New Butcher Block Top, How do I attach it?

MinnesotaMulisha

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Menards was having a sale on birch butcher block so I picked up a couple slabs.

This winter I'll be buying some cabinets to set the butcher block on.

How do I go about attaching the butcher block to the top of the cabinets? Should I use construction adhesive?

I am also concerned that the cabinets might not support the use of a barrel vise. Any concerns there?

Thanks
 
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Threadcutter308

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Menards was having a sale on birch butcher block so I picked up a couple slabs.

This winter I'll be buying some cabinets to set the butcher block on.

How do I go about attaching the butcher block to the top of the cabinets? Should I use construction adhesive?

I am also concerned that the cabinets might not support the use of a barrel vise. Any concerns there?

Thanks
I wouldn't use any adhesive at all. I would lag bolt from the cabinets, upward, into the bottom of the butcher block. Think in terms of possibly having to move it. With lag bolts, just back them out and away you go......
 
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Threadcutter308

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Thanks. I haven't done any cabinetry work before, is there something solid to attach to?
there are probably at least two, 3/4" x 3" or 4" straps that run left to right, horizontally. You could drill through those and run lag bolts up through them. But, I'd be tempted to lay down a layer of 3/4" plywood and glue/screw it to the top of the cabinets. Then, you have all kinds of area (and added strength) to run lag bolts through.
 

MinnesotaMulisha

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Thanks Thread cutter.

It's currently unfinished. I'm thinking a nice coat of poly across the top would protect it rather well.
 

12Bravo

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We are looking at doing the same thing next year. These are the brackets I was looking at using. May be an option. Home Depot has them for a couple bucks.
View attachment 7179943
I'd go with a combination of glueing a sheet of 3/4" plywood to the underside of the butcher block (recessed to fit inside the top of the cabinet, if possible) and connected to the cabinetry with the type of brackets shown above. The plywood will definitely increase the overall rigidity of the butcher block surface. Assuming this is going to be a work surface, my recommendation is to use a rubbed oil finish, like Watco Danish Oil, instead of polyurethane. When the surface gets scratched and looks a little tired, a quick wipe with more Danish Oil will make it look as good as new. I made my reloading bench top using yellow pine 2x10s and finished it this way and have been very pleased about how it has held up over time.
 

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Rlandry

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I would rethink your idea of purchasin cabinets. The lowe's/Home Depot cabinets are going to be constructed out of particle board and put together with wire staples. It's going to need some serious reinforcing to stand up to the stress generated by a reloading reloading press plus a lot of gunsmithing projects if you do that kind of stuff. By the time you do that and prepare the tops for attachment, you are just about same in time and expense as building a base from scratch.
Mine is made with 4X4 legs, 2X4 frame with a lot of reinforcement, and 3/4" plywood for surfaces, screwed every 6 inches, then lag screwed to a couple of wall studs..
The Home Depot brackets shown in the previous posts look like an effective way to go, but the cabinet, if you choose to go that route you are still going to need to do a lot of reinforcement.
 

MinnesotaMulisha

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My current bench is 4x4 legs, 2x6 frame and 3/4" plywood top and would more than handle the top.

The cabinets won't be particle board, they're going to be sold wood. Probably maple or birch, but they still may not be strong enough
to support the forces generated from replacing barrels and other gunsmithing projects like you mentioned.
 

Rlandry

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Unless you get into the upper end stuff, the doors and facings will be solid wood but the sides and shelving will most likely be veneer covered particle or pressed board sections and will be set into dados cut into 1X2s, possibly glued, but still most likely stapled together. It's your choice. I've seen reloading setups done on everything from a Black & Decker Workmate to a bench you could drive a truck on. I just think you are going to end up being very unhappy with a big box store cabinet when you can build a very nice setup for around $100 and an afternoon. Even if the materials run a little more, you still only buy once, cry once and you have a work space that will last forever.
 

MinnesotaMulisha

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Unless you get into the upper end stuff, the doors and facings will be solid wood but the sides and shelving will most likely be veneer covered particle or pressed board sections and will be set into dados cut into 1X2s, possibly glued, but still most likely stapled together. It's your choice. I've seen reloading setups done on everything from a Black & Decker Workmate to a bench you could drive a truck on. I just think you are going to end up being very unhappy with a big box store cabinet when you can build a very nice setup for around $100 and an afternoon. Even if the materials run a little more, you still only buy once, cry once and you have a work space that will last forever.
We just moved into a new house, and when we do, I told my bride thatI was going all out with my setup as I plan on being in this house for a long time.

It may come down to having to build cabinets just to support the damn butcher block.

I don't mind the raw lumber built bench as it will work very well, but I want something appealing to the eye.
 

Rlandry

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I painted the benchwork with white semi-gloss and the plywood top a dark green, but you don't have to paint your top. I used HD white shelving and brackets and mounted peg board between the shelves.

In your case, for attaching the top, I would put gussets in the corners(securely screwed in place and go through those into the top with large screws. I think I would also go with glue along with the screws. Use a stud finder to find a couple of studs and lag screw the base to the studs.
 

padom

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Unless you're buying or having made solid wood cabinets you wont want to attach that top directly to the cabinets. As others have mentioned the straps across the top will be cheap pine or nost likely particle board. Fine for actual countertops but not for pulling force when a press or vice is attached...

If you are dead set on pre-made cabinets. Make a solid frame out of 4x4 and 2x4, bolted to wall, attach your top from underneath with bolts, pre-drilling beforehand, then sliding your cabinets in underneath and trimming out around the face to hide your frame.......
 
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