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  • Humbled @ 1930 yard

    We have enjoyed 20-30mph wind for almost 2 weeks. I did shoot a bit in it out to 1100 and did well. Today the winds were much more moderate 5-10mph, but squirrelly from all directions.

    So, I took my AXMC in 300N out (230 OTM @ 2905) and setup my full size IPSC silhouette @ 1930 and sent one. Hmm, impact a bit to the right, elevation looked good. Wind picks up a bit, sent another...left splash in the dirt. Ok, come on bud, really concentrating on all my basics, prone rear bag shooting position. Sent another in what appeared to be similar wind...didn't see dirt splash, so am hopeful. Tripped a couple more. Anyhow, 1 for 8...I could really see the difference between almost 2k and 1k.

    Wind and fundamentals, both of which I need work.

    Second picture 4 /6 when I moved up 1188. I needed a little hope!

    Attached Files

  • #2
    Been there, Bro. For me a 5 o'clock wind gives me fits. Regular hits at 1000-1300 turn in to 20% hits at 2000. I have a hard time believing all the posts I read about folks getting regular predictable hits past a mile, but hey, it could be me.

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    • #3
      FWIW... My velocity is exactly the same with the 230s in the 300NM, but I am at sea level. I point those guys with the Whidden Dies and it helps a bit... A mil or so elevation at 2000.

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      • #4
        Originally posted by jfields View Post
        Regular hits at 1000-1300 turn in to 20% hits at 2000.
        I don't think that's so abnormal. Depending on the gun & cartridge, the 1K range can be very consistent. But with irregular or hard to read wind, 2K is my nightmare.



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        • #5
          I'm just a newbie when it comes to ELR distances and have only been past 1200 four times here in Florida, at 39 ft ASL elevation.. Saturday, I got to take my .338 LM 255.5 Flatline loads out to 1840 yards. A huge difference, mostly due to my inability to read wind and mirage shift at that range. At 1200, This load will hammer a 12" target repeatedly, but I admit that I had to walk the shots onto the target at 1840.

          One issue we were having is that our target is at the end of a long tree cut. That means that up to about 1600, with the great BC of these projectiles, we are effectively in a mostly wind free tunnel. However, past that, the bullets' path rises above the treeline and prevailing winds affect it. I do not yet know how to get a read on wind above a tree tunnel over 40" above the ground.

          Once I found my impact and held for about 6' of left to right wind, I was able to put three in a row in a slightly less than MOA "group". That's if you consider a roughly 16-17" 3-shot pattern a group. 15.5 mils elevation at 2745 fps.

          I obviously have a lot to learn yet, but it was still a satisfying day when all is considered.

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          • #6
            Originally posted by lash View Post
            I'm just a newbie when it comes to ELR distances and have only been past 1200 four times here in Florida, at 39 ft ASL elevation.. Saturday, I got to take my .338 LM 255.5 Flatline loads out to 1840 yards. A huge difference, mostly due to my inability to read wind and mirage shift at that range. At 1200, This load will hammer a 12" target repeatedly, but I admit that I had to walk the shots onto the target at 1840.

            One issue we were having is that our target is at the end of a long tree cut. That means that up to about 1600, with the great BC of these projectiles, we are effectively in a mostly wind free tunnel. However, past that, the bullets' path rises above the treeline and prevailing winds affect it. I do not yet know how to get a read on wind above a tree tunnel over 40" above the ground.

            Once I found my impact and held for about 6' of left to right wind, I was able to put three in a row in a slightly less than MOA "group". That's if you consider a roughly 16-17" 3-shot pattern a group. 15.5 mils elevation at 2745 fps.

            I obviously have a lot to learn yet, but it was still a satisfying day when all is considered.
            That's great shooting. Are you sure that you are only getting 2745 with the Flatlines? Seems like you should be able to get a lot more speed.

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            • #7
              I Should be able to get more speed, but there are a couple things keeping me from doing so. I've only got a Savage 110 FCP that is slightly modified, with a stock 26" barrel. It has a relatively short throat, so, I'm 0.070-0.100" shorter in COAL than the guys getting over 3100 fps. As a result, or for other reasons, I am right at the edge (for me) with only 94 g H1000. My buddy is down at 93 g and getting pressure signs above that. But he gets the same velocity with his bullets seated slightly shorter yet. His jam if loaded any longer.

              As it is, when it gets too hot out and I don't protect the loads from overheating, I'll get hard bolt lift and difficult extraction. That's not a real comfortable place for me and as a result, I'm loathe to push them harder/faster. Even so, I'm not unhappy with this speed, as I get 3-4 SD and the G7 BC of 0.450 has held up really well in my ballistic computer. In the morning, it was in the mid 60s with low humidity and I had to add a tenth or so to the predicted drop, but by early afternoon, in the upper 70s, the calls were spot on with the hits, elevation wise. If they continue to hold up to expectations, I'll still be in my scope and above transonic until about 2150-2175 yds.

              Even with our limited budgets (I know, I know...ELR is not for those with limited budgets), or shall I say, especially with our limited budgets, we are pleased to be making decent hits at some distance. The day started out with three guys shooting custom rigs with Cadex chassis and three poor ol' slobs shooting Salvages on a budget. At the end, it was just two of us ol' slobs still at the firing line 80 yds past where the rest were done getting hits. I do think that it had more to do with the preparation and the loads we were shooting than maybe other factors. We definitely knew our rifles and trusted our loads, as we had tested them well out to 1200 beforehand.

              I suppose that I could be doing worse things than slinging $3 a pop downrange on a beautiful Florida day. ( a rough estimation that includes all component costs with brass amortized over ten loadings).

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              • #8
                BTW, we are both now considering spinning on a good heavy cut rifled barrel 28" long or more with a throat cut specifically to take advantage of these projectiles. If the funds were there, a nice new action would be nice too...but alas, the wallet, she be a bit on the light side.

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