Workouts for 30+ men and woman

jerome.lujan

R33PER
Minuteman
Jan 31, 2019
26
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6
Upstate NY
Hello forums members,

I’d like to hear some opinions and advice on some great weight lifting training that older men could use. I’m 32 years old. 13 years on active federal service with the military. I can definitely tell I am no longer that young 18 year old that can relentlessly throw around weights lol. I find myself focusing on lighter weights and more reps however it has led me to decrease in strength.

Love to hear what are some things I can improve or do.

Thanks in advance
 
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Kickin45

Gunny Sergeant
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Oct 7, 2018
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32 is just getting into your physical prime for weightlifting bud. Train hard and train smart.
Look up Frank Zane’s Mr Olympia training. It’s what I live by.
Im 44 now and could easily kill my
25-30 year old self. I’m bigger, stronger, more defined and wiser than 25.
Do I have the limitless energy I had at 25 or 30, no. But I train smarter and have studied nutrition and negative lift training.
Frank Zane is all you need.
 

Shifter

Dadbod Extraordinaire
Minuteman
Jul 18, 2019
11
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2
Florida
Exactly what he said.
I’m only 31 but do know this, not give my your body time to recover from a hard workout is going to hurt you. Actually hurt you. I have caused permanent damage because I thought I was “good enough” to get back to what hurt me so recently, my left knee will never be right. But I can’t remind you of this.... you can always work another group in low weight high reps for that day, rather than rust real damage.
 
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M8541Reaper

Super Boot
Belligerents
lol older...dude you’re 32, these are the golden years lol. Walker step ups, salad bar shuffles, and bingo broad jumps are now your go-to exercises!

Seriously though man, I’m in my 30’s and former mil as well. You don’t have anything to “worry” about until you hit 50. Find a beginners program that will work with your schedule and stick to it. Get rid of that “I’m old” mindset because that’s going to hurt your progress more than lack of recovery.

Starting Strength is a great program and very easy to keep to, even with the most hectic of full time schedules. Check out Rip’s site (SS) and follow his YouTube channel. If you plan on taking strength training seriously (as in you aren’t going to only do DB curls in the mirror and bench press every Monday), then I’d recommend the Starting Strength book as well.

I have no affiliation with SS but I’ve used Rip’s program and it’s definitely something I recommend to beginners and those looking for a strength program that they’ll get stronger on with a low risk of injury.

Get stronger and everything gets easier.
 

clcustom1911

Non Sibi Sed Patriae
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Oct 23, 2017
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32 is just getting into your physical prime for weightlifting bud. Train hard and train smart.
Look up Frank Zane’s Mr Olympia training. It’s what I live by.
Im 44 now and could easily kill my
25-30 year old self. I’m bigger, stronger, more defined and wiser than 25.
Do I have the limitless energy I had at 25 or 30, no. But I train smarter and have studied nutrition and negative lift training.
Frank Zane is all you need.
This and Steve Reeves' book as well at Combat Strength Training by Pat McNamara.

Fitness not brokeness
 
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MarinePMI

Battery Operated Grunt
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Jun 3, 2010
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Starting Strength and the Barbell Prescription. Quit with the high rep program, it doesn't work well for muscle development/growth and is birthed in the bro-science/muscle mag BS.

Lift heavy (for your fives), understand your programming (and focus on compound lifts), and how it affects your body. Once you hit your late 30's/early 40's you will have to go with what results show you, since men's strength is all over the map until they hit their 70's (genetics and injury history matter). keep a workout log. It'll pay dividends in the long run.

I'm near 50 and still lifting heavy (in spite of recent medical challenges). In fact, every physician I have seen, comments on how I am "in amazingly good shape" for my age. Keep cardio to a minimum, lift heavy, make sure you eat enough (protein and carbs) to hit your calorie goals, and you'll be fine.

JMTCW...
 
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MarinePMI

Battery Operated Grunt
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Not trying to be a dick here, but T-Nation is not what I'd call a reliable source. T-Nation is a like an online muscle mag, chocked full of bro-science and gym legend. That being said, 5/3/1 is a good program, no arguing that.
 
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Wormydog1724

Working on my TyperSnyper PHD
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Jun 26, 2013
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Not trying to be a dick here, but T-Nation is not what I'd call a reliable source. T-Nation is a like an online muscle mag, chocked full of bro-science and gym legend. That being said, 5/3/1 is a good program, no arguing that.

It gives a good explanation and example of the program.
That’s the only reason I linked to it. It’s an old article from what I would call the ‘good ol’ days’ of t-nation.
 
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--BLACKOUT--

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Do yourself a favor and look up Jeff Nichols at Performance First. He has some great programs from lifting, to running, to improving pushups/pull ups. It's all based on science and if you follow him on Instagram, he gives no bullshit information and also does 'live video' chats where you can ask questions. Be careful and do your homework, though, he doesn't mess around with stupid questions. Ask me how I know. :ROFLMAO:

His programs are pretty cheap compared to others but work great if you eat properly and put in the work.
 

OLD308

Sergeant of the Hide
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Jun 8, 2018
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Ah to be 32 again. Had by best BB show at 33. For a simple and easy to get into program, Starting Strength. After that, do what keeps you in the gym and active outside. I will give you a semi agreement about 32. Your diet must change from your 20s. Other than that, as your not a professional athlete that was worn out young, you should be heading into your prime.
 

codym

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Jan 17, 2018
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My 33 225 pound self is better than my 22 240 lb marine Corp version in every way. Lift hard and heavy with intensity and volume to change things up. Make sure your diet is on point drink a ton of water sleep 8 hours and if something hurts honestly ask yourself if your being a pussy or being stupid.... if your injured rest.
 

8pointer

Gunny Sergeant
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Nov 20, 2018
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Hello forums members,

I’d like to hear some opinions and advice on some great weight lifting training that older men could use. I’m 32 years old. 13 years on active federal service with the military. I can definitely tell I am no longer that young 18 year old that can relentlessly throw around weights lol. I find myself focusing on lighter weights and more reps however it has led me to decrease in strength.

Love to hear what are some things I can improve or do.

Thanks in advance
Do you have any injuries to speak of? Other than that sounds like you are just experiencing normal aging. One thing most everyone loses is elasticity....if you are not adding some stretching that will rob your muscles of performance all around. I took up swimming 10 years ago to combat that was huge for me. Good luck enjoy it while you can you young punk!
 

rkgsmith

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As we age more hurts, more is stiff, can't do as much for sure. However if you commit you can do. I've been doing the same PT tests for the last 23 years for work. 60 push-ups, 45 sit-ups in a min, 4 dead hang pull-ups w/35 lbs strapped on, 16 ft rope climb w/35 lbs, 4 flights of stairs in full gear w/45 lb ram, then 5k run under 26 min. Our PT test is not graduated for age, everybody does the same. Is is easy like it was 10 years ago, no it is not. I have bad knees, elbows, and low back issues. Not bragging but I turn 59 next month, 31 years on the job. I see 25-30 year old guys at work everyday that have no motivation to do anything but be fat and lazy. Commit and get it done. Age is in your head.
 

E. Bryant

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Oct 25, 2010
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What I've learned from the other side of 40:

1) Max strength hasn't really fallen off, but it's become far less important.

2) Improving flexibility has become very interesting.

3) Old injuries that I'd forgotten about now come back with occasional reminders that are typically unpleasant. There are a few poor decisions in my past that I'd like to take back.

3) Gaining and maintaining muscle mass is harder, and is less about aesthetics and more about having a sufficient reserve to survive an injury or other extended duration with reduced/non-existent training.

4) Cardio performance has been dramatically affected by the aging process, especially since I kinda ignored it for a 10-15 year stretch. Clawing back some gains in this area seems important for long-term success. It's easy to dismiss the importance of aerobic capacity, but it's an essential component to rapid recovery from anaerobic efforts.

5) Risk mitigation has become an interesting aspect of every workout. Since it takes longer to recover from injuries, avoiding the injury is the best strategy (even if it means missing out on that max lift by a few pounds).

6) Recovery between workouts is more important. I can still put in serious efforts, but it takes more time to come back from them. If I dig a deep hole, it might take more than just a weekend of rest to recover (especially considering that job and family requirements have only gotten worse over the years, and that's stress that must be considered).

7) It's fun to make younger kids look like idiots via technique and old-man strength :p
 

Solby

Private
Hessian
Minuteman
Nov 7, 2019
6
0
2
Try and decide what type of fitness and physique is your goal. Being jacked doesn't necessarily mean healthy. If you plan on using your body for a certain activity incorporate functional lifts or excercises that will benefit you. Flexibility and functional fitness will pay dividends as you age in my opinion. Also, if you are getting back at it after a break take it slow. I found myself overtraining and becoming injured because I wasn't taking care of my body now that I'm in my 30s. Work hard!
 

trevor300wsm

Team Pantydropper
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Nov 8, 2009
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Older at 32......lol!! Fuck me.....
I’m in my “late” 30’s and I’m still doing the same or improved versions of the workouts I did in my 20’s. Now, I will say that I do “feel” the years of banging iron the way I have. I started when I was 20 and it’s been a non stop 5-6 days a week thing for me for almost 20 years. However, I’m bigger and leaner than I ever have been. I’d go back to 32 in a second if I could.
 

CavScout85

Online Training Member
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Older at 32......lol!! Fuck me.....
I’m in my “late” 30’s and I’m still doing the same or improved versions of the workouts I did in my 20’s. Now, I will say that I do “feel” the years of banging iron the way I have. I started when I was 20 and it’s been a non stop 5-6 days a week thing for me for almost 20 years. However, I’m bigger and leaner than I ever have been. I’d go back to 32 in a second if I could.
My low 20's stepson comes home from college and says "Hey Bruh, look at these gains!" I just roll my eyes, knowing at that age you can look at a barbell and make gains, and just tell him to come back in 30 years and let me know how it is going.
 

jwknutson17

Big Game Hunter
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Apr 29, 2017
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I'm in my mid 30s and have a few injuries that hinder a lot of lifts that I can do. I have really bad arthritis in my facet joints in my back from previous injuries. Other rotator cuff Injuries from when I was in my late teens and early twenties that never completely go away. Etc etc. Everyone is different. I try to find a middle ground between excessive weight and reps while still being strong and cut. I hated the way I felt and looked when I was more bulked up. Sure your a little stronger but a Little leaner and more cut was better for my body type and energy levels. Everyone's mileage will vary.
 

FN-Whitney

Sergeant of the Hide
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Minuteman
Jun 14, 2018
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Don't be afraid to lift heavy, I hurt my body more at 25 than I did at 35 by lifting incorrectly. I'm 50 and still put up heavy weights but max reps of 5 and min of 3, no need for max out singles anymore.

Lots of core exercises, I devote 1 day a week to core strength weight training and 1 day to body weight core exercises.

Go easy on the cardio, not to say don't do it but I don't get crazy with it.

Ice packs are your friends, I use them every night, keep the inflammation done and you will be surprised how much better you will feel.