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Anyone Read A Good NON-Fiction Book Lately?

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  • Anyone Read A Good NON-Fiction Book Lately?

    This thread is for the (titled) topic of any good NON-Fiction books. Due to the eclectic tastes and interests here on The 'Hide, there is a huge potential for knowledge expansion for so many others. Share it, here!

    The Rice Paddy Navy by Linda Kush - U.S. Sailors Undercover In China, Espionage and sabotage behind japanese lines in China during World War II.
    One Hundred Victories b y Linda Robinson - Special Ops and the future of American Warfare.

    Currently Reading:
    13 Hours by Mitchell Zuckoff - The inside account of what really happened in Benghazi

    On Deck:
    Murder At Camp Delta by Joseph Hickman - A Staff Sergeant's pursuit of the truth about Guantanamo Bay

    Whaddayagot't'add?
    God Bless, Stay Safe, and Remember! Go big, or go home.
    My own "Good Guy List": http://forum.snipershide.com/firearm...ml#post1761755

  • #2
    I'm in the middle of Ardennes 1944 by Anthony Beevor.

    It's a very readable account of the Battle of the Bulge.
    I can shoot moa sized groups all day, every day, with pretty much any rifle.
    It's just a pity that I don't live in New Zealand, and that they're extinct.........

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    • #3
      "The Worst Hard Time" by Timothy Egan. It is an account of those that survived the great dust bowl. Its good.

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      • #4
        In the middle of reading "Blood Red Snow". It's by a MG42 gunner who wrote notes/journals about his time fighting the Russians around Stalingrad. First time I've read a WW2 book from the German perspective... kinda surprised I actually found sad for them but in the end they just want to survive.

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        • #5
          "Hard Choices" by Hilary Clinton. Kind of preachy and repetitive, and I keep hearing this horrible whiny voice in my head as I'm reading it, but FUNNY AS HELL! I wouldn't have bought it, but I found a couple of boxes of brand new copies in the Dumpster behind the local Barnes & Noble.

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          • #6
            History of the Second World War, B.H. Liddell Hart. Superb treatise by a Brit about Allied and Axis actions during WWII. Does a thorough job of roasting politicians (including Churchill) and generals convinced that WWI tactics were applicable to WWII. Liddell Hart advocated mechanized warfare in the 1920s; unfortunately, the only person who paid attention was Guderian. I would rate this as a "must read" for anyone even remotely interested in WWII.

            Combat Actions in Korea, Capt Russell Gugeler. Small unit actions written by a combat veteran (WWII Pacific). Also includes a chapter by Martin Blumenson, another combat vet, who is noted for writing The Patton Papers, among numerous other books.

            Okinawa: The Last Battle, Roy Appleman, James M. Burns, Russell Gugeler, Stevens. Written from personal observation at the front. (For instance, Gugeler picked up the Bronze Star and Purple Heart.) Also includes section written by Edmund G. Love, later known for Subways Are for Sleeping. I think Stevens was the colonel overseeing the book; unlike the others, I don't believe he wrote anything (at least post-war).

            The Halder War Diary 1939-1942, Gen. Franz Halder (Chief of the German General Staff, 1938-1942). Fascinating chronicle kept by the man who planned the invasions of Poland and France. Fired by Hitler for disagreeing about Hitler's bad decisions during the Russian campaign. Gen. Halder and his wife later were imprisoned in Dachau until freed by American troops.

            Cheers,
            Richard
            [Discussing the concerns some governments had of arming citizens.] "If they had considered this, they would have been convinced that tyranny and usurpation are not a result of arming the citizens, but of leading a government weakly, and that while a state is well led, it has nothing to fear from its subjects' arms."

            -- Niccolo Machiavelli, "The Art of War"

            NRA Life
            Varmint Hunters Assoc.
            USPSA

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            • #7
              Blood in the Hills. The story of Khe Sanh, The Most Savage Fight of the Vietnam War.

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              • #8
                So as I stated earlier, I just finished reading 13 Hours. Has anyone else read it? If that book don't rip you apart, then you ain't human. It isn't a 'finger-pointing diatribe', it is a very detailed tome of the happenings, from each person's perspective. In the best way possible, considering.

                They make it a point to give the information and details as clearly and accurately as possible. For YOU, the reader, to formulate your own opinions. For me, it was the "timing duration" that got me. It was so 'minimal and downplayed'..... and yet one of the most poignant points of the whole debacle.

                I'd almost go as far as to say "there are certain people whom we should be hanging from our own bridges....." but it wouldn't be civilized of me to say such, would it? Especially on Easter Sunday.

                So I won't......
                God Bless, Stay Safe, and Remember! Go big, or go home.
                My own "Good Guy List": http://forum.snipershide.com/firearm...ml#post1761755

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                • #9
                  81 days below zero

                  Actual account of a test pilot who survived 81 days in the Alaskan bush after a plane crash.

                  Great story and easy quick read.


                  Sent from NSA wire tapped device.

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                  • #10
                    7stw, good call. I'll look for it.
                    God Bless, Stay Safe, and Remember! Go big, or go home.
                    My own "Good Guy List": http://forum.snipershide.com/firearm...ml#post1761755

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      The Warrior's Reading list:

                      The following books fit the criteria of being "really good." There are other books that are historically accurate, but that do not read like a novel. These are books I couldn't put down until I'd finished them.

                      WWII - Front Soldaten, Forgotten Soldier, Blond Knight of Germany, and Stuka Pilot. Biggest takeaway from these books is physical toughness. In Stuka Pilot, Rudel basically runs a naked barefoot marathon in Russia in winter. Blond knight of Germany: Erich Hartmann shoots down 350 ish aircraft, surrenders to the Americans, and is handed over to the Russians where he spends the next 11 years in a Russian gulag. Increidbly, his wife, Ursula, waits for him the whole time. How many of us have come back from a 60 day trip (contractors) in the sandbox to find a significant other who has moved on? the other two are chronicles of the Wehrmacht's version of the 0311 or 11B. All books recommended to me by USMA history professors and combat veterans. Don't forget "Strong Men Armed," by Robert Leckie - a must read about an 0311 in WWII.

                      Korea - Cloder than Hell - about the Chosin Reservoir.

                      Vietnam - Five Years to Freedom - Nick Rowe.

                      Indian Wars - Bury my Heart at Wounded Knee, Empire of the Summer Moon, A Sorrow in our Hearts - story of Tecumseh. Each of these is great. Talks again about physical toughness - old timer Indians were masters at going without food or water in order to cover what would still be record distances on horseback or even on foot. Think Nebraska to Mexico and back every year. Also, don't miss "Crow Killer, the saga of Liver eating Johnson." This is the historical story of the REAL Jeremiah Johnson, not the sensitive vegan played by Robert Redford. Short, you could read it in a night.

                      If I've posted something that most here have already read, please forgive my ignorance. Otherwise enjoy.

                      God bless Ameirca

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                      • #12
                        Best non-fiction book of all time: The Bible. Start at Genesis 1:1.

                        Don't know how I forgot that one.

                        God bless America

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                        • #13
                          Half way through "Gallipoli Sniper." Chronicles the life and expolits of Billy Sing circa WW1. Known as the "Anzac Angel of Death" and "Assassin of Gallipoli. Considered to be the most successful sniper and most feared man in Gallipoli.
                          Last edited by molonlave; 04-23-2017, 06:17 PM.

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                          • #14
                            Indian Wars - Bury my Heart at Wounded Knee, Empire of the Summer Moon, A Sorrow in our Hearts - story of Tecumseh. Each of these is great. Talks again about physical toughness - old timer Indians were masters at going without food or water in order to cover what would still be record distances on horseback or even on foot. Think Nebraska to Mexico and back every year. Also, don't miss "Crow Killer, the saga of Liver eating Johnson." This is the historical story of the REAL Jeremiah Johnson, not the sensitive vegan played by Robert Redford. Short, you could read it in a night.


                            Johnson is an interesting character. I read "Crow Killer" a number of years ago and wish I still had my copy. The internet has made research so much easier. Back in the day around '72 when the film came out, I had a friend whose family had lived in Red Lodge, Montana forever. His uncle had lived in one of Johnson's cabins when Johnson was sheriff (constable?) of Red Lodge. It can be almost impossible to separate legend from fact

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