Anyone Read A Good NON-Fiction Book Lately?

#21
Storm of Steel by Ernst Junger. Absolutely awesome. First hand account of a German soldier in WW1. German humor is extremely strange and dry. But regardless, its easy to respect the valor in combat displayed by a young teenager in what musta seemed like the end of the world. Might even go so far as to say he was a real bloodthirsty son of a gun.
As a companion to the above, A Rifleman Went to War by Mcbride. From the American/Canadian side. Mcbride was a helluva man, that Id be happy to be considered 1/10 the man he was. Nuff said.
 
#22
"Catastrophe 1914: Europe goes to War" by Max Hastings. Latest addition to the Great War library. I don't know how many times I've plowed through "The Guns of August" by Tuchman. To ignore history is to repeat it.
 

sirhrmechanic

Command Sgt. Major
#25
Buddy of mine sent me Rogue Heroes, a superbly-researched book about the early days of the SAS. A lot of what Virginia Cowels wrote in "The Phantom Major" but with citations and a lot more back story.

David Stirling was a bit of a git, apparently.

Superb read by the same guy who wrote Doublecross -- Ben McIntyre. He is a superb researcher and storyteller. He finally got through The Procurer! And got to do an authorized bio on the SAS and its wartime exploits. Some will understand who "The Procurer" is.

Cheers,

Sirhr
 

sandwarrior

Gunny Sergeant
#26
Code Talker by Chester Nez. After being broke down for forty days in Gallup, NM, I had a lot of chances to read about these guys. And meet those who knew them.
 
#27
A Code to Keep by Ernest C Brace
Story of a contactor pilot in Vietnam who was shot down and held as a POW for years. Two years in cages in the jungle. Later in the Hanoi Hilton. Near starvation, torture, and deprivation.
 

sirhrmechanic

Command Sgt. Major
#30
Reading Ron White's (not that one) book American Ulysses about Grant.


Brilliant biography about a man who has been written about... a lot.

The best part of it is that, for a change, the publisher did not skimp on maps. The book is FULL of maps. Superb, fantastic, easy-to-read maps. Every time you think 'man, wouldn't it be great if they had a Map of Vicksburg. . a map of Wilderness... a map of Antietam.... wow, right there is a map!

Utterly brilliant book. Highly recommend.

Cheers,

Sirhr

P.S. Yes, With The Old Breed is a classic. If you like that, also read "Helmet for my Pillow." Also William Manchester's "Goodbye, Darkness" was written in the 1970's and documented his return to the battlefields of the Pacific war. After serving as a sergeant in the Marines and seeing combat on Okinaia, Manchester became one of the greatest authors of the 20th Century. His return to the battlefield(s) of his youth, 30 years later, is eerie and brilliant. Many of the battlefields still bore fresh scars. So did Manchester. Though he did not fight at many of the locations he documents, he uses his own experiences to tell the stories of others. He got a lot of crap for his book being 'fiction' and some of it is. But what 'is' fiction was written by a person who lived the reality and bore the scars. Can't recommend that book highly enough. And the lefty professors who tried to ruin his memory can kiss my ass. Whining at Berkeley was not fighting on Okinawa... Manchester was there. American Spectator 'journalists' were not.
 

Maggot

Philo-Sophia
#31
'A History of Russia'. Nicholas V, Riasanovsky. Russia has an amazingly diverse history which contributes to its interesting culture and current situation. Absolute horror from abut 1850 on. They probably have it better today than they have in centuries.

 

pmclaine

Gunny Sergeant
#33
'A History of Russia'. Nicholas V, Riasanovsky. Russia has an amazingly diverse history which contributes to its interesting culture and current situation. Absolute horror from abut 1850 on. They probably have it better today than they have in centuries.
There was little to be happy about prior to 1850 either.

History is everything to understanding Russia.

They ended slavery 1865 just like us. They went all in on the Great Society. Look what it got them.


lets be relevant to the OP

Shots Fired in Anger

https://www.amazon.com/Shots-Fired-Anger-Riflemans-Guadalcanal/dp/093599842X
 
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earthquake

Gunny Sergeant
#36
Recently finished:

Miracle at Belleau Wood: The birth of the modern US Marine Corps.

Hillbilly Elegy: A memoir of a family and culture in crisis

In the middle of-

Thank You for your Service

Miracle at BW is a great read. I had no idea how brutal WWI trench warfare was or how bad that fight in France was for the 5th and 6th Regiments, of which I later served with. The massive amount of pride I feel now for being part of the 6th Marines after learning what they did before me is incredibly humbling.

Hillbilly is about Appalachian America and the crisis facing them today, viewed through the eyes of someone who escaped, became a Marine and eventually graduated Yale Law school.

Thank You is a heartbreaking read about an Army unit and Soldiers facing PTSD, life after the war and their struggles. I'm not done with it, but it is very interesting to me. I did not serve in Iraq or A-Stan and am curious to learn more about the war's effects on so many troops. I wish I could help.