Cerakote tip?

TresMon

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Looking for suggestions on how to hold very small parts for squirting and baking. Recently did a Beretta TomCat. = Very small parts.

Thanks.
 

AIAW

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Parts you can't hang with a small piece of wire I typically hot-glue a 6" long bolt or any sort of handle-type "thing" to a part of the piece that isn't visible. Hot-glue comes right off when you want it to.

I'm no pro though, so someone might have a much better suggestion than that!
 
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spife7980

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I will wrap a small wire or paper clip around bolts to spray the exposed heads or through the pin holes and then I can just use that same wire to suspend them from a wire rack in the oven to cure. I will also poke the bolt etc through a piece of paper or masking tape to avoid over spray, I then flash it in the oven for 15 minutes or so to harden it just a tad and stop flowing before I remove the paper/tape. Too much longer though and the tape glues will leave gross glue remnants or the paint will cure to the paper leaving a gross edge once cured.

The best method will depend on the part.



Parts you can't hang with a small piece of wire I typically hot-glue a 6" long bolt or any sort of handle-type "thing" to a part of the piece that isn't visible. Hot-glue comes right off when you want it to.

I'm no pro though, so someone might have a much better suggestion than that!
And the hot glue would last through the oven phase without letting loose and dropping the part on the bottom of the oven?
 

AIAW

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I will wrap a small wire or paper clip around bolts to spray the exposed heads or through the pin holes and then I can just use that same wire to suspend them from a wire rack in the oven to cure. I will also poke the bolt etc through a piece of paper or masking tape to avoid over spray, I then flash it in the oven for 15 minutes or so to harden it just a tad and stop flowing before I remove the paper/tape. Too much longer though and the tape glues will leave gross glue remnants or the paint will cure to the paper leaving a gross edge once cured.

The best method will depend on the part.

And the hot glue would last through the oven phase without letting loose and dropping the part on the bottom of the oven?
Good point. The oven-cure series would need wire most likely in some fashion. I haven't done small parts with the oven bake method though - just stuff I could hang in some way.

I use the hot-glue method for the air-dry (C-Series). Screws and such I usually just stick in cardboard - things like that.

The C-Series has held up surprisingly well next to the H-Series. Not quite as tough they say, but way better than expected!
 
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Waorani

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Just did a small part a couple days ago and tested the hot-melt glue before baking - it melted and would have made a mess. Was able to put a small, shallow hole in hidden location and start a small self-tapping screw that allowed holding but that wouldn't work on most stuff.
 
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AIAW

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A lot of guys that use the oven-cure with polymer (Glock for instance) will use a lower temp (175F or so) but extended the bake time. It seems that most glue sticks melt at would 240 F. Never tried it, but perhaps the lower temperature in the oven would work?
 
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Waorani

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Tried 200 couple days ago but was in a hurry and didn't experiment further. Just tried 175 and it still melted. Believe these are just the standard 350 degree sticks but maybe not. Simple enough solution that I might try to find some higher temp sticks.

On a related note, I tried one of the disposable Preval sprayers and it worked great. Only issue was too little volume for the 6oz jar and it sucked air when tilted. Found some smaller cups and will give those a try on something bigger next time around.

https://www.homedepot.com/p/Preval-9-oz-Complete-Spray-Gun-267/202533738
 

PCR

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I have several small sets of vise grip pliers for small parts. Works great and quick!
 

havoctec

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Ive been using modified alligator clips trimming most of it away leaving just enough to hold the parts. That also allows for the majority of the part to get covered with the coating
 

Wannashootit

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I've on occasion used small, rare-earth magnets to hold items that aren't able to be securely held by a wire (and are ferromagnetic), and have spot (like the end of pin) that doesn't need to be coated.
 

FCrifles

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The alligator clips work good, get some lengths of drill rod and tack weld however many you want on. Now you have something that can handle mutiple small items.

A piece of thin fairly stiff cardboard works great for ring cap screws and such too. I cut up the empty latex glove boxes for that. Take your piece of cardboard, poke however many holes you want in it, then push each screw through. Easy to handle and coat the heads and bottoms of screw(s) holding just the cardboard. After curing, pop out screws, throw away the cardboard.
 
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