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ARC "switch lug" thread locking device

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  • ARC "switch lug" thread locking device

    does anyone even understand what this guy is even talking about?
    what does this mean for mausingfield owners?
    anyone else just wait for him to release something and buy it assuming he knows what he's talking about or is it just me.

    https://m.facebook.com/story.php?sto...14173692058627

  • #2
    All it means is that drilling into his receiver for a switchlug voids the warranty. It may not make it a bomb but theres no guarantees that it wont either and thus he doesnt want any liability from people hacking apart his designs to work for some other manufacturer.

    So for the prduct its basically that you have two nuts instead of one but they work off of one another in loading the threads. You can get a savage barrel nut install (compared to a cut shouldered barrel) but without having to get out your barrel vice and action wrenches and it should take less time than the conventional nut set up.

    The barrel but goes into/under the collar, with the angled surface it will spread the collar. But when you tighten the spread collar down it will pinch and try to push the barrel nut back out in effect adding a bunch of torque to the barrel threads into the receiver. Now its still untested, yeah. But the theory sounds good to me. I dont imagine there being enough slop in the threads to allow it to change enough to really alter head space which is the one concern I can think of.

    https://forum.snipershide.com/forum/...99#post6626899

    "All,

    Chad from LRI made me aware of this post. After reading it, I can understand the desire for a barrel that is easily removed and replaced. I also think that I need to answer some questions about the use of the Switch Lug with a Mausingfield action. It is true that modifying a Mausingfield action in any way essentially voids the warranty. This policy exists for at least the two following reasons. First, it encourages the customer to contact me before doing anything to the action. The Mausingfield has been revised more than once because of good customer feedback. Secondly, the receiver of a Mausingfield is rather hard and difficult to machine. This is especially true for those who are not manufacturing experts.

    That said, I do not recommend modifying a Mausingfield for use with the Switch Lug. Drilling holes parallel to the length of a Mausingfield receiver would require that the entire action assembly be tested for safety, and I have little or no confidence that it would pass if such modifications were made to the receiver. Holes drilled into the face of the receiver will undoubtedly result in stress concentrations that could potentially lead to fractures. I realize that many receivers have been drilled in order to pin recoil lugs but Mausingfield receivers were not among them. I would not recommend doing this to any receiver unless appropriate tests have first been conducted.

    Now, in the spirit of competition and innovation, I can offer what I think is a properly designed barrel thread locking devise. Have a look at the pictures below.

    The devise consists of a split collar and a nut. Encircling the bore (hole) of the split collar is a shallow conical seat against which a conical, spherical, toroidal, or otherwise axi-symmetrical form of the nut will come to bear. The screw of the split collar can then be tightened and thus effectively pre-load the barrel thread thereby immobilizing the receiver and the barrel with respect to one another. The advantage of such an arrangement over the Switch Lug is that it does not require one to drill holes into the face of a receiver. Additionally, it significantly pre-loads the barrel thread because as the split collar's screw is tightened, the collapsing action of the split collar's cone forces the barrel and the receiver in opposing directions with tremendous mechanical advantage. Threads are meant to be pre-loaded for multiple reasons, the least of which, in this particular application, is not the preservation of the positional relationship between barrel and receiver/scope.

    Assembly is easy. Simply screw the nut onto the barrel thread as far as possible ensuring that the conical (or more generally, axi-symmetrical) seat of the nut is facing the receiver. Slip the split collar over the barrel thread so that the cone (countersink) is facing the nut. Screw the barrel into the receiver until it comes to stop against a go+ gage. Ensuring the the screw of the split collar is loose, turn the nut back towards the receiver so as to firmly sandwich the split collar between the receiver and the nut. Doing so should cause the split collar to open by a small amount. Finally, tighten the screw of the split collar to pre-load the barrel-receiver joint thus completing the assembly process.

    I will have the first parts in hand within the next few days at which point I will post a video of the assembly and dis-assembly process. After that, we'll head to the range and see if we can shoot some tiny little groups. All parts have been designed to work with Savage pre-fit barrels having a 1.063-20 UN 2A thread approximately 1.500" in length (standard savage small shank.) I have also designed variants for barrels having shoulders.

    Ted"



    Last edited by spife7980; 09-13-2017, 09:11 AM.

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    • #3
      The only real down fall I see is the need for extra stock inletting and you'll need go/no go gauges.
      Once the collar is loc-tite to the barrel you shouldn't need a gauge anymore.
      I'd assume this would work for the TL3's too.
      LE Firearms Instructor
      Armorer
      NRA Life Member

      Comment


      • #4
        Originally posted by Wyfox View Post
        The only real down fall I see is the need for extra stock inletting and you'll need go/no go gauges.
        Once the collar is loc-tite to the barrel you shouldn't need a gauge anymore.
        I'd assume this would work for the TL3's too.
        Why would you need to loctite the collar? Seems like tightening it should suffice to keep it secure through the life of the barrel

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        • #5
          It would act as a shouldered barrel

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          • #6
            Originally posted by Cody S View Post

            Why would you need to loctite the collar? Seems like tightening it should suffice to keep it secure through the life of the barrel
            To lock the front collar in place so that you just spin the barrel onto the rear lock collar and tighten the screw and don't have to worry about headspace every time you install the barrel.

            Comment


            • #7
              This idea is interesting. Could the same effect be accomplished by simply cutting the bevel into the shoulder of the barrel?
              dallasrifle.com

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              • #8
                Yes. It may prove a little more challenging setting consistent headspace initially because it's not a hard shoulder.

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