHELLBACK
Apr 19, 2014
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Deep in the Lone Star
#1
I read a lot of books on deployment. I read a ton of books having to do w/ the Roman Legions. I became fascinated w/ them because they’re the original 03s. I developed a special interest in Julius Caesar.

I almost never look at Netflix. A long story made short is that my wife was looking through the menu & I just happened to see a program called ROMAN EMPIRE which peaked my curiosity. Y’all need to watch this program. Season One is good but Season Two is really badass.

Edit: Grammar error.
 
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Likes: Culpeper
Jul 6, 2010
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Denver, CO
#2
I enjoyed it a lot. If you are digging on Rome and Julius Ceasar and that era check out Dan Carlin's Hardcore History podcast "The Celtic Holocost" about Ceasar's campaign against the Goths. "death throes of the republic" was also very interesting. Hell, his stuff on Ghengis Khan and WW1 blew my mind too.
 
Likes: Culpeper
Dec 20, 2017
877
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#4
I started on your recommendation. 1st season is proving difficult to hold my attention. I'll try to make it to season 2. I do the format.
 

Strykervet

Resident Phoenix Eye and Dim Mak Instructor
Jun 5, 2011
2,667
833
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Pierce County, WA
#5
I took a class on it in college. Exact same class, classroom and teachers as Amanda Knox actually, just the next quarter. Learned a lot. Best Roman books were the ones Livy wrote... Almost 2000 years ago. Livy was the OG blogger. Virgil's Aeneid is also awesome. There are two creation myths for Rome, one is Romulus and Remus and the second takes place at the end of the Trojan war. "Pious Aeneas" won favor of some of the gods and so was spared on evacuation of Troy. He carried his grandfather on his back and his grandfather carried the household god on his back (you've probably seen it in art). Aeneas is mentioned in the movie "Troy" right near the end, I thought it was a cool addition. There's another great Roman writer, VERY critical of Nero despite being born after. Just can't think of his name right now. Not a big fan of the sex writer but he was damn popular at the time, Ovid? I think that's his name. Virgil is much better. Aeneid is easily in the top ten best literary works of all time and it's a poem but reads like a book. 2000 years later and you can still see it in your head like you're there.

All the old Roman literature can probably be had for free and I know libraries have 'em but it's something you usually have to ask to be ordered. The shit Nero did is absolutely beyond comprehension, his "Domus Aureous" or "house of gold". It took up 1/3rd of Rome and you had to go around it, it was in the center. It included an African menagerie which was so big you couldn't see the opposite sides. The colosseum was built on the old foundations. In fact, much of modern day Rome is built on the same foundations laid nearly 2500 years ago.

Rome has always interested me too.
 
Sep 8, 2017
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#6
I enjoyed it a lot. If you are digging on Rome and Julius Ceasar and that era check out Dan Carlin's Hardcore History podcast "The Celtic Holocost" about Ceasar's campaign against the Goths. "death throes of the republic" was also very interesting. Hell, his stuff on Ghengis Khan and WW1 blew my mind too.
I haven't watch Roman Empire yet but all of Dan Carlin's Hardcore History podcasts are great.
 
Likes: verdugo60
Jul 6, 2010
1,087
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Denver, CO
#8
I'm listening to the new one about Japan and how they went from mid-evil isolationists to a modern industrialized state in the space of about 40 years during the late 19th century. It took Britain 800 years to do that. We know how that worked out during WW2, but fascinating how it got there.
 
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