Rifle to Shoulder Connection

velayo_0317

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Here I discuss some trends I see with my students and how rely they too much on their rear bag to support the back of the rifle. This does not allow the shooter to ever gain positive control of the rifle in the prone causing some recoil management issues.

Building your position, initially, without the aid of a rear bag, allows you to get a better purchase of your rifle in your shoulder, increasing overall control of the rifle and recoil management.

"Building a bridge" is something, regardless of position (standing, kneeling, sitting, bench, prone) that I will do every time to ensure I have properly interfaced with my rifle.

 

B-P-UU

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You mentioned your shooter's checklist.. could you go into more detail on your checklist for prone and positional match shooting? Does it change at all for hunting?
Perhaps it's own thread would be better.

This is something I struggle with.
 

PBWalsh

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Thank you for the video, really helped my understanding of loading the bipod. Frank’s info helps, but your video here definitely gave a bit clearer picture.

Keep up the good work!
 

Jack Master

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Love it. Great form and great tips. Thanks.
 

Josh H

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Light bulb moment for me. Thank you!
 

SD carpenter

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I have an atlas CAL and when I attempt to load the bipod it just seems to slide on the rubber feet. Would the spiked feet help with that?
 

Quest1000

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“As high and medial as possible” so is the buttstock actually on the collar bone?

when I tried this it was on my collar bone. This new position is also going to change my cheek riser height as well. I think I’ve been anchor the butt stock further out in the shoulder pocket and possibly rolling my face over the gun.
 

RoterJager

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“As high and medial as possible” so is the buttstock actually on the collar bone?

when I tried this it was on my collar bone. This new position is also going to change my cheek riser height as well. I think I’ve been anchor the butt stock further out in the shoulder pocket and possibly rolling my face over the gun.
There's a slight bone protrusion where the clavicle and sternum meet, just distal to that seems to be the sweet spot.
 

velayo_0317

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“As high and medial as possible” so is the buttstock actually on the collar bone?

when I tried this it was on my collar bone. This new position is also going to change my cheek riser height as well. I think I’ve been anchor the butt stock further out in the shoulder pocket and possibly rolling my face over the gun.
That's correct. It should land on your collar bone. This makes it so there is very minimal cant of your head when you achieve sight alignment/sight picture.

The connection of your buttstock to your shoulder directly affects the way you put your face on the gun. So I could see that you would probably have to change your cheek riser if you had one. Hopefully the change is for the better!
 

velayo_0317

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I have an atlas CAL and when I attempt to load the bipod it just seems to slide on the rubber feet. Would the spiked feet help with that?
Are you loading onto concrete or dirt? If your rifle is sliding, then I use my grip to slightly pull the rifle back into my shoulder.
 
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SD carpenter

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Are you loading onto concrete or dirt? If your rifle is sliding, then I use my grip to slightly pull the rifle back into my shoulder.
On dirt, I try to make a balance of push/pull like you mentioned with the grip, but trying to replicate you with just bipod loading ends up being a challenge.
 

kthomas

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Excellent video. This is something that I believe I need to work on more and get more proficient at.

Next time I'm at the range, I'm going to be very focused on applying your lesson in this video.

Thanks!
 

8pointer

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I have watched several of your videos you do a great job of simplifying things that have puzzled me for some time thank you. Shooting prone with glasses is still a bit of a struggle I practice a lot on my kitchen floor looking down street. I can't use to the top 1/3rd of my lenses as my Rx is so thick I'm nowhere hear 20/20 up there.....need to be in the center of my lenses which really torques my neck. This positional vid has helped me a ton though thanks
 
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702lineman

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I changed to this position a few weeks ago and have been practicing it a lot. I can tell a huge improvement when spotting my shot. I actually was spotting my own trace, not just the impact for the first time in my life. Thanks Phil!!
 

Nik H

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Here I discuss some trends I see with my students and how rely they too much on their rear bag to support the back of the rifle. This does not allow the shooter to ever gain positive control of the rifle in the prone causing some recoil management issues.

Building your position, initially, without the aid of a rear bag, allows you to get a better purchase of your rifle in your shoulder, increasing overall control of the rifle and recoil management.

"Building a bridge" is something, regardless of position (standing, kneeling, sitting, bench, prone) that I will do every time to ensure I have properly interfaced with my rifle.

Watched this and tried it out today. Holy shit. Took a bit as I had to make a number of changes. Did some dry fire...got comfortable.

I fired 3 separate 5 round groups. Each five round was about 0.5 MOA. Managing recoil was much better than I did before plus my neck felt much better. I always was taught to put the butt of the rifle into the shoulder pocket.

Guess an old dog can learn something new
 

4-Co LR

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Feb 24, 2018
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Great video! Just started the podcast and enjoying it too! You’re a good teacher—not just an instructor (as you have said!