Lack of Training

Alpine 338

Lumberjack
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Jun 26, 2010
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NW Colorado
No one knows it all, if you think you do, you're kidding yourself.

One area of training that I'm really lacking in is Flora, particularly edible and medicinal plants.

I wish I could spend a week with an expert in my particular area, going over everything, with in-depth hands on training.
 

Hobo Hilton

Private
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Jun 4, 2011
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Seriously.... There have been days (after visiting my MD) that I felt I should travel out to the reservation and attempt to spend time with the Medicine Man...

Obviously, by posting here, it is something that is on your mind. I encourage you to follow your soul and learn as much as possible. When the time comes, You will be a tremendous asset to your tribe..

Hobo
 

WIVigilance

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Mar 10, 2017
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Tom brown books? I think I remember reading some sections on this topic, not just his tracking book but it was a bushcraft book.
 

Gunfighter14e2

Rusty Nail
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Jul 9, 2002
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eHam.net
When store bought runs out so will the so called self proclaimed survivalist. Knowing whats in all A/O's to eat an make meds from is the key to long term.
When store bought runs out, so will the bulk of the heart beats on this rock.
 

45.308

Gunny Sergeant
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Nov 15, 2007
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Glacier Valley Alaska
There are resources to use. Interweb, local outdoor groups / botanist, F&G, pamphlets / books. It would be good to spend time with an elder out in several a small villages but even their knowledge is a dying skill. Like all cultures, most youth don't have much interest.

I dabbled in eatable plants when I was guiding and instructing, and to stay away from cow parsnip and sun ouch, and berries because certain areas are loaded with berries, grab a hand full and snack on, avoid anything white or milky.
 
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Vallecito1

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Feb 5, 2020
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I am not a doctor and this post is not intended as advice, medical or otherwise. That being said, the original poster has a legitimate concern and here is what I know. Where I live (Northern NM) there is a useful medicinal plant. It‘s common name is Osha, the scientific name is Ligusticum Porteri. It is a relative of parsley. It is native to the Mountain West and I have personally seen it in my native NM as well as CO, WY, MT, UT, ID and AZ. It is found in the subalpine associated with Engelmann Spruce. It lives near meadows and water and in partial shade. It looks a lot like various types of poision hemlock so be extra careful. It may be distinguished from hemlock by its odor. The smell is strong, similar to parsley, celery or licorice. The root is where the medicine is. Once you pick it, wash it and dry it. But don’t over wash it. I suspect that small bits of soil in contact with the roots have something to do with its medicinal qualities. Store it in dry clean containers once dehydrated. To use it you may boil the roots into tea. But the best method is to chew the dry roots, a small quantity will do as it is potent. Osha protects from disease from viruses and bacteria. It may help you once you are sick but your best bet is to use it before you get sick and take it regularly, especially in winter. It seems to make the body more resistant to contracting colds or flu. For me it prevents illness outright or minimizes the impact of illness dramatically. Again use caution. I would not be surprised if this root would make some people sick or cause an allergy.
 
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acudaowner

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Dec 26, 2018
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used to know a sort of hippie girl many years ago who would follow the grateful dead tours all over the place she swore that the dog poo she smeared on people's faces had medicinal properties in it people would let her do this but in the end it was just dog poop .
 
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Alpine 338

Lumberjack
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NW Colorado
I was talking to one of the local old timers the other day. He lives remote, off-grid on a mining claim his grandfather started over a hundred years ago. He has lived locally most of his life, other than a short period in Alaska. He's also a green thumb, and grows his own veggies. We're going to get together this Summer to go over the plants in the area.