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  • ELR what percentage is mental?

    There was a comment on a another thread I interpreted as ELR being a mostly mental game.

    Never really thought about it before ( yes I get the irony)

    Thought it might make a good Poll
    18
    100% Mental game
    0%
    0
    60% Mental 40% other
    55.56%
    10
    20% Mental 80% other
    44.44%
    8
    Last edited by Hoffer; 08-02-2017, 12:36 PM.

  • #2
    I would say 20% mental 80% preparation

    Comment


    • #3
      Any weakness in your fundamentals will be exposed ten fold in ELR so there's that. Assuming a decent firearm the rest of it is really good ammo and the ability to make really good wind calls. If you want to include the ability of understanding and making good wind calls in the "preparation" catagory, then of the catagories you list, I'd have to go with box #3 as the ability to call the wind is the lions share of it.

      Comment


      • #4
        I've shot a lot at 1,000 and 1,250 but never beyond until recently. Went to shoot out to 2,000 recently. I agree with the 80% preparation part. We started at 1,000 and as I expected (because we shoot F class often) was on the target in the 1st shot. Went to 1,500 and was a nightmare because where the target sat in relation to the wind. We never did hit it after many, many rounds. I was starting to worry we were not going going to get it done. We decided to move onto the 1 mile target. I had detailed notes prepared in advance. I made some corrections based on my velocity and temperature change. My youngest son and I were on the 1 mile target in the 1st shot, my other son in 2. Moved onto the 2,000 and youngest hit the 2,000 yard target on the 3rd shot. Not saying we are experts by any means but thought we did pretty good 1st time out at that distance. I never could have done it without my notes that I keep. The mental part was getting to me a bit at the 1,500 yard target, however. But the data I collected prior to this helped significantly.

        Comment


        • #5
          Mental? Or Intellectual? I don't think ELR is any more "mental" than shooting for groups at 100. It is definitely a LOT more intellectual, however.

          Comment


          • #6
            Originally posted by vh20 View Post
            Mental? Or Intellectual? I don't think ELR is any more "mental" than shooting for groups at 100. It is definitely a LOT more intellectual, however.
            There's way more 'space' for errors . . .

            Comment


            • #7
              As the OP hinted at, you have to be mental to engage in the sport of ELR shooting...

              I do think however, that ELR is like almost any other sport in that to succeed beyond just having fun, your head has to be in it.

              Comment


              • #8
                If you have verified and confirmed your equipment to know the mechanical part as well as the ballistics i.e.: bullet, and computer all work and are proven the rest is the game we play. Communication between spotter, shooter, as well as the shooters ability to understand conditions and make a correct decision between shots is the biggest battle on the line. An event is not the time to be testing gear, that needs to be done before hand. Failures on the line will ultimately put you out of the game before you realize it. Mechanical reliability needs to be 100% and you need to have a confidence level in it that you don't think about it on the line. You don't have time or capacity to worry about the mechanicals, the line is where you focus on shooting and working with your spotter to utilize the data you are working with.
                "The Catholics have churches, fat people have Wisconsin, and I have the Pawtucket Brewery." Peter Griffin

                Comment


                • #9
                  I don't know what 'mental' means exactly.

                  I see ELR as a combination of art and science. That is what makes it interesting to me.

                  The science, well, that in essentially the gear, and physics.

                  The art, that's the individual understanding of the science, paired with the skills that comprise building a shooting position, reading the wind, and the knowledge that drives building the rifle and ammunition that will deliver out there.

                  How much is one, how much the other? Hell, I don't know. 50/50?

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    When someone puts their child behind a LR rig, and they hit a LR target, deer, whatever, it doesn't mean much to me at all. The child doesn't comprehend what went into the shot.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      I'll try to throw a few ideas into the mix as to shooting well

                      Somewhere in here the mental game plays its part.

                      Equipment and the understanding of it is the primary element in the process
                      You can only squeeze so much out of a bullet everything has it's limits but yet can be pushed, a 6.5 has its dead end that can't compare to a 338LM and then to a 375, 416 and 50. So be realistic about your goals as far as extended ranges.

                      Quality in the smith work - chamber, barrels stock can all make or break a good shooter.
                      Understanding and being able to utilize ballistics programs - good info inputs = good corrections and results.

                      Most important - combining ballistic corrections to actual drops and knowing how to correctly adjust the programs to give the shooter valid information that contributes to its maximum useable distance that leads to success.

                      All of the above if addressed correctly and not taken for granted will build confidence in the system --- This is the most important part in the productive mental game - confidence!

                      The skills developed
                      quality reloading skills contributes to consistency in accuracy and tighter vertical spreads down range
                      Wind reading and corrections - time behind a spotting scope or rifle scope studying the effects of mirage and learning how much mirage can help in wind calls and corrections.
                      Trigger time - the more time spent behind the trigger the better you can learn your system. Some folks cannot handle recoil-so down size your system - flinching is a result of fear which results in bad habits and walking away from the sport.

                      Again mental
                      Get in the scope and shoot in a offense mode - you are aiming with the intent to hit your target to many folks get into position and over aim trying not to miss the target - thus a defensive mode, this normally causes a shooter to start to break down and struggle.

                      Pay attention to all the little things from reloading, rifle setup, good proven ballistics data and attitude we all have bad days once in a while but don't loose your head - it's not over untill the last round is sent. All the little things add up when shooting under pressure be it a fun shoot, heavy competition or a buck of a lifetime in your crosshairs.

                      I hope some of this helps

                      Cheers
                      oneshot
                      oneshot.onehit

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Originally posted by oneshot.onehit View Post

                        I hope some of this helps

                        Cheers
                        oneshot
                        Wise words !

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Originally posted by MontanaMarine View Post
                          When someone puts their child behind a LR rig, and they hit a LR target, deer, whatever, it doesn't mean much to me at all. The child doesn't comprehend what went into the shot.
                          Depends on the situation. My "kid" is 18 years old and been competitive F class shooter for 5 years that now shoots at the Master level. Makes his wind calls based on mirage, will sit and wait 2-3 min sometimes through a boil before he takes a shot which often comes up an X. In his case, I'm often extremely impressed!

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Originally posted by Tempest 455 View Post

                            Depends on the situation. My "kid" is 18 years old and been competitive F class shooter for 5 years that now shoots at the Master level. Makes his wind calls based on mirage, will sit and wait 2-3 min sometimes through a boil before he takes a shot which often comes up an X. In his case, I'm often extremely impressed!
                            Nice !

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              All about wind for me . I'm happy with my SD's and shooting , it's that unseen opposite wind
                              downrange that bites me on the ass at ELR distances . Mirage is my friend too , consistenly
                              get better results with some mirage to dope the wind . It's winter here in Aus , one of my ELR
                              spots had zero mirage but 12 mph winds the other day . Just had to wag it based on wind at
                              firing point and watching the wind cycles in the tree tops mid distance .

                              Comment


                              • #16
                                Solid equipment, ammo prep and solid proven dope, aside (huge components), knowing the exact distance is huge.

                                There are two class of ELR shooter that have developed. F-class rigs managing most the recoil on know distance & dope proven targets/events that make it all much easier, and field guns were a target or plate is dropped with distances change every-time you go out. The later is much more complicated.

                                Once the dope is on, the "skill" of pulling the trigger isn't more than any other shot.



                                DIY ELR Target Cam with DVR - well proven 2400m+ 2 camera, multiple monitors - link below

                                https://forum.snipershide.com/forum/...vr#post6291944
                                ELR DIY Target Cam tested well past 2000m

                                Comment


                                • #17
                                  I would say it just depends on the shooter.

                                  ive noticed anytime I push out further than I have before I start getting in my head a lot more.

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                                  • #18
                                    Good grief, I think people make way too much on this "mental" thing when it comes to ELR. Sure, you have to have your equipment & ammo dialed in but there's nothing "mental" about that. That's just good preparation. The only difference between short range and ELR are enviormentals, ie, WIND, mirage, temp, humidity, ect, and oh yeah, WIND. Yes, you need good fundamentals but again, nothing "mental" there, just training & practice. When you lay down to take a 200 yd shot do you go "mental"? At 400yds? At 800 yds? At 1200yds? What do you do different at 1500yds than what you do at 200? WHEN do you go "mental" lol. I put the same effort into a 200 yd shot with my 308 as I do at at 2000 with my 338. The only difference is the wind call and related hold. I address the rifle the same. I set up for the shot the same. I pull the trigger the same. I follow through the same. Calling the wind for a really long shot is a combination of experience, good observation skills and a good deal of luck. Sometimes I think people mix up the concept of "concentration" and "mental". I think what's "mental" is spending the money we do on this "sickness for distance" addiction!

                                    Comment


                                    • #19
                                      Originally posted by Fursniper View Post
                                      Good grief, I think people make way too much on this "mental" thing when it comes to ELR. ...

                                      Sometimes I think people mix up the concept of "concentration" and "mental". I think what's "mental" is spending the money we do on this "sickness for distance" addiction!
                                      Yes. Hello?!? That's what I said back in post #7. Well, sorta anyway.

                                      Comment


                                      • #20
                                        Originally posted by lash View Post

                                        Yes. Hello?!? That's what I said back in post #7. Well, sorta anyway.
                                        Lol! You got it right the 1st time Lash. I just felt like a rant!

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