Recommend books

Basher

I fly stuff and I know things.
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Belligerents
Dec 13, 2004
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I love a good book and wanted to let everyone know Unintended consequences by John Ross is in stock at stlccw.com I called to confirm and ordered today. They said they are the publisher and have plenty in stock.
Thanks for the heads up!
 
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memyselfi

memyselfi
Belligerents
Sep 17, 2011
371
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Good Ole USA
Has anyone read Luftwaffe X-planes: German Experimental
by Griehl, Manfred ? Is there a decent amount of actual technical info ?
 
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mikeinfwa

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Belligerents
Mar 20, 2002
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2 Books I recently purchased to add to my collection...



Overview
Hailed as one of the finest examples of aviation research, this comprehensive 1984 study presents a detailed and scrupulously accurate operational history of carrier-based air warfare. From the earliest operations in the Pacific through the decisive Battle of Midway, it offers a narrative account of how ace fighter pilots like Jimmy Thach and Butch O'Hare and their skilled VF squadron mates--called the "first team"--amassed a remarkable combat record in the face of desperate odds. Tapping both American and Japanese sources, historian John B. Lundstrom reconstructs every significant action and places these extraordinary fighters within the context of overall carrier operations. He writes from the viewpoint of the pilots themselves, after interviewing some fifty airmen from each side, to give readers intimate details of some of the most exciting aerial engagements of the war. At the same time he assesses the role the fighter squadrons played in key actions and shows how innovations in fighter tactics and gunnery techniques were a primary reason for the reversal of American fortunes


70681977068199
 
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TB47

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Mar 5, 2019
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I just finished Warrior Diplomat by Michael Waltz -- excellent. Between his multiple deployments as a Green Beret in Afghanistan, he worked on war policy/planning at the Pentagon and the White House. Talks about the war from both perspectives.
 
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MarinePMI

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Belligerents
Jun 3, 2010
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Been going through "The Daily Stoic" and have thoroughly enjoyed it. Think "A Purpose Driven Life" but without the religious aspect. Just stoic philosophy quotes to instigate some introspection each day. Great book.
 
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fx77

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Belligerents
Nov 29, 2005
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pilotjoe

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Belligerents
Apr 17, 2017
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Game of Snipers by Stephen Hunter...Bob Lee Swaqgger series
Yep, it's good. Just finished it. The only thing that was a little off kilter was the bit about the helicopter at the end. Apparently Mr. Hunter didn't have a helicopter pilot to advise him, because what he describes just doesn't work that way. But aside from that the book is another winner.

I understand that he's working on yet another Bob Lee book. YAY!!
 
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fx77

Sergeant
Belligerents
Nov 29, 2005
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ny state
Yep, it's good. Just finished it. The only thing that was a little off kilter was the bit about the helicopter at the end. Apparently Mr. Hunter didn't have a helicopter pilot to advise him, because what he describes just doesn't work that way. But aside from that the book is another winner.

I understand that he's working on yet another Bob Lee book. YAY!!
Also a neck wall thickness of .004 for 338 Lapua kinda slim...
 
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fx77

Sergeant
Belligerents
Nov 29, 2005
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ny state
Great Author: Don Winslw
The Cartel Trilogy
3 books
rich descriptions, culture captured, exciting.....worth reading
 
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hermosabeach

Betty Ford Center
Belligerents
Feb 13, 2012
11,853
61,478
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Betty Ford Clinic
Guns, Germs and Steel-

free- well tax funded at your local library- audio and paper

Why did Europeans develop technology and bring it to the world?
Why didn't Africa conquer the world?
Why are their over 1,000 languages in New Guinea?
Why did children's toys in mexico have wheels, but they had no carts for work and life?
 
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MarinePMI

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Belligerents
Jun 3, 2010
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That was a pretty good read, despite Jared’s liberal politics.

That being said, his book was about 200 pages too long. Harm Di’Blije (sp?) was right; some people say in 500 pages what could best be succinctly said in 85...but that’s not as prestigious. 😆
 
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Sean the Nailer

Sergeant
Belligerents
May 20, 2006
4,246
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Winnipeg, Mb.
I don't know who-all here reads ALL of the Tom Clancy (Jack Ryan) series of books. I have been since the start. And I've enjoyed them very much. And no, I'm not talking about "Op-Center" or any of that stuff.

But this latest book, called "Enemy Contact" by Mike Maden, so far is the absolute worst book in the series. And here's why:
Not just one, but 'some' of the characters in the book are gay/homosexual. And of course,,, it has to be written about/described in the book.

This kind of crap (no pun intended) is NOT what I have enjoyed the Tom Clancy book for, or about.

I'm just sayin'....

:(
 
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MarinePMI

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Just finished "Taken For Granted" by Gianno Caldwell. An excellent read for conservatives! The audio book was narrated by Gianno himself and was what made it so good. At points in the book, you can hear the emotion in his voice.

Having grown up (high school years) in a poor, predominately black neighborhood, this book really resonated with me. All the politicians coming around every four years, and then disappearing afterwards.

This book makes a compelling case, to people of color, about how they are being taken for granted. And backs it up with examples. It also goes after some in GOP for the same behavior; warning that they need to ensure they don't make the same mistakes as the Dems.

Again, a great read.
 
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ebd10

Private
Belligerents
Jan 10, 2012
34
19
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57
The Year-Long Day by A.E. Maxwell and Ivar Ruud. It's about Ivar Ruud's time spent Wintering in the Arctic Circle. His experiences with Polar Bears would give Rambo nightmares.
 
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steve podleski

Private
Minuteman
Nov 26, 2005
40
8
12
"Agincourt" by Bernard Cornwell. Get the audiobook version which has a great narrator. It passes the time away faster on the long commutes with heavy traffic. Great story on the English longbow.
 
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jpickens

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Minuteman
Jul 14, 2017
9
1
2
53
Weston, WV
all of Matt Bracken's books are highly recommended although Castigo Cay gets a little long winded on the technical workings of boats A Coffin Full of dreams is a great read on Congo mercenaries and the Molon Labe series is a great modern day Red Dawn ques series Hidden War is a great non fiction read on the special operations game wardens fight against the cartels illegal operations in our public woodlands and if you want a real toe curling horror fiction based on true events read The Flesh Eaters by L.A Morse it's based of notorious highwayman/ cannibal Sawney Beane and his inbred brood.
 

Greg Langelius *

Resident Elder Fart
Belligerents
Aug 10, 2001
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The last few months I've been restocking my eLibrary, and have been supplementing the "Space"-plus-"Marines" search results with some post apocalyptic fiction. Clearly my reading is escapist. Living in this decade, escapism may not be such a mortal sin. I read here today, reference to "The Flaming Twenties". Dear God, I hope not. My race is nearly run, but I do have descendants...

One such read is a series of three (so far) books by Sean Liscom, The Ranch series. It's well written, plausible within a narrow perspective, and in a big way, rather inspiring.

I've read others, and found them largely depressing. But this is both thought provoking and upbeat; high action with quite a lot of values that Combat Veterans might get behind in a big way.

I won't do spoilers.

I enjoyed the first, am beginning the second, and the third is on deck.

As an aside, many here and elsewhere malign government; but the absence of such is central to the concept of an apocalypse. Also central to the struggle of a return to stability is the theme of reestablishing a government. When such a struggle is complete, in the fictional sense; what emerges as government looks a lot like the one that was lost.

So is this simply a lack of imagination, or is there something more basic and possibly profound at work? Such a quandary, Captain Obvious!

Might it make sense to model a cogent substitution?

Simply wanting an amorphous "change" is what gave us the Obama years. So obviously, that ain't it. Get it even more wrong and we bring on a reality that worships Bernie and Elizabeth, and such, ad nauseam. So that ain't it, either.

Fiction, maybe especially science fiction, could be a valuable vehicle in such an endeavor.

When folks talk about their personal pie in the sky, the work of Heinlein usually moves up to the fore. I love Heinlein's worlds; I'd probably love to be living in them. But they are fiction. As desirable as they may be, there is no clear path from this world to them. We can't see to there from here.

Some clearly believe this can be plotted. Some have tried: Hitler, Lenin, Mao; the list goes on much longer and it continues unbroken to this day. Rich and Elite believe that it can work, it's just never been done right so far. The difference between that and a more reasonable reality is precisely the difference between Trump and Bloomberg, and there is no assurance that either has got it right.

But nobody' going to get it right as long as billions are being spent to stack the deck. I think we all understand how that's playing out, and that this ain't it, either.

As I said, my race is likely nearly run. In making right out of the wrong we live in now, somebody's gonna have to pick up the ball; and that ain't me.

But maybe I could write about it; as science fiction. To do so, I would have to start at the bottom of a tall mountain; step outside some boxes. Not such a long step for me, but still maybe an impossible one.

I'd like to try.

Greg
 
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ebd10

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Belligerents
Jan 10, 2012
34
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57
But maybe I could write about it; as science fiction. To do so, I would have to start at the bottom of a tall mountain; step outside some boxes. Not such a long step for me, but still maybe an impossible one.

I'd like to try.

Greg
This is the age of the internet. If you want to try and make a living as a writer, good luck. BUT, if you just want your words "out there", there are any number of writer's websites that allow for new writers to stretch themselves. No doubt the members of this place would be happy to read whatever you write, and give you caustic, sarcastic, no-holds-bar criticism of said work (That's a good thing.) Heck, I'm already looking forward to reading it.
 

Greg Langelius *

Resident Elder Fart
Belligerents
Aug 10, 2001
7,648
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Arizona, good place for me...
Yes on both, and could you please direct me toward some of those fledgling writer sites. I mainly want to pick brains, but knowing me, I'll almost assuredly be offering myself up for whatever anyway. What astounds me is the occasionally horrific grammar and spelling issues that are (perhaps) too prevalent within the genres.

I love Space Operas, but there are so many and they are so very similar. Breaking in would be hard, and I really respect the genuinely good ones too much to be plagiarizing, and that's so hard to avoid with the plethora of good writing. Besides, once one breaks in, one must therefore also break out.

The Apocalyptic genre is interesting, looks fun; and I am just so woefully deficient in the backstory data that's so essential to succeeding.

My own style of writing tends to be stream of consciousness; a legacy from my I/T Documentation living back in the 90's. I also really suck at character development. I've purchased some guides to effective writing, but I've been just so damned busy reading fiction that I haven't done that plunge as yet.

However, the journey of a thousand miles begins with that same single step as any other one.

Whatever...

Greg
 

steve podleski

Private
Minuteman
Nov 26, 2005
40
8
12
Reading historical fiction books by Bernard Cornwell . One series is the "Saxon Tales" about the struggles between Anglo-Saxons and Danes and Norsemen (Vikings); a Netflix series is based on those books "Last Kingdom". Another series about the battles between Saxons and Britains ( a version of the Arthur legend). Also his book on the Hundred Year War between England and France including Agincourt and Crecy. He also does a great book on Waterloo.
 

Athos300

Private
Minuteman
Nov 16, 2019
13
21
6
The Killer Angels by Michael Shaara is a must read novel, a recreation of Gettysburg. Really engaging and hard to put down.
 
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Rickstir

Private
Minuteman
Jun 19, 2019
24
4
6
My 2 cents:

As much as I loved the Vince Flynn books, I think Brad Taylor's Pike Logan series is better. Brad Thor books rank third in my mind. I didn't discover Brad Taylor until just recently and I don't know how I overlooked such a good writer that also gets all the gun stuff right.

Avoid Ben Coes if you like technical accuracy. The guy is a complete idiot that does zero research for his novels.

Unintended Consequences by John Ross is a must read for any gun geek.

Stephen Hunter's Swagger books are good, but I think his earlier works are better than the later stuff. (I haven't read G-man yet.)
I love the Vince Flynn novels. I sure do hate he is gone. I appreciate the suggestion and will check out Brad Taylor since you think he is better than Vince. I need someone to take his place.
 
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pilotjoe

Private
Belligerents
Apr 17, 2017
93
60
24
Wisconsin
I love the Vince Flynn novels. I sure do hate he is gone. I appreciate the suggestion and will check out Brad Taylor since you think he is better than Vince. I need someone to take his place.
Something else to consider is Wayne Stinnett's "Jesse McDermitt" and "Charity Styles" series. The two are intertwined so if you start one you'll end up reading the other. I like these even more than Flynn or Taylor, although I like those as well. Check out www.waynestinnett.com.
 

Borden Battery

Private
Minuteman
Mar 24, 2020
23
0
2
A Matter of Honour - Pearl Harbour: Betrayal, Blame and a Family's Quest for Justice by Anthony Summers & Robin Swan
- well written book and an easy summer's read which illuminates the background and likely conspiracy to deflect blame from leaders in Washington
- well received by recent military historians and amateur military historians.


American Revolutions - A Continental History, 1750 - 1894 by Alan Taylor, W. W. Norton and Company
- a detailed and sometimes gruelling read but is packed with an enormous amount of facts-based information and references;
- greatly alters the "Hollywood" version of the American "Patriots" which presents an idealistic revolution - which in reality is incorrect;
- the self-serving demands of one-third of the population to expand slavery, break Indian Treaties and land speculation are exposed; and
- the author is a twice awarded Pulitzer Prize winner and the book is extensively referenced to support a more correct historical record.
 

Borden Battery

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Minuteman
Mar 24, 2020
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Stalingrad - The Fateful Siege: 1942-1943 Viking Press, Penguin Books (1998) Sir Antony Beevor (translated into 26 other languages)


Education: Winchester College, Royal Military Academy, Sandhurst. He studied under the military historian John Keegan, and is a former officer with the 11th Hussars.


Stalingrad is a narrative history written by Antony Beevor of the battle fought in and around the city of Stalingrad during World War II, as well as the events leading up to it. It was first published by Viking Press in 1998. Beevor is the author of about 15 books.

The book won the first Samuel Johnson Prize, the Wolfson History Prize, the Hawthornden Prize for Literature and the Baillie Gifford Prize (£30,000).

The book starts with Operation Barbarossa, the German invasion of the USSR in June 1941, and the subsequent drive into the then Soviet Union. Its main focus is the Battle of Stalingrad, in particular the period from the initial German attack to Operation Uranus and the Soviet victory. It details the subsequent battles and war crimes committed by both sides. The book ends with the defeat and surrender of the Germans in February 1943 and the beginning of the Soviet advance on Germany.

Antony Beevor conveys the reality within a conventional narrative - but he concentrates not on strategy, but more on the experience of soldiers on both sides. Number of maps and photographs could be higher - but most military books tend to be lower than I would like. Maps are expensive to create.

His account is enriched by new primary sources including reports on desertions and executions from the archives of the Russian ministry of defence, captured German documents, interrogation of prisoners, private diaries and letters from soldiers on both sides, medical reports and interviews with key witnesses and participants.

I read the book about the same time I was playing the strategic game Stalingrad on a computer. The main full battle game required 2 hours of play per night over 60 days to complete. Supply lines and unit exhaustion levels were critical factors to account for in the game playing.

The game clearly presented the extended "meat grinder" battle situation - a battle of attrition and exhaustion in an arctic weather scenario. The book also presents this impression.

As a final endorsement - I bought a second copy of the book to replace a loaned copy which never came back.
 

Borden Battery

Private
Minuteman
Mar 24, 2020
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2
Canadians on the Somme - the Neglected Campaign

The recent William F. Stewart book entitled "Canadians on the Somme - the Neglected Campaign" is one of those rare books on the Great War which presents (i) a fresh illumination to challenge long-standing assumptions coupled with (ii) very detailed and well researched material; (iii) and a new perspective on a major battle. It is destined to become a key reference text to be studied rather than casually read. This book is a heavy read and not for the neophyte/tenderfoot.

Whereas many books are inflated with extended descriptive narratives, this book exhibits a structured and distilled clarity which articulates fundamental elements while expanding the thinking of the reader. Most paragraphs are packed with informational gems. In addition, the main text includes a detailed supplemental map book with illustrations which compliment the narrative. As battles were planned from maps, it is logical the elements of each battle should be summarized in these high-quality maps.

Just as the chemistry of the Canadian Corps was influenced by the ratio of militia-trained officers to Permanent Force officers - Stewart brings a former extended business career forward into a latter-day doctorate in military history. His approach reflects the business life experiences of performance management measurement practices versus the sometimes-cloistered academic approach. In the final analysis all battles are management by objectives and not tomes of theory. Near the end of the book there is a "Balance Sheet" section which presents a succinct business-like summation of the Canadian experience at the Somme.

Canada entered the Somme campaign under the didactic control of the bombastic Sir Sam Hughes, a hastily organized military system of suspect integrity, an untested and often politically appointed military senior officer corps, an inexperienced and haphazard approach to battle planning and logistics, a cadre of enthusiastic soldiers and an artillery and logistics system to be found wanting. Some ninety days later, and after the wanton wastage of over 24,000 soldiers in a muddle of victories and defeats; Sam Hughes is gone, the visceral weaknesses of the budding Canadian Corps is exposed, and the core genesis of the future Canadian Corps forms in this crucible. The near incompetence of the senior British and Canadian officer corps is highlighted on page 216 where the extremely depleted attacking battalions (some at 1/6 normal strength and exhausted from extended time in the front lines) are tasked with virtually impossible tasks. How the soldiers and junior officers knowingly attacked is likely a combination of naïve trust and fatalistic resignation.

In one paragraph (page 38) on the then General Haig, the author articulates the character and weaknesses of the man - which then underscore his planning and operation of the Battle of the

Somme. One understands more about the man from this single paragraph than from reading books by Duff Cooper et al. We are later given insight into the misplaced coup d'oeil displayed by Haig, Gough and Charteris and the lack of experience and stature of the Canadian Corps senior officers to challenge orders and directives which were clearly ill-conceived and poorly planned. The crucible of suffering of the poor bloody infantry at the Somme would not be repeated by the growing cadre of Canadian Corps officer core during the second half of the Great War. In later battles, the Canadian Corps will challenge Haig et al when orders are ill-conceived. In the future, the Canadian Corps battle plans will, in general, be much more studied, practiced and executed.

On page 122, and as an example of the detailed level of research, Stewart comments on the botched local formation relief of the German's 7th's Division's 393 IR regiment near Regina Trench on 21 September 1916. The lack of Germans noted in a scouting report is not a retreat. The utter frustration of attacking Regina Trench can also be felt within the text.

The Stewart book is destined to become a classic reference text for the serious reader of the Great War - Canadian or otherwise. It is not a book for the neophyte. Few other books dissect the background, the characters, the foibles of the senior commanders in a series of battles, the fortitude of the poor bloody infantry, and the formation of the foundation of an emerging Canadian Army. The Somme presented the senior officer corps with a potpourri of new offensive and defensive technologies and a dearth of strategic and tactical options. Interplay of personalities and the initial role of politics in the selection of many is included. The transition towards an officer corps based on a meritocracy is glimpsed at.

This Canadian book does not carry the baggage and trauma of many British texts on the battles of the Somme and Passchendaele and the author provides some insight into both this distinction and how the topic is treated in his book.

Finally, the text includes sections entitled "Call-Outs", "Analysis" and "Aftermath" comments. The book concludes with a distilled summary of the six elements Stewart ascribes to the core of the Canadian experience at the Somme. As a future research tool, the end includes indices on the battles, terms used, military formations, places and the main people involved. If one could buy only one book on the Great War - the Stewart text would likely be the choice of the discerning reader.
 

steve podleski

Private
Minuteman
Nov 26, 2005
40
8
12
Stalingrad - The Fateful Siege: 1942-1943 Viking Press, Penguin Books (1998) Sir Antony Beevor (translated into 26 other languages)


Education: Winchester College, Royal Military Academy, Sandhurst. He studied under the military historian John Keegan, and is a former officer with the 11th Hussars.


Stalingrad is a narrative history written by Antony Beevor of the battle fought in and around the city of Stalingrad during World War II, as well as the events leading up to it. It was first published by Viking Press in 1998. Beevor is the author of about 15 books.

The book won the first Samuel Johnson Prize, the Wolfson History Prize, the Hawthornden Prize for Literature and the Baillie Gifford Prize (£30,000).

The book starts with Operation Barbarossa, the German invasion of the USSR in June 1941, and the subsequent drive into the then Soviet Union. Its main focus is the Battle of Stalingrad, in particular the period from the initial German attack to Operation Uranus and the Soviet victory. It details the subsequent battles and war crimes committed by both sides. The book ends with the defeat and surrender of the Germans in February 1943 and the beginning of the Soviet advance on Germany.

Antony Beevor conveys the reality within a conventional narrative - but he concentrates not on strategy, but more on the experience of soldiers on both sides. Number of maps and photographs could be higher - but most military books tend to be lower than I would like. Maps are expensive to create.

His account is enriched by new primary sources including reports on desertions and executions from the archives of the Russian ministry of defence, captured German documents, interrogation of prisoners, private diaries and letters from soldiers on both sides, medical reports and interviews with key witnesses and participants.

I read the book about the same time I was playing the strategic game Stalingrad on a computer. The main full battle game required 2 hours of play per night over 60 days to complete. Supply lines and unit exhaustion levels were critical factors to account for in the game playing.

The game clearly presented the extended "meat grinder" battle situation - a battle of attrition and exhaustion in an arctic weather scenario. The book also presents this impression.

As a final endorsement - I bought a second copy of the book to replace a loaned copy which never came back.
Does the book say why the Gerrmans did not encircle Stalingrad in a pincer movement and let their allies pin the Russians in the city e.g. exactly what the Russians did?
 
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Borden Battery

Private
Minuteman
Mar 24, 2020
23
0
2
Does the book say why the Gerrmans did not encircle Stalingrad in a pincer movement and let their allies pin the Russians in the city e.g. exactly what the Russians did?
Typical target fixation - focus on Stalingrad and little thought that several Armies from Siberia which had arrived. Stalingrad was back-stopped by the Dnieper River - could not encircle until it froze. Russians fought tenacioulsly. Hitler was controlling from Berlin. Paulus was a weak operational commander. Supply lines were stretched, winter was coming, Goering could not re-supply by air, etc. etc. Numerous factors in combination.
 

steve podleski

Private
Minuteman
Nov 26, 2005
40
8
12
"Thud Ridge" written by F105 pilot, COL J. Broughton. It is about F105 operations against the Hanoi area. Delivering bombs by dive bombing their targets against Sams and radar-directed large caliber AAA defenses in good or mostly bad weather (although small caliber fireams were also danger) Targets and routes to and from target were restricted by micromanagement from Washington, DC. which allowed the enemy to concentrate their defenses: "don't bomb here, here, here and here and btw, ignore those SAM launches, Mig bases and AAA concentrations"! As now, the battle is planned by lawyers and politicians (but I repeat myself). BTW, the 105 did all the missions in the high risk areas, not B52s, not F4s.
 

Borden Battery

Private
Minuteman
Mar 24, 2020
23
0
2
Agree with you - these pilots and planes carried the load in the early part of the Vietnam War. In addition, there are a couple good documentaries on this rugged aircraft on YouTube.