300 PRC update

goinghunting

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Anybody had a case separation yet? (See my previous post questioning pressure signs) Hit 4X on some Hornady last weekend, didn't notice till last night that I had 7 definitely ringed/toast, and about 15 others that are now very suspect which is close to a 30% failure rate on that lot and I'm not pushing them near what some of you guys are. Dropped the gun off this morning to have the chamber, bolt, chassis, looked over in detail. I/We would really would like to see pics from anyone of 2x, 3x fired Hndy brass bases if anyone has time. Thx.
Anybody had a case separation yet? (See my previous post questioning pressure signs) Hit 4X on some Hornady last weekend, didn't notice till last night that I had 7 definitely ringed/toast, and about 15 others that are now very suspect which is close to a 30% failure rate on that lot and I'm not pushing them near what some of you guys are. Dropped the gun off this morning to have the chamber, bolt, chassis, looked over in detail. I/We would really would like to see pics from anyone of 2x, 3x fired Hndy brass bases if anyone has time. Thx.
2x fired. Factory Match 225 ELDm bumped .002 followed by RL26 between 72 and 74 gn pushing 212ELDx 2800-2870.

Gonna be running 212ELDX +/- 2865 with around 73.4 gn RL 26. Haven't fine tuned yet.

IMG_20191116_202822106.jpg


IMG_20191116_202751772.jpg
 

doctordoctor

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Anybody out there running a 300PRC with a DT SRS or Covert? I am in the UK and looking to go down this route. Many ranges over here will not allow the .338LM but will allow .30 cals. I am assuming the long action mag works fine as does the 300WM bolt assembly. I, again, assume barrel length between 22 and 26 inches.
My brother and I are. I'm running a 30 inch barrel in a srs. It's magical
 

Merovingian

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I'm interested in what you guys are trimming at. I trim at 2.565" and I got zero growth on the last few reloadings. I know that is the Hornady spec but I've seen Hodgdon and others list 2.850" as trim length on their webapp and that is the Max case length.

I'll try and get out to the range and make some more empty brass...but dang do I hate the cold. I'll take pics of my brass for a 6x reload when I can.
For obvious reasons I may not be the best reference on this but mine were 2.577 out of the box, first round growth was .010-.013. Trimmed to 2.575 and bumped the shoulder .002 on 2x growth was .007-.009. Trimmed them back to 2.575 again for consistency and reduced bump to .001. Growth stabilized and after 4X all are 2.577 to 2.579. 2.580 is long for a 2.5874 chamber, you'd be trimming every time or risk crimping on the shoulder.
 
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Cauld

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I put together a 300 prc in April but didn't draw any hunts. A friend used it for a hunt in Wolf point Montana this weekend. 26 inch Bartlein 10 twist is from Greg at SPR. We used a 200gr Barnes LRX, 80.3gr H1000 COAL 3.570 for .045" jump. 200 yard broadside hit on his left and the bullet was in the hide on his right with some shattered ribs. Lungs were liquefied.
 

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Rocketmandb

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I wrote a few weeks back that I'm doing a new 300 PRC build to go up a notch in rifle quality over my current 300 PRC.

This weekend I ordered a custom stock from Manners - I know this will take a while, but long actions are non-existent and I think finding one that meets my needs will take just as long as ordering one.

I also ordered M5 bottom metal and the same barrel I have on my current (M24, 1-9).
 
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Rocketmandb

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@Rocketmandb any reason you didn't go with a high end chassis system?
It depends on the chassis, of course, but I'm not a fan of many of them. I like simplicity combined with functionality. I get everything I need out of a more traditional stock and it is simpler to deal with and easier to clean. Additionally, I'm sold on the KMW Loggerhead cheek riser, which comes standard on Manners stocks.
 

Dippy

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It depends on the chassis, of course, but I'm not a fan of many of them. I like simplicity combined with functionality. I get everything I need out of a more traditional stock and it is simpler to deal with and easier to clean. Additionally, I'm sold on the KMW Loggerhead cheek riser, which comes standard on Manners stocks.

Which Manners you go with?
 

senna.bra

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I'd like to see Berger load 300 PRC but I won't hold my breath. The Berger 338 LM with the 300 grain OTM is a very good value. I'm seeing SDs less than 10. The Hornady ELDMs in 300 PRC are running SDs around 18 or 19.
Nope! Shot the factory hornady load out to 1950 yards and SD around 12. Maybe you are seeing higher Sds in your kit.
 

goinghunting

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Nope! Shot the factory hornady load out to 1950 yards and SD around 12. Maybe you are seeing higher Sds in your kit.
What twist are you guys running? I was hoping to get a load worked up that hammers with the 212 ELDX but I just haven't had time to fine tune...

So might end up using that factory 225 ELDM on elk in a week. Or a different rifle that I know is lights out.
 

TripleBull

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Nope! Shot the factory hornady load out to 1950 yards and SD around 12. Maybe you are seeing higher Sds in your kit.
There is no maybe. We've chrono'ed every round with a LR and have 200 down the tube, shooting 40 to 60 rounds a day. Comparing box to box, the range of SDs has been from around 18 to 21 with a global box average SD just under 20. In spite of that, the factory ammo has performed better than it's specs would suggest. Last time out we quickly got on target at 2400 then spanked that bitch steel like a red-headed stepchild.

Goinghunting, we have a 30" Bartlein 1:9 in an AX-MC. I'm staring at a box of 230 A-Tips and thinking about how good it will shoot with handloads. With the 338LM barrel in the AX, handloads typically run in the 5 to 8 SD range.
 

LakuNoc

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I went to range today with RCC brass and 230gr A-Tip to see how will brass hold pressure.
This is my load and in my rifle, please be careful because it might be different in your rifle.
RCC Brass loaded with H1000, CCI BR-2 primers and 230gr A-TiP.
Like i said in part one i will do concentricity of rounds loaded and i did, not to write out all numbers but out of 10 rounds 8 rounds where with 1 thousands of an inch and 2 rounds were runout of 1.5 thousands of and inch. In my books that's very good.

My Weather 40 F, 28.6inHg, 64% Humidity My Altitude 1030ft

76.4 GN = 2869 FPS no pressure
76.7 GN = 2876 FPS no pressure
77.0 GN = 2896 FPS no pressure
77.3 GN = 2899 FPS no pressure
77.6 GN = 2890 FPS no pressure
77.9 GN = 2913 FPS no pressure
78.2 GN = 2940 FPS no pressure NODE
78.5 GN = 2938 FPS no pressure NODE
78.8 GN = 2945 FPS no pressure NODE
80.1 GN = 2966 FPS no pressure

Now some Comparison here with Hornady Brass.
HORNADY BRASS Same powder, bullet, primers everything same but HORNADY BRASS
77.9 GN = 2859 FPS
78.2 GN = 2863 FPS
78.5 GN = 2879 FPS
78.8 GN = 2899 FPS
80.1 GN = 2919 FPS PRESSURE Signs at 80.1GN, bolt lift started being slightly
heavy/injector mark this is on Hornady Brass just to be clear.

I run out of time today because i did lots of reloading on one case to test primer pocket on RCC brass, but i did get chance at the end to load 3 rounds of 78.5GN and numbers were amazing!
2941 FPS
2941 FPS
2939 FPS
I will load 10 rounds of 78.5GN and confirm this load. Will keep you guys posted how i do with 10 rounds.

As you can see difference from RCC brass to Hornady Brass 46FPS at 78.8GN of H1000.
RCC brass holds pressure much much better than Hornady Brass. At 80.1 GN with RCC brass no pressure of signs at all. I have been loading 80GN of H1000 and shooting of my back porch same round over and over and over. At 20 firings from same case and RCC primer pocket still tight! This is impressive and that's where i stop at 20 firings.
Big question is RCC brass worth $5.65? To me YES and i will explain why. I payed with shipping for 100 rounds right around $600. Comparing that to Hornady brass is big difference but Hornady brass primers were falling out after 4th firing and i could not get Extreme spread under 15FPS. Thats due to very inconsistent internal case volume that i my self measured and it was very inconsistent. h2o test on my scale was + or - 29 GN. I did turn necks on Hornady brass annealed it did primmer pockets flash hole i did everything i could to it and it was no where close to quality to RCC brass. I love long range/precision shooting and to engage small target consistently shoot after shoot past 1400 yards you want you extreme spread to be low as you can get. Many guys that compete in long range shooting they want to be under 10 FPS extreme spread.

More to come on this testing, just to be clear again i payed with my own $$$ for all my brass and I'm doing this because i love long range shooting and giving something back here. Because i learned a lot about 300 PRC from here.
 

DDRH65CM

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I went to range today with RCC brass and 230gr A-Tip to see how will brass hold pressure.
This is my load and in my rifle, please be careful because it might be different in your rifle.
RCC Brass loaded with H1000, CCI BR-2 primers and 230gr A-TiP.
Like i said in part one i will do concentricity of rounds loaded and i did, not to write out all numbers but out of 10 rounds 8 rounds where with 1 thousands of an inch and 2 rounds were runout of 1.5 thousands of and inch. In my books that's very good.

My Weather 40 F, 28.6inHg, 64% Humidity My Altitude 1030ft

76.4 GN = 2869 FPS no pressure
76.7 GN = 2876 FPS no pressure
77.0 GN = 2896 FPS no pressure
77.3 GN = 2899 FPS no pressure
77.6 GN = 2890 FPS no pressure
77.9 GN = 2913 FPS no pressure
78.2 GN = 2940 FPS no pressure NODE
78.5 GN = 2938 FPS no pressure NODE
78.8 GN = 2945 FPS no pressure NODE
80.1 GN = 2966 FPS no pressure

Now some Comparison here with Hornady Brass.
HORNADY BRASS Same powder, bullet, primers everything same but HORNADY BRASS
77.9 GN = 2859 FPS
78.2 GN = 2863 FPS
78.5 GN = 2879 FPS
78.8 GN = 2899 FPS
80.1 GN = 2919 FPS PRESSURE Signs at 80.1GN, bolt lift started being slightly
heavy/injector mark this is on Hornady Brass just to be clear.

I run out of time today because i did lots of reloading on one case to test primer pocket on RCC brass, but i did get chance at the end to load 3 rounds of 78.5GN and numbers were amazing!
2941 FPS
2941 FPS
2939 FPS
I will load 10 rounds of 78.5GN and confirm this load. Will keep you guys posted how i do with 10 rounds.

As you can see difference from RCC brass to Hornady Brass 46FPS at 78.8GN of H1000.
RCC brass holds pressure much much better than Hornady Brass. At 80.1 GN with RCC brass no pressure of signs at all. I have been loading 80GN of H1000 and shooting of my back porch same round over and over and over. At 20 firings from same case and RCC primer pocket still tight! This is impressive and that's where i stop at 20 firings.
Big question is RCC brass worth $5.65? To me YES and i will explain why. I payed with shipping for 100 rounds right around $600. Comparing that to Hornady brass is big difference but Hornady brass primers were falling out after 4th firing and i could not get Extreme spread under 15FPS. Thats due to very inconsistent internal case volume that i my self measured and it was very inconsistent. h2o test on my scale was + or - 29 GN. I did turn necks on Hornady brass annealed it did primmer pockets flash hole i did everything i could to it and it was no where close to quality to RCC brass. I love long range/precision shooting and to engage small target consistently shoot after shoot past 1400 yards you want you extreme spread to be low as you can get. Many guys that compete in long range shooting they want to be under 10 FPS extreme spread.

More to come on this testing, just to be clear again i payed with my own $$$ for all my brass and I'm doing this because i love long range shooting and giving something back here. Because i learned a lot about 300 PRC from here.
Apologize if i missed this.

What barrel length?

Custom or Factory bbl? Chamber is SAAMI spec?

Custom chamber spec?

Thanks!
 

senna.bra

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What twist are you guys running? I was hoping to get a load worked up that hammers with the 212 ELDX but I just haven't had time to fine tune...

So might end up using that factory 225 ELDM on elk in a week. Or a different rifle that I know is lights out.
What twist are you guys running? I was hoping to get a load worked up that hammers with the 212 ELDX but I just haven't had time to fine tune...

So might end up using that factory 225 ELDM on elk in a week. Or a different rifle that I know is lights out.
1-9 Hawkhill at 28”.
 

b6graham

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I went to range today with RCC brass and 230gr A-Tip to see how will brass hold pressure.
This is my load and in my rifle, please be careful because it might be different in your rifle.
RCC Brass loaded with H1000, CCI BR-2 primers and 230gr A-TiP.
Like i said in part one i will do concentricity of rounds loaded and i did, not to write out all numbers but out of 10 rounds 8 rounds where with 1 thousands of an inch and 2 rounds were runout of 1.5 thousands of and inch. In my books that's very good.

My Weather 40 F, 28.6inHg, 64% Humidity My Altitude 1030ft

76.4 GN = 2869 FPS no pressure
76.7 GN = 2876 FPS no pressure
77.0 GN = 2896 FPS no pressure
77.3 GN = 2899 FPS no pressure
77.6 GN = 2890 FPS no pressure
77.9 GN = 2913 FPS no pressure
78.2 GN = 2940 FPS no pressure NODE
78.5 GN = 2938 FPS no pressure NODE
78.8 GN = 2945 FPS no pressure NODE
80.1 GN = 2966 FPS no pressure

Now some Comparison here with Hornady Brass.
HORNADY BRASS Same powder, bullet, primers everything same but HORNADY BRASS
77.9 GN = 2859 FPS
78.2 GN = 2863 FPS
78.5 GN = 2879 FPS
78.8 GN = 2899 FPS
80.1 GN = 2919 FPS PRESSURE Signs at 80.1GN, bolt lift started being slightly
heavy/injector mark this is on Hornady Brass just to be clear.

I run out of time today because i did lots of reloading on one case to test primer pocket on RCC brass, but i did get chance at the end to load 3 rounds of 78.5GN and numbers were amazing!
2941 FPS
2941 FPS
2939 FPS
I will load 10 rounds of 78.5GN and confirm this load. Will keep you guys posted how i do with 10 rounds.

As you can see difference from RCC brass to Hornady Brass 46FPS at 78.8GN of H1000.
RCC brass holds pressure much much better than Hornady Brass. At 80.1 GN with RCC brass no pressure of signs at all. I have been loading 80GN of H1000 and shooting of my back porch same round over and over and over. At 20 firings from same case and RCC primer pocket still tight! This is impressive and that's where i stop at 20 firings.
Big question is RCC brass worth $5.65? To me YES and i will explain why. I payed with shipping for 100 rounds right around $600. Comparing that to Hornady brass is big difference but Hornady brass primers were falling out after 4th firing and i could not get Extreme spread under 15FPS. Thats due to very inconsistent internal case volume that i my self measured and it was very inconsistent. h2o test on my scale was + or - 29 GN. I did turn necks on Hornady brass annealed it did primmer pockets flash hole i did everything i could to it and it was no where close to quality to RCC brass. I love long range/precision shooting and to engage small target consistently shoot after shoot past 1400 yards you want you extreme spread to be low as you can get. Many guys that compete in long range shooting they want to be under 10 FPS extreme spread.

More to come on this testing, just to be clear again i payed with my own $$$ for all my brass and I'm doing this because i love long range shooting and giving something back here. Because i learned a lot about 300 PRC from here.
any plan to load 78.5 back to back to back etc to see when a primer finally does fail?
 

Dippy

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Target rifle build Bartlein 30” 9 twist HV
Hunting rifle build Bartlein 28” 9 twist modified sendero profile, fluted.
 

b6graham

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I did and i stoped at 20 firings primer pocket was still tight and no issues.
ha well...there's the answer to is the price worth it

now...do they/will they make it for the Sherman chamber in both 30cal and 7mm
 

phlegethon

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ha well...there's the answer to is the price worth it

now...do they/will they make it for the Sherman chamber in both 30cal and 7mm
They custom make it to specs, as I understand it. They can make brass for whatever cartridge you want, real or imagined.
 

b6graham

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They custom make it to specs, as I understand it. They can make brass for whatever cartridge you want, real or imagined.
they can.

i'd just rather Sherman pay the setup fee haha. even with the ADG and fireforming. getting 4-5 times the primer pocket life AND more consistent brass seems like a win win for all of his magnums. and it's only about 2-2.5x the cost
 

jwknutson17

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That's awesome news on the 20x with that load.

I almost convinced myself to buy some, but with the ADG announcement I need to see what that looks like first. I have 16x fired brass with a really stout load in 300 win mag with ADG brass and still going strong. If Peterson came out with some also, I would probably go that route too, as it would be less then half the cost of RCC.

But with those results you are getting so far, seems like a win though.
 

Tokay444

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Not that anyone cares, but a Hornady case will hold 95.0 gr of RL 33. I will try an ADG case when they arrive.

Why does this matter? Cause a 6.5 creed Lapua case will hold exactly 50.0 gr of RL 26 and push a 156gr at 3000fps with that 50gr of powder with no pressure and single digit SD. If science can do that, then it can push a 250gr A tip at 3000 FPS out of a PRC. I don’t know what the ballistics are on that, but it changes things.
Holy shit!
Now I need to get some 156ers and some RL26. Is it as dirty as RL16, because that had me switch back to H4350 since there was only a marginal speed difference.
 

LakuNoc

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ha well...there's the answer to is the price worth it

now...do they/will they make it for the Sherman chamber in both 30cal and 7mm
Yes they will. Talk to Jeff and send him some fired cases of your chamber he will make it happen. You won’t regret trust me, brass is best out there.
 
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jwknutson17

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Holy shit!
Now I need to get some 156ers and some RL26. Is it as dirty as RL16, because that had me switch back to H4350 since there was only a marginal speed difference.
Dont take that guys bad advice. You will not get 3k with a 156 in 6.5 CM and RL26. Just like he won't get 3k with a 250gr atip in the PRC. Not sure where he is coming up with this stuff but it's bad advice all around.
 
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Tokay444

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Dont take that guys bad advice. You will not get 3k with a 156 in 6.5 CM and RL26. Just like he won't get 3k with a 250gr atip in the PRC. Not sure where he is coming up with this stuff but it's bad advice all around.
People are getting 147grners that fast...
 

jwknutson17

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People are getting 147grners that fast...
It's pretty well known that around 48.5gr of RL26 is at max pending what brass you use with the 147s. 26 inch tube gets you into the 2900-2930 range. Anything above that is over max pressure for most. Maybe guys with 30 inch tubes pushing the limits into a lot of pressure get 3k. Now your adding a heavier pill and he says 50gr of RL26 powder. So yes that's bad advise in my book. I like to push the limits too, but hey, it's your rifle and I hope you get it!


Now back to the 300 PRC..
 
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badassgunworks

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I went to range today with RCC brass and 230gr A-Tip to see how will brass hold pressure.
This is my load and in my rifle, please be careful because it might be different in your rifle.
RCC Brass loaded with H1000, CCI BR-2 primers and 230gr A-TiP.
Like i said in part one i will do concentricity of rounds loaded and i did, not to write out all numbers but out of 10 rounds 8 rounds where with 1 thousands of an inch and 2 rounds were runout of 1.5 thousands of and inch. In my books that's very good.

My Weather 40 F, 28.6inHg, 64% Humidity My Altitude 1030ft

76.4 GN = 2869 FPS no pressure
76.7 GN = 2876 FPS no pressure
77.0 GN = 2896 FPS no pressure
77.3 GN = 2899 FPS no pressure
77.6 GN = 2890 FPS no pressure
77.9 GN = 2913 FPS no pressure
78.2 GN = 2940 FPS no pressure NODE
78.5 GN = 2938 FPS no pressure NODE
78.8 GN = 2945 FPS no pressure NODE
80.1 GN = 2966 FPS no pressure

Now some Comparison here with Hornady Brass.
HORNADY BRASS Same powder, bullet, primers everything same but HORNADY BRASS
77.9 GN = 2859 FPS
78.2 GN = 2863 FPS
78.5 GN = 2879 FPS
78.8 GN = 2899 FPS
80.1 GN = 2919 FPS PRESSURE Signs at 80.1GN, bolt lift started being slightly
heavy/injector mark this is on Hornady Brass just to be clear.

I run out of time today because i did lots of reloading on one case to test primer pocket on RCC brass, but i did get chance at the end to load 3 rounds of 78.5GN and numbers were amazing!
2941 FPS
2941 FPS
2939 FPS
I will load 10 rounds of 78.5GN and confirm this load. Will keep you guys posted how i do with 10 rounds.

As you can see difference from RCC brass to Hornady Brass 46FPS at 78.8GN of H1000.
RCC brass holds pressure much much better than Hornady Brass. At 80.1 GN with RCC brass no pressure of signs at all. I have been loading 80GN of H1000 and shooting of my back porch same round over and over and over. At 20 firings from same case and RCC primer pocket still tight! This is impressive and that's where i stop at 20 firings.
Big question is RCC brass worth $5.65? To me YES and i will explain why. I payed with shipping for 100 rounds right around $600. Comparing that to Hornady brass is big difference but Hornady brass primers were falling out after 4th firing and i could not get Extreme spread under 15FPS. Thats due to very inconsistent internal case volume that i my self measured and it was very inconsistent. h2o test on my scale was + or - 29 GN. I did turn necks on Hornady brass annealed it did primmer pockets flash hole i did everything i could to it and it was no where close to quality to RCC brass. I love long range/precision shooting and to engage small target consistently shoot after shoot past 1400 yards you want you extreme spread to be low as you can get. Many guys that compete in long range shooting they want to be under 10 FPS extreme spread.

More to come on this testing, just to be clear again i payed with my own $$$ for all my brass and I'm doing this because i love long range shooting and giving something back here. Because i learned a lot about 300 PRC from here.
Rcc is doing some great things for the industry living on the past of greedy cartridge companies building brass that fails early to increase sales is bad pay more now And get a better product with Rcc and spend more time shooting vrs brass prep fire forming and developing loads Just think perhaps depending on what your shooting you brass batch will put last your barrel
 

Rocketmandb

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Rcc is doing some great things for the industry living on the past of greedy cartridge companies building brass that fails early to increase sales is bad pay more now And get a better product with Rcc and spend more time shooting vrs brass prep fire forming and developing loads Just think perhaps depending on what your shooting you brass batch will put last your barrel
My only issue with them is that I placed an order with them during the early summer, and they didn't get back to me until they ran this batch (~5 months). I chose to go another route in fire forming 8x68S - which works very well.

To RCC's credit, they did call, but it was too late for me, as I'm already invested in RWS brass.
 

Tokay444

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Rcc is doing some great things for the industry living on the past of greedy cartridge companies building brass that fails early to increase sales is bad pay more now And get a better product with Rcc and spend more time shooting vrs brass prep fire forming and developing loads Just think perhaps depending on what your shooting you brass batch will put last your barrel
That's not why they do it at all. It's many orders of magnitude cheaper to mass produce brass casings in the traditional manner than to machine each individual piece from solid.
RCC would never be able to keep up with real world demands with their process. They're a niche market manufacturer.
 

NoLegs24

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Yeah, I'd be pissed if the results weren't magical for what you're paying per piece. Cause theres a pretty nice gap in pricing.

Looking at 300NM, I wou;d be paying $3.73 more if I went the RCC route. But I am a volume shooter as I'll be competing with it. Meaning I would have to at least take 225 rounds to the NF ELR Match.

I am all for buying quality stuff, but man, I would have to at least buy 500 pieces, and I am buying 1k batches at minimum now. So I decided to just buy Lapua 300NM brass. I can't see myself spending $2,775 for 500 pieces or $5,550 for 1k.

Maybe when I build a 375Enablr, I'll take a hard look at RCC as I would only be buying 250... but, it'll also be hard as Peterson makes brass for Applied Ballistic which looks like it'll be $7 cheaper per piece LOL...

To each their own though.... Solid stuff!
 

jwknutson17

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Have you worked up any loads yet?
I have been shooting 215 bergers. Hornady Brass. CCI250. 79.26 gr of H1000 (1gr over max) 2980 FPS. Haven't used RL26 on it yet as I'm shooting out this lot of H1k before I switch. I had a really good node at 3012 fps and will try to find it with RL26. Was too hot for H1k so I backed down a bit to save my primer pockets. Was only getting 4 loads on the brass when I was at 80 to 80.5grs and had pressure signs.

Edit. My COAL is 3.705. My lands are at 3.727. So puts me 22 thou off.
 
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LakuNoc

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Today i had some time so i cut open Hornady and RCC brass. RCC brass as i stated in previous post holds pressure much better. I did some measurements and it was impressive. At 80.01 no pressure with RCC brass. I also called Jeff at RCC to gather more info on this brass and everything made more sense. After i cut them open, here on picture you can see side by side RCC constructed like a Tank. Especially around primer pocket its very visible, difference is huge and here are pictures.
IMG-2381.jpg

IMG-2380.jpg
As you can see RCC constructed much much stronger and better. But not only that RCC brass is made out of stronger material. Primer pockets hold much better because around primer pocket its much more thicker material than Hornady Brass.
I also got in contact with Jeff at RCC and he is just very smart and know his stuff when it comes to making top line bras that's for sure.

This is from RCC because i had questions how its made and why it's so different and so good.
HERE IS SOME VERY INTERESTING INFO ABOUT RCC BRASS FROM JEFF at RCC
The problem a lot of people have is finding quality brass for the caliber they shoot. We manufacture high quality cartridges for vintage, obsolete, hard to find and wildcat calibers. All cartridges are made to SAAMI, CIP or tolerances provided to us. Our unique process allows us to manufacture over 1,400 different cartridges at tolerances up to 0.0005”. We can manufacture brass cartridges for any firearm, and if you are seeking quality products made in the USA, then you are at the right place.

The draw process has been used for cartridge manufacturing since the 19th century and manufacturers have been able to develop this process to produce high volumes of brass cases. Draw cartridge manufactures have tested many different types of materials over the years and the best material for this process is a brass alloy with a mixture of 70% copper and 30% zinc.

When brass is annealed at 250° C there is no visible change to the bonding of the grain structure, tensile strength and elasticity. At 300° C there is a microscopic change to the grain structure and at 350° the work hardness becomes softer and a fine grain structure can be seen. As temperatures increase the brass becomes fully annealed at 750° C and large crystals can be seen. Temperatures above this point will cause damage to the brass and at 800°C the brass is burned and should be scrapped.

When brass is cold-worked it hardens and done by bending, drawing, compressing and so forth. This increases the tensile strength and decreases it’s elasticity. To accommodate todays high pressure cartridges brass must both have a high tensile strength to withstand pressure spikes and elasticity to seal the chamber from any gas blow back.

The draw process begins using a brass cup that is annealed and cleaned to remove any scale build up that might have occurred. During the first draw the cup is pushed through a die with a punch and extruded to lengthen the cup. It has become work hardened and has to be annealed and washed for the second draw. Typically a cartridge will go through 4 draws before it is ready to go to the next stage. The case head will be turned, primer pockets, flash holes, head stamps and necks are done to complete the manufacturing process. When the neck is formed the cartridge is annealed again and is then polished for shipping. During each annealing, the temperature is reduced to work harden the case for higher tensile strength and elasticity. The final annealing is to the body of the case and is at a lower temperature, so it won’t affect the case head hardness.

While the draw process is capable of mass production, it is not able to easily produce consistence case head hardness, case weight, case volume and case concentricity. At RCC Brass™ we have taken those variables out of the manufacturing process as we have our C260 cartridge brass hammer forged into a tight molecular grain structure with a high tensile strength and 15% elasticity. We machine all our cases on CNC lathes and mills and our case weight, case volume and our case concentricity are the best available in the industry. We don’t anneal the case head as it is hammer forged to a high tensile strength which gives us the same hardness for each case. Since we are use CNC equipment to manufacture our, case weight is nearly identical, the case volume is too, and our case concentricity is held to a 0.001”.

Since we are not held back by the limitations of a draw system, we are able to use higher strength alloys to manufacture cartridges. Our new C272 brass alloy has a much higher tensile strength and tighter molecular grain structure than C260 brass, without losing the needed elasticity. Test results have been very positive as we’ve had reports of increased in velocity and energy and lower shot deviations versus C260 drawn brass. But the test is what you can do with RCC Brass™.


We are proudly Made in the U.S.A.

RCC brass is not for anyone but if you want the best i don't regret spending my $$$ on RCC because its nothing short of impressive.
Will be doing some more testing here soon and will keep you posted guys about SD and extreme spread.
 

b2lee

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Dec 30, 2018
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That is excellent information conveyed by the cut away brass. That case head is huge. The only questions I have for you is: 1. Do you plan on counter sinking the inside flash hole? 2. Normally I use Federal #210 match primers...but the length of that flash hole...man...can you see if there is much difference between a regular and a magnum primer?

Thanks for the post. I don't think a lot of people truly understand...or maybe appreciate the difference in retail brass and the huge difference in both the materials used and the process that RCC uses to produce this brass.
 
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jwknutson17

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Belligerents
Apr 29, 2017
2,121
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Today i had some time so i cut open Hornady and RCC brass. RCC brass as i stated in previous post holds pressure much better. I did some measurements and it was impressive. At 80.01 no pressure with RCC brass. I also called Jeff at RCC to gather more info on this brass and everything made more sense. After i cut them open, here on picture you can see side by side RCC constructed like a Tank. Especially around primer pocket its very visible, difference is huge and here are pictures.
View attachment 7187041

View attachment 7187030
As you can see RCC constructed much much stronger and better. But not only that RCC brass is made out of stronger material. Primer pockets hold much better because around primer pocket its much more thicker material than Hornady Brass.
I also got in contact with Jeff at RCC and he is just very smart and know his stuff when it comes to making top line bras that's for sure.

This is from RCC because i had questions how its made and why it's so different and so good.
HERE IS SOME VERY INTERESTING INFO ABOUT RCC BRASS FROM JEFF at RCC
The problem a lot of people have is finding quality brass for the caliber they shoot. We manufacture high quality cartridges for vintage, obsolete, hard to find and wildcat calibers. All cartridges are made to SAAMI, CIP or tolerances provided to us. Our unique process allows us to manufacture over 1,400 different cartridges at tolerances up to 0.0005”. We can manufacture brass cartridges for any firearm, and if you are seeking quality products made in the USA, then you are at the right place.

The draw process has been used for cartridge manufacturing since the 19th century and manufacturers have been able to develop this process to produce high volumes of brass cases. Draw cartridge manufactures have tested many different types of materials over the years and the best material for this process is a brass alloy with a mixture of 70% copper and 30% zinc.

When brass is annealed at 250° C there is no visible change to the bonding of the grain structure, tensile strength and elasticity. At 300° C there is a microscopic change to the grain structure and at 350° the work hardness becomes softer and a fine grain structure can be seen. As temperatures increase the brass becomes fully annealed at 750° C and large crystals can be seen. Temperatures above this point will cause damage to the brass and at 800°C the brass is burned and should be scrapped.

When brass is cold-worked it hardens and done by bending, drawing, compressing and so forth. This increases the tensile strength and decreases it’s elasticity. To accommodate todays high pressure cartridges brass must both have a high tensile strength to withstand pressure spikes and elasticity to seal the chamber from any gas blow back.

The draw process begins using a brass cup that is annealed and cleaned to remove any scale build up that might have occurred. During the first draw the cup is pushed through a die with a punch and extruded to lengthen the cup. It has become work hardened and has to be annealed and washed for the second draw. Typically a cartridge will go through 4 draws before it is ready to go to the next stage. The case head will be turned, primer pockets, flash holes, head stamps and necks are done to complete the manufacturing process. When the neck is formed the cartridge is annealed again and is then polished for shipping. During each annealing, the temperature is reduced to work harden the case for higher tensile strength and elasticity. The final annealing is to the body of the case and is at a lower temperature, so it won’t affect the case head hardness.

While the draw process is capable of mass production, it is not able to easily produce consistence case head hardness, case weight, case volume and case concentricity. At RCC Brass™ we have taken those variables out of the manufacturing process as we have our C260 cartridge brass hammer forged into a tight molecular grain structure with a high tensile strength and 15% elasticity. We machine all our cases on CNC lathes and mills and our case weight, case volume and our case concentricity are the best available in the industry. We don’t anneal the case head as it is hammer forged to a high tensile strength which gives us the same hardness for each case. Since we are use CNC equipment to manufacture our, case weight is nearly identical, the case volume is too, and our case concentricity is held to a 0.001”.

Since we are not held back by the limitations of a draw system, we are able to use higher strength alloys to manufacture cartridges. Our new C272 brass alloy has a much higher tensile strength and tighter molecular grain structure than C260 brass, without losing the needed elasticity. Test results have been very positive as we’ve had reports of increased in velocity and energy and lower shot deviations versus C260 drawn brass. But the test is what you can do with RCC Brass™.


We are proudly Made in the U.S.A.

RCC brass is not for anyone but if you want the best i don't regret spending my $$$ on RCC because its nothing short of impressive.
Will be doing some more testing here soon and will keep you posted guys about SD and extreme spread.
Thanks for taking the time in that post. Very informative.

Have you, or are you planning on annealing at any point with this brass in your testing?
 
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max1840

Private
Belligerents
Jun 9, 2017
8
5
6
Holy shit!
Now I need to get some 156ers and some RL26. Is it as dirty as RL16, because that had me switch back to H4350 since there was only a marginal speed difference.
I use RL26 in my 6.5 PRC and it is one the dirtiest smokeless powders I've ever used.
 
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Merovingian

Private
Minuteman
Oct 6, 2019
30
15
12
Today i had some time so i cut open Hornady and RCC brass. RCC brass as i stated in previous post holds pressure much better. I did some measurements and it was impressive. At 80.01 no pressure with RCC brass. I also called Jeff at RCC to gather more info on this brass and everything made more sense. After i cut them open, here on picture you can see side by side RCC constructed like a Tank. Especially around primer pocket its very visible, difference is huge and here are pictures.
View attachment 7187041

View attachment 7187030
As you can see RCC constructed much much stronger and better. But not only that RCC brass is made out of stronger material. Primer pockets hold much better because around primer pocket its much more thicker material than Hornady Brass.
I also got in contact with Jeff at RCC and he is just very smart and know his stuff when it comes to making top line bras that's for sure.

This is from RCC because i had questions how its made and why it's so different and so good.
HERE IS SOME VERY INTERESTING INFO ABOUT RCC BRASS FROM JEFF at RCC
The problem a lot of people have is finding quality brass for the caliber they shoot. We manufacture high quality cartridges for vintage, obsolete, hard to find and wildcat calibers. All cartridges are made to SAAMI, CIP or tolerances provided to us. Our unique process allows us to manufacture over 1,400 different cartridges at tolerances up to 0.0005”. We can manufacture brass cartridges for any firearm, and if you are seeking quality products made in the USA, then you are at the right place.

The draw process has been used for cartridge manufacturing since the 19th century and manufacturers have been able to develop this process to produce high volumes of brass cases. Draw cartridge manufactures have tested many different types of materials over the years and the best material for this process is a brass alloy with a mixture of 70% copper and 30% zinc.

When brass is annealed at 250° C there is no visible change to the bonding of the grain structure, tensile strength and elasticity. At 300° C there is a microscopic change to the grain structure and at 350° the work hardness becomes softer and a fine grain structure can be seen. As temperatures increase the brass becomes fully annealed at 750° C and large crystals can be seen. Temperatures above this point will cause damage to the brass and at 800°C the brass is burned and should be scrapped.

When brass is cold-worked it hardens and done by bending, drawing, compressing and so forth. This increases the tensile strength and decreases it’s elasticity. To accommodate todays high pressure cartridges brass must both have a high tensile strength to withstand pressure spikes and elasticity to seal the chamber from any gas blow back.

The draw process begins using a brass cup that is annealed and cleaned to remove any scale build up that might have occurred. During the first draw the cup is pushed through a die with a punch and extruded to lengthen the cup. It has become work hardened and has to be annealed and washed for the second draw. Typically a cartridge will go through 4 draws before it is ready to go to the next stage. The case head will be turned, primer pockets, flash holes, head stamps and necks are done to complete the manufacturing process. When the neck is formed the cartridge is annealed again and is then polished for shipping. During each annealing, the temperature is reduced to work harden the case for higher tensile strength and elasticity. The final annealing is to the body of the case and is at a lower temperature, so it won’t affect the case head hardness.

While the draw process is capable of mass production, it is not able to easily produce consistence case head hardness, case weight, case volume and case concentricity. At RCC Brass™ we have taken those variables out of the manufacturing process as we have our C260 cartridge brass hammer forged into a tight molecular grain structure with a high tensile strength and 15% elasticity. We machine all our cases on CNC lathes and mills and our case weight, case volume and our case concentricity are the best available in the industry. We don’t anneal the case head as it is hammer forged to a high tensile strength which gives us the same hardness for each case. Since we are use CNC equipment to manufacture our, case weight is nearly identical, the case volume is too, and our case concentricity is held to a 0.001”.

Since we are not held back by the limitations of a draw system, we are able to use higher strength alloys to manufacture cartridges. Our new C272 brass alloy has a much higher tensile strength and tighter molecular grain structure than C260 brass, without losing the needed elasticity. Test results have been very positive as we’ve had reports of increased in velocity and energy and lower shot deviations versus C260 drawn brass. But the test is what you can do with RCC Brass™.


We are proudly Made in the U.S.A.

RCC brass is not for anyone but if you want the best i don't regret spending my $$$ on RCC because its nothing short of impressive.
Will be doing some more testing here soon and will keep you posted guys about SD and extreme spread.
Thanks for the cut away, definitely shows the difference in quality. Side Note to anyone in N. CO area. Scheels website says Johnstown has H1K 1 pounders.
 
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LakuNoc

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Jun 13, 2018
173
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That is excellent information conveyed by the cut away brass. That case head is huge. The only questions I have for you is: 1. Do you plan on counter sinking the inside flash hole? 2. Normally I use Federal #210 match primers...but the length of that flash hole...man...can you see if there is much difference between a regular and a magnum primer?

Thanks for the post. I don't think a lot of people truly understand...or maybe appreciate the difference in retail brass and the huge difference in both the materials used and the process that RCC uses to produce this brass.
I will do test on that but for now i use regular CCI BR-2 primers. They are not magnum primer and it works with no problem.
 
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LakuNoc

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Jun 13, 2018
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Thanks for taking the time in that post. Very informative.

Have you, or are you planning on annealing at any point with this brass in your testing?
Yes i do anneal after every firing or after every other. Yes i will anneal RCC brass, will keep you posted.