Hiking boot recommendation

BoilerUP

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Have a pair of Merrell Moab 2 mid boots that are just about worn out. Very comfortable and look good...but mine aren't anything resembling waterproof or even water resistant.

Have a trip coming up this summer to Badlands/Yellowstone/Tetons and need to get a new pair; getting a pair of Merrell Waterproof boots seems a no-brainer, but I've seen plenty of gripes that they aren't waterpoof (note: I'm not looking for muck boots, just something that won't get wet if I go through wet grass or soft ground)..

I figure plenty of folks on the Hide have similar outdoor pursuits and I'm curious what everybody likes.
 

earthtrekker1775

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The merrells will be waterproof enough for that. My personal preference is to have quick drying boots for 3-season use and waterproof with tall gaitors for winter/real wet stuff. The problem is that if you do get your waterproof boots soaked, they take forever to dry.
 
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PrecisionRifleGuy

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I would go with the MOAB2 again mate. I love mine. Give them a spray with some waterproofing spray. You should be able to get it from where you buy the boots. When you have finished your trip, give them a cleanup and spray again. They should keep you dry.
 

pmclaine

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I just bought my second set of MOABII using a coupon from their site.

The MOAB is my lightweight hiker good for about 90 percent of the walking around, better weather, intermediate terrain stuff I do.

If I want more support I go with Limmer medium weights.

http://www.limmerboot.com/

I did that exact trip three or four years ago travelling cross country from MA to the west in a Honda Pilot, wife and 2 kids, great time.

The Moab II were my boot for that trip only finding them not perfectly adequate when they were all I had for horseback riding.

There was a pretty good steakhouse we found near Yellowstone and we went on an outstanding 4 hour horseback ride from a outfit just outside Jackson Hole that had we planned it better we would have stayed after the ride for the "cowboy" steak dinner than ranch can cook up.

Let me know if tracking down info on either interests you.

If you can possibly make it to the Custer Battlefield it was one of the highlights of my trip. I included it on the route of travel when we drove from the Black Hills region over to Yellowstone. Killed me having to drive by Devils Tower but it was a long ride and didnt have the time.
 

PrepareSmarter

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The Solomon's are OK. I hiked 8mi in my Quest GTX 4d in a downpour and they took a week to dry. I'm starting to think a treated leather boot for wet/cold and a light quick drying boot for the other 3 seasons is the way to go.
 
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BoilerUP

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If you can possibly make it to the Custer Battlefield it was one of the highlights of my trip. I included it on the route of travel when we drove from the Black Hills region over to Yellowstone. Killed me having to drive by Devils Tower but it was a long ride and didnt have the time.
We're dragging the travel trailer with us so once we hit Badlands its gonna be a bit of a whirlwind...not as much time each place as I would probably like, but trying to cram as much as possible into two weeks as humanly possible with the wife and 8/5 year old boys.

Badlands, over to Rapid City for Rushmore and Wind Cave, Devil's Tower and Little Bighorn on the way to Billings, through Bozeman down to West Yellowstone for four nights, then down to Jackson for Grand Teton and finally making our way back east through Laramie.

If the family is wiped, I'll put their asses on Delta in Jackson and come back at my leisure :ROFLMAO::ROFLMAO:

I think I've decided to go with the MOAB 2 GoreTex mid hikers.
 

pmclaine

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We're dragging the travel trailer with us so once we hit Badlands its gonna be a bit of a whirlwind...not as much time each place as I would probably like, but trying to cram as much as possible into two weeks as humanly possible with the wife and 8/5 year old boys.

Badlands, over to Rapid City for Rushmore and Wind Cave, Devil's Tower and Little Bighorn on the way to Billings, through Bozeman down to West Yellowstone for four nights, then down to Jackson for Grand Teton and finally making our way back east through Laramie.

If the family is wiped, I'll put their asses on Delta in Jackson and come back at my leisure :ROFLMAO::ROFLMAO:

I think I've decided to go with the MOAB 2 GoreTex mid hikers.

Wind Cave was fucking dynamite. Make sure you visit the original opening as I think many miss it. There is a small walk just in front of the original opening that takes you over a bluff onto the prairie - beautiful. It was HAF when we were there the cave was natural AC. If you go when storms are playing with air pressure it effects the breathing of the cave.

The Bear safari nearby was awesome too.

Little BigHorn was interesting as hell wished I had more time there. Arrived about 2pm and still needed to get down Yellowstone way that night. Wished I had time to go over the river to the area where the Indians were camped so I could have viewed the terrain from their perspective.
 
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pmclaine

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PS.....

If you plan on visiting Mt Rushmore do it toward dusk.

Ride Custer State Park in late afternoon you will surely see wildlife. Only word of caution there are parts of the roadway cut through rock make sure your vehicle will fit if you are oversized.

Be at Rushmore before full sun set. From the parking lot you can see all the way back to the Badlands.

At night the Park Service does a lazer light history show of the mountain. Think they had fireworks too. Unsure if that is every night but it was certainly happening the night we were there.

When they pull the colors they have all veterans in attendance come down on stage and perform the retiring of the colors.

Generally I'm hesitant to identify as a veteran but my kids were goading me into going on stage.

Pretty glad I did because I feel it was an honor to be part of retiring colors there.

Man getting jealous of your trip.
 

pewpewfever

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My experience with waterproof boots is that they all lose their waterproofing with only a little wear, and they are torturously hot and heavy. I prefer ventilated trail shoes, like merrell has. They don’t keep the wet out but they dry out quickly. Letting the extremities breathe in the summer is a must for me.
 

ZEROGUY

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I'm on my 2nd set of Lowa Zephyrs, I can't recommend them enough. First set busted through the gortex liner after 3 years of near daily use, but the soles were pretty shot before that anyways. Great 3 season boot. Super light and comfortable, breathes well and are waterproof. Only problem I've found is the soft sole wears quicker that normal if your feet spend a lot of time on pavement vs terrain.

I also have a pair of Renegades I wear for colder/wetter stuff, those have a vibram sole that seems to wear a lot better, but are heavier and don't breathe well on account of the all leather upper.
 

McReef

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I hesitate to offer my opinion as I probably have far less experience and knowledge than a lot of others on here, but I’ve had a pair of Danners for quite some time and they have worn well with nary a leak yet. I’m no mountain man, but they get used, and I am happy.
 

45.308

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A WP liner sewn into the boot has become a must have to sell. About 15 years ago those companies who did not offer a WP barrier boot were losing sales to those who did so, they had to offer them to keep up in sales. Marketing and advertising is a strong medicine to sell product to the masses. Depending on your AO, open weave Vs a barrier is a personal choice. In a dry dusty AO the open weave can let in particles that can cause friction and breakdown the material and migrate to your feet on long treks. In super slop the open weave will allow water to escape as you walk, like a pump.

With any stitched seam panel boot, before you wear them out of the house, run a bead of seamgrip on every seam. Get a waterproof for the material of your boot, I learned to like waterbased like Nikwax, when your boots are wet after use or just get them wet, the waterbased WP will wick into the material to help WP and protect the material.

Use quality 60/40 socks in my experience. I do not like the performance of 100% wool. Socks are for managing the micro climate around the foot, cushioning and comfort. But they will change the shape of the entire foot so if you have hot spots, try a different brand of sock.

Use superfeet, I also thought they were just a sales gimmick until I started using them. Many copies these days but superfeet are my choice. Don't buy them too big, while not an arch support but that is what most call it, supefeet support under the talus bone that supports body weight Vs and true arch support that does nothing. At first, superfeet at the correct size will feel short as the talus bone has support, at the back of the arch. The heel cup focuses heel meat / fat to give some cushioning on heel strikes. I like the pilot bump on the forefoot to allow some circulation for 25 mile a day treks. I choice is green or orange but most of buy boots now how the trail / hunters due to I am just around town and like hiking.

I prefer LaSportiva. In my experience using and selling boots for about 15 years, the are the top shelf boot. I prefer a neutral last like most Italian boots and then custom fit to the foot.



 
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danatkins

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A WP liner sewn into the boot has become a must have to sell. About 15 years ago those companies who did not offer a WP barrier boot were losing sales to those who did so, they had to offer them to keep up in sales. Marketing and advertising is a strong medicine to sell product to the masses. Depending on your AO, open weave Vs a barrier is a personal choice. In a dry dusty AO the open weave can let in particles that can cause friction and breakdown the material and migrate to your feet on long treks. In super slop the open weave will allow water to escape as you walk, like a pump.

With any stitched seam panel boot, before you wear them out of the house, run a bead of seamgrip on every seam. Get a waterproof for the material of your boot, I learned to like waterbased like Nikwax, when your boots are wet after use or just get them wet, the waterbased WP will wick into the material to help WP and protect the material.

Use quality 60/40 socks in my experience. I do not like the performance of 100% wool. Socks are for managing the micro climate around the foot, cushioning and comfort. But they will change the shape of the entire foot so if you have hot spots, try a different brand of sock.

Use superfeet, I also thought they were just a sales gimmick until I started using them. Many copies these days but superfeet are my choice. Don't buy them too big, while not an arch support but that is what most call it, supefeet support under the talus bone that supports body weight Vs and true arch support that does nothing. At first, superfeet at the correct size will feel short as the talus bone has support, at the back of the arch. The heel cup focuses heel meat / fat to give some cushioning on heel strikes. I like the pilot bump on the forefoot to allow some circulation for 25 mile a day treks. I choice is green or orange but most of buy boots now how the trail / hunters due to I am just around town and like hiking.

I prefer LaSportiva. In my experience using and selling boots for about 15 years, the are the top shelf boot. I prefer a neutral last like most Italian boots and then custom fit to the foot.



I've got a pair of Makalu boots from them I bought from a boot shop online after 5 years they lost their waterproofing due to the toe box separating wonder if they would fix that since I don't have the receipt anymore
 

HogsLife

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I would check out the Lowa Renegades as well. Been running them a long time, and so does the wife. Great boot.
 

CMH

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If you are looking for a low or mid hiking boot, take a look at Oboz. I used to be a Merrell and Keen guy. The Oboz are similar in style, but superior in construction and fit. Mine last about 1.5-2X as long as the best pair of Merrell's or Keen's I ever had. They are not available everywhere, but REI carries a pretty good selection of them.
 
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Lkwoolsey

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Have a pair of Merrell Moab 2 mid boots that are just about worn out. Very comfortable and look good...but mine aren't anything resembling waterproof or even water resistant.

Have a trip coming up this summer to Badlands/Yellowstone/Tetons and need to get a new pair; getting a pair of Merrell Waterproof boots seems a no-brainer, but I've seen plenty of gripes that they aren't waterpoof (note: I'm not looking for muck boots, just something that won't get wet if I go through wet grass or soft ground)..

I figure plenty of folks on the Hide have similar outdoor pursuits and I'm curious what everybody likes.
I use the Lowa Tibet Hi GTX. They have a lower version which would probably suit you better, but they've kept my feet dry hunting and hiking all over the Pacific Northwest for the past 3 years or so. I've crossed creeks, been in torrential downpours, etc, and never had wet feet (minus sweat). Just my thoughts, I really like them.
 
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Dougie308

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+1 for Moab

Have a pair of Merrell Moab 2 mid boots that are just about worn out. Very comfortable and look good...but mine aren't anything resembling waterproof or even water resistant.

Have a trip coming up this summer to Badlands/Yellowstone/Tetons and need to get a new pair; getting a pair of Merrell Waterproof boots seems a no-brainer, but I've seen plenty of gripes that they aren't waterpoof (note: I'm not looking for muck boots, just something that won't get wet if I go through wet grass or soft ground)..

I figure plenty of folks on the Hide have similar outdoor pursuits and I'm curious what everybody likes.
 

aslrookie

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I used to have the MOAB. My problem was they got really hot and caused my feet to get blisters easily after long hikes.

I switched to X ultras, and they have held up longer, cooler even on warm days, and even crossing streams kept my feet dry. The only time my feet actually got wet was when I stood in a stream.

I’ve considered trying la sportivas next. I tried on a pair of the spire gtx and really liked them. My adventures are in the pnw so waterproofing is important without making my feet overheat.
 

dreever

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If you are looking for a low or mid hiking boot, take a look at Oboz. I used to be a Merrell and Keen guy. The Oboz are similar in style, but superior in construction and fit. Mine last about 1.5-2X as long as the best pair of Merrell's or Keen's I ever had. They are not available everywhere, but REI carries a pretty good selection of them.
Yep, OBOZ for me. Started out with Merrill's, then Keens then bought my first pair of OBOZ and never looked back!
 

FatBoy

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I have worn out two pairs of Asolos, a set of Fugetives and a set just like the Fugitive but with two lace clips instead of three and about 6oz lighter. Daily wear on cell sites, hunting, hiking, etc. Both Waterproof to the end. The only reason they got retired to grass cutting duty us I pronate and the outer heals wears off unevenly. When it gets too bad they get retired. I get about 2 years a pair and they have both still been waterproof when retired with 300+ trail miles and daily wear.


Running a set of Danner Crater Rims now. Heavy fuckers but did fine hiking in snow and ice cold creeks in Colorado last week. Stayed waterproof.

My next set will be another pair of Fugetives. They are by no means a light hiker, but they are an awesome boot that are comfortable, functional and hold up.
 
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bourbonbent

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This pair of Lowas is going on 10 years old, and have more miles than I can remember on them.

7083386

I’ve worn through Oakley’s in 6 months, issued boots lasted a little longer but not much. Frankly I’ll never buy another lace up boot that’s not Lowa until I have a reason to do otherwise. Going to get a pair of the Rangers and see how they fair. This pair seems likely to outlast me.
 
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M8541Reaper

Super Boot
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Solomon XA Forces GTX boots... Best boots I've ever worn and had no problems with the waterproofing. They are lightweight and comfortable. When I burn these out, I'm definitely buying another pair. No problems standing in water and tracking through mud/slush/snow without water getting in during a 5 week LR course in an AR winter wonderland.

Also, I think OP Tactical is running a sale on them right now.
 

Simia Dei

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I don't know if many people have had much experience with them, but for my winter hikes/hunts I use a set of Hanwag Tatras. Most comfortable and warm boots I've used, really stable and waterproof. They're like walking with a sofa on each foot. I keep the salomon comets or a set of salawas for summer hunting, salawas are shit for walking through loose gravel/leaves on any incline though.
 

abn31c

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Crispi for the light stuff
Kenetrek for everything else, especially in the rocks or side hilling.
 

uncle_smokey

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This pair of Lowas is going on 10 years old, and have more miles than I can remember on them.

View attachment 7083386

I’ve worn through Oakley’s in 6 months, issued boots lasted a little longer but not much. Frankly I’ll never buy another lace up boot that’s not Lowa until I have a reason to do otherwise. Going to get a pair of the Rangers and see how they fair. This pair seems likely to outlast me.
Lowa’s Rock. My Tibet GTX are bomb proof. They are one the heavy side, but I never have to worry about my feet or my boots when I have them on.
 

sako17

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I've had the Keen Targhee, which are great if you are after a shoe (Merrell are pretty good too). However, I now almost exclusively wear boots – I had some foot problems and boots were the only things that I could wear for any length of time. I also find boots are a bit more durable (I tend to destroy shoes pretty quickly)

I've tried most brands and currently have Scarpa and Zamberlan. They are both excellent and very comfortable. The Scarpa are quite a bit lighter (Terra GTX model) and are easy to get used to.

My Zamberlan (Tofane GTX) are a Norwegian welt and are very comfortable and very tough. They are, however, very heavy (I think they weigh almost 1kg each! Seriously), and are quite expensive. If you want something that is incredibly tough – almost indestructible – then these are the ones to go for.
 

pblank

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If you have a narrow foot la Sportiva is great. For a wider foot, I'd try scarpa. Three season mountaineering boots are the bee's knees as hiking boots.
 

Mikeatshamrock

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I live and work on a ranch in northern California where the summers are as dry as a popcorn fart and enough rain in the winter to float cow turds. The Lowa Renegade is the best boot I have found for everyday wear at a reasonable price in this inhospitable environment. With a little care they remain waterproof and wear good.
 

HogsLife

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I live and work on a ranch in northern California where the summers are as dry as a popcorn fart and enough rain in the winter to float cow turds. The Lowa Renegade is the best boot I have found for everyday wear at a reasonable price in this inhospitable environment. With a little care they remain waterproof and wear good.
I’m here in Southern California and have been running the Lowa Renegades for a few years now. Hands down my favorite hiking / hunting boots. My wife has a pair as well and she’s equally impressed with them. Great boot.
 

BigBC

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I've had Solomon Quest 4ds as well and they've held up to rain and puddles (no river wading) I pair it with Darn Tough wool socks.
 

PMCfighter

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I have two boots that i tell everyone they showed own The Merrill Moab II and if you can find them the Belleville Kiowa originally made by Tactical Research Group.

I have had the same pair of Kiowa boots for over 6 years in absolutely every type of environment (except the arctic of course) you can get through on foot. Every state in every weather condition rock of every type dirt sand clay in multiple countries and though they look worn not run down just worn. they have staid together awesome, look good, are super light weight. I have used them to fast rope many times ladder slide and HALO and they are going as strong today as the day i got them and i am really hard on shoes. They offer great ankle support and traction. i have multiple pairs for when these finally give it up because when i found out they were going to stop making them i bought six pair. now you can still find them online and on Ebay but i swear by them they are really good boots. everyone ive turned on to them loves them.

I like my Moabs very much but they end up getting replaced once a year because they just dont stand up to the environments i use them in.
 

Mike Casselton

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We're dragging the travel trailer with us so once we hit Badlands its gonna be a bit of a whirlwind...not as much time each place as I would probably like, but trying to cram as much as possible into two weeks as humanly possible with the wife and 8/5 year old boys.

Badlands, over to Rapid City for Rushmore and Wind Cave, Devil's Tower and Little Bighorn on the way to Billings, through Bozeman down to West Yellowstone for four nights, then down to Jackson for Grand Teton and finally making our way back east through Laramie.

If the family is wiped, I'll put their asses on Delta in Jackson and come back at my leisure :ROFLMAO::ROFLMAO:

I think I've decided to go with the MOAB 2 GoreTex mid hikers.
Harney Peak is worth the 3.5 mile hike while you are in and around Rapid City/Hill City/Mt Rushmore area.

First Stop Guns in Rapid City should not be bypassed.
 

User08239040

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I did a 16 mile 4000ft elevation gain hike with a new pair of "Salomon X Ultra 3 Mid Aero" hiking boots this weekend. It drizzled the last few hours of the hike and my feet were dry when I made it back to camp. Breathable boots with good wool socks are the way to go unless you anticipate severe wet conditions like snow or muck. I don't know if these boots have enough support for multi-day trips with a heavy pack, but it doesn't sound like that's what you're after.
 

D_TROS

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Im a long time asolo guy, but recently tried a set of Oboz on a friends recommendation. Insanely light and very supportative. Nothing bad to say. Still in shock how light they are.

My wife got a pair of La Sportiva and really likes them.

Cant go wrong with any of them I spose.

DT
 

556ARs

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My Lowa's are incredible boots.
They're not cheap, but boots are NOT something to skimp on. I paid just under $300 for mine.
The best hiking boots aren't made of leather.