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  • The Woodchuck and Firewood Hoarders Thread

    It seems as though at least a few of us share a second addiction of chainsaws, log splitters (thanks to you wonderfully generous deplorables), firewood hoarding and stacking, and in general just making trees our bitches.

    tnichols and I are both on at least one other forum specific to this field, but like us with precision rifles, the guys over there are maniacs for this shit. You can't ask a simple chainsaw question without the general consensus instantly being that you have to have a custom-built pro saw ( and many of them) for every application. I figured there might be some fun in those of us who don't make a daily living at it (with the possible exception of oneshot86 earning his Natty Light money) just sharing some knowledge and pictures of our setups.

    I'm also WAY overdue in following up on Splitzilla's status, so this is as good a place as any.

    I know we've got pics related to this spread all over "what's my view" and a few other threads, but feel free to duplicate / consolidate them here as you see fit.

    So come on 1J04 , MtnCreek MontanaMarine , vh20 , sirhrmechanic, Tucker301 , and all the folks I've seen post up homestead pics, but apologetically can't remember all the user names. Show Off Your Wood!!!!
    Last edited by bogeybrown; 12-27-2017, 10:52 PM.
    I am The German's spirit animal

  • #76
    Originally posted by dallas34 View Post
    I have always lurked but never posted. Until this thread.
    Wow, that has to be a record. Joined 2009 and this is your first post ? Again, wow. Welcome and that appears to be some beautiful and valuable lumber, congrats !

    Comment


    • #77
      Now that is a pile of lumber......what are your plans for it?

      Comment


      • #78
        No plans yet. but having a couple of 6" x 24" x 12' heartwood white oak hanging around will be nice. If it falls it saws. It will take 6 years to air dry though. Next up is a solar kiln.

        Comment


        • #79
          Surprised no one has mentioned Jonsered for a great saw? I think they actually own Husky now. Canít go wrong with a Stihl either. I have one my grandfather used 20 years ago as a logger. That saw still runs great.


          Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
          LORD, MAKE ME FAST AND ACCURATE
          LET MY AIM BE TRUE AND MY HANDS FASTER
          THAN THOSE WHO WOULD SEEK TO DESTROY ME
          GRANT ME VICTORY OVER MY FOES
          AND THOSE THAT WISH TO DO HARM TO ME AND MINE
          LET NOT MY LAST THOUGHT BE
          IF I ONLY HAD MY GUN
          AND LORD IF TODAY IS TRULY
          THE DAY THAT YOU CALL ME HOME
          LET ME DIE
          IN A PILE OF EMPTY BRASS
          AMEN

          Comment


          • #80
            Originally posted by 4ester View Post
            Surprised no one has mentioned Jonsered for a great saw? I think they actually own Husky now. Canít go wrong with a Stihl either. I have one my grandfather used 20 years ago as a logger. That saw still runs great.


            Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
            Not a thing wrong with the old Jonnyís. Really solid saws in their day. We had a couple when I was a kid. Tough to find parts or support for these days.
            Universal means it don't fit nothin'.

            Sometimes free ain't cheap enough.

            Comment


            • #81
              Trouble with a lot of old saws is parts. Just like guns, there are those of us who treasure and preserve, and those who beat with a hammer.

              I retired my 14,000 RPM Homelite EZ from 1964 3 years ago because the muffler screws won't stay tight. Cuts like a beast, louder that 2 train wrecks.

              And that's when the muffler is tight.

              Comment


              • #82
                I've used Stihls, Dolmars, Jonsereds and Huskies. They're all good saws. If you get the forestry grade ones - it really is worth the extra money.

                Now I'm old and fat (I carried a doe a mile last month, and had to stop for four rest breaks. I could do it in one hit, once...), I use a Husky. The power
                to weight ratio does it for me, and you can rebuild a Husky on the tailgate of the pickup with a few hand tools - not so with a Stihl.

                Use a bar as short as possible - saves robbing power, and less to sharpen.

                Remember, it's a saw, not a dick extension.
                Everybody wants the big time. No one wants to work for it.
                Captain Phil Harris
                F.V. Cornelia Marie
                December 19 1956-February 9 2010

                Comment


                • #83
                  Best Quote ever! LMAO

                  Remember, it's a saw, not a dick extension.
                  I love my country, not my government

                  Comment


                  • #84
                    Dallas34, would love to have a nice 32-36' wide plank of that about 6 feet long to make a table out of.

                    I may have to go home to IA to find a big oak or walnut to cut to make a kitchen table out of someday. Maybe a round? My dad had a big red oak cut out of his front yard that was 60" across at the base before they ground the stump...... That 4' thick would have made a helluva table.

                    Nice pictures and stories fellas, nice to read.

                    Comment


                    • #85
                      Originally posted by tnichols

                      Not a thing wrong with the old Jonnyís. Really solid saws in their day. We had a couple when I was a kid. Tough to find parts or support for these days.
                      Jonsered is still alive and well as far as I know, still offering new saws. I hear you on the parts though. I had an old 70E that broke the tensioner, and couldnít find a new one anywhere.


                      Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
                      LORD, MAKE ME FAST AND ACCURATE
                      LET MY AIM BE TRUE AND MY HANDS FASTER
                      THAN THOSE WHO WOULD SEEK TO DESTROY ME
                      GRANT ME VICTORY OVER MY FOES
                      AND THOSE THAT WISH TO DO HARM TO ME AND MINE
                      LET NOT MY LAST THOUGHT BE
                      IF I ONLY HAD MY GUN
                      AND LORD IF TODAY IS TRULY
                      THE DAY THAT YOU CALL ME HOME
                      LET ME DIE
                      IN A PILE OF EMPTY BRASS
                      AMEN

                      Comment


                      • #86
                        Originally posted by dallas34 View Post
                        I have always lurked but never posted. Until this thread. Too much fun wrapped up in this. The hurricane dropped or wrecked a few trees this year so I had to get to work. Too bad it took out the top of the biggest tree on the property. The Stihl 660 with the 36" bar made felling the big white oak a lot safer.
                        Dallas, You have some nice looking gear. What make is your band mill? I've never seen a vertical one only horizontal like wood mizer.

                        Comment


                        • #87
                          Originally posted by dallas34 View Post
                          No plans yet. but having a couple of 6" x 24" x 12' heartwood white oak hanging around will be nice. If it falls it saws. It will take 6 years to air dry though. Next up is a solar kiln.
                          My son has a wood mizer mill. I have a question about the lumber pictures. What is the purpose of painting the ends of your lumber?

                          Comment


                          • #88
                            Originally posted by mtrmn View Post

                            What is the purpose of painting the ends of your lumber?
                            1) If you cut a live tree it will have a lot of water in it
                            2) As wood dries it will shrink
                            3) The end grain is open to the air and will dry faster than the center of the board
                            4) This means that the center of the board becomes wider than the ends and this stresses the ends and they begin to split- this is called checking
                            5) Paint can plug the pores at the end of the board so that the board will dry more evenly and there will be less checking.
                            6) For me the paint also serves a secondary purpose, I use one color for maple, another color for ash, another color for elm, and another color for cherry. After the boards have been in the barn a few years it is not always easy to remember what is what, and rough sawed lumber is not that visually distinctive.

                            Comment


                            • #89
                              Loaded for a chilly evening,

                              20048A78-92CD-4197-865B-366BEA4BC412.jpeg
                              Universal means it don't fit nothin'.

                              Sometimes free ain't cheap enough.

                              Comment


                              • #90
                                Originally posted by tnichols View Post
                                Loaded for a chilly evening,

                                20048A78-92CD-4197-865B-366BEA4BC412.jpeg
                                We load for a chilly night a little different by putting in one large round of oak on a good bed of coals which my wife calls a "chunky monkey" lol. It burns all night.

                                Comment


                                • #91
                                  Originally posted by timesublime View Post
                                  I currently have a MS 391 and I have realized that it's time for a bigger saw, something in the 30-36" bar size. What do you suggest? Local Bobcat dealer stocks Stihl Pro saws.
                                  If its main job is going to be pulling a bar that size, you're into the 80-90cc range. For a new Stihl your starting point is probably going to be the 660 series. Also start looking at skip or semi-skip chains depending on what you're cutting at that size.

                                  As for the Johnsereds , I hear that there's a lot of parts compatibility with Husky. What's dangerous for me is that I have a pro dealer that stocks both Husky and Stihl next door to a Tractor Supply that's sells Johnsereds, just a couple miles from the house. I'll be in the neighborhood and just stop in and play with saws. It's like that urge to stop in a good LGS just for fun and always finding new shit you've got to have.

                                  dallas34 , that's a wicked setup. I'd love to have the availability of a mill. I took down a maple for my neighbor that had some great curling and I was cringing as I split it into firewood. I've considered devoting one of my saws to an Alaskan Mill at some point down the road just for those occasions.
                                  I am The German's spirit animal

                                  Comment


                                  • #92
                                    Originally posted by diverdon View Post

                                    1) If you cut a live tree it will have a lot of water in it
                                    2) As wood dries it will shrink
                                    3) The end grain is open to the air and will dry faster than the center of the board
                                    4) This means that the center of the board becomes wider than the ends and this stresses the ends and they begin to split- this is called checking
                                    5) Paint can plug the pores at the end of the board so that the board will dry more evenly and there will be less checking.
                                    6) For me the paint also serves a secondary purpose, I use one color for maple, another color for ash, another color for elm, and another color for cherry. After the boards have been in the barn a few years it is not always easy to remember what is what, and rough sawed lumber is not that visually distinctive.
                                    Thanks for this detailed explanation. My son may know this already but I was unaware of it. I'll pass it on to him since I know he does not do this now.

                                    Comment


                                    • #93
                                      I haven't posted in a while,. That 2 ears and 2 eyes and only 1 mouth thing. Anyway. towards the end of the summer getting close to hunting season I decided to clear off some of my back field. I needed some more pasture space. I was running my old saw pretty hard and it finally quit. The guy that usually does the work on my stuff has a sick child and had been sitting at childrens hospital with him for a week. The farm stores that carry the better stuff were all closed so I ran over to Lowes and grabbed a Husky to get me by until my friend could work on my saw. What a POS it is. I spend more time adjusting the chain and keeping that POS running than sawing. I tried 2 different brands of chains and 2 different bars.
                                      Maybe it's just me. But I have to adjust the damn chain every 10 minutes or so. It will be completely stretched before I have sharpened it a couple times. Any ideas. I used an Oregon chain and a Husky chain possibly another brand but can't recall right now.

                                      Comment


                                      • #94
                                        Bogeybrown, you might want to ask around who has a portable band mill then go introduce yourself. It is not at all uncommon for those guys to be willing to show up with their saw and help you do a day of milling for a very reasonable price. Sometimes you can even work out a barter where you help him with some sawing and he will do some sawing for you when you need it.

                                        Bring a dust mask. Most sawmill operators don't bother but it can't be good to choke on sawdust all day.

                                        Comment


                                        • #95
                                          I don't even know what hard drive I'd have to look through to find pictures of the wood piles we had when living in MI. We moved to CO in '04 and I've been in woodburning withdrawal ever since. We had two places at our MI homestead for wood storage - a 22 x 14 x 10' tall pole barn and a 16 x 16 x 11' room attached to the house. We'd use the pole barn to store fresh cut, un-split wood until we had time to split it and move it to the 16x16' room. We had a nice splitting area in the 16x 16 with hard rubber over wood over concrete around a knee-high oak plug. Once it got real cold, we'd split kindling indoors. Our property had a mix of poplar, evergreen and hardwood but I killed most of the poplar off and burned it. One year we got 40 full (not face) cords of red oak when a freak storm blew in from the NE and uprooted trees all over mid-Michigan. We just drove around and asked folks if they wanted us to remove their downed trees. I burned 2 weeks of vacation cutting wood and loved every minute of it. Many of those red oak stumps were 2' in diameter, easy to split by hand so I just split them on site. Good times.

                                          Comment


                                          • #96
                                            Man I love cutting wood. Over the years I've slowly designed and built equipment to make it easier on myself and family.

                                            Here's a couple of grapples. One for a John Deere and one w quick attach for the skid steer.

                                            Saw mill that I helped design and build with a couple of buddies.

                                            And then the piles of wood from recent years. Have always burnt wood and grew up in a house that burnt wood.












                                            Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

                                            Comment


                                            • #97
                                              Originally posted by tnichols
                                              Never leave an ugly stump...

                                              F3EBACF5-18E2-44CC-B280-C26469EC4471.jpeg
                                              I've cut a few off over the years and hid the evidence...


                                              Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

                                              Comment


                                              • #98
                                                And I was too cheap to buy an outdoor woodburner so I built one. Going on 9 years now.


                                                Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

                                                Comment


                                                • #99
                                                  great photos you guys

                                                  Comment


                                                  • Originally posted by powdahound76 View Post
                                                    Dallas34, would love to have a nice 32-36' wide plank of that about 6 feet long to make a table out of.

                                                    I may have to go home to IA to find a big oak or walnut to cut to make a kitchen table out of someday. Maybe a round? My dad had a big red oak cut out of his front yard that was 60" across at the base before they ground the stump...... That 4' thick would have made a helluva table.

                                                    Nice pictures and stories fellas, nice to read.
                                                    PM sent. Nothing 32" wide because I was limited by the mill. Had to square it up at 24"

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