Wolves vs Mountain Lion

Dec 13, 2011
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Georgia
#1
In the same vein as my older thread though a lil more realistic, what usually happens when these two encounter each other? One on one it seems to obviously favor the cat, but then wolves dont usually go it alone.. what do the lions do against packs? Climb a tree and wait em out?
 
Nov 25, 2007
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#2
Let out be known, I'm a dog person.

6 big dogs vs 1 big cat?
I've got my money on the cat.

The dog has its teeth and its buddies.

The cat has 5 weapons with claws and teeth. Add in speed and strength.
It would take a pretty hungry pack to pick that fight.

I could be wrong though.
Waiting to hear responses from those that actually know...
 

diverdon

Online Training Member
Dec 21, 2011
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WNY
#3
Some kinda cage fight, who knows, that would be illegal anyhow. Real life cats run from dogs. Lottsa people shooting cats out of trees that their dogs put there. Sure when cornered the cat will fight, but a cat will run from dogs on it's trail until it is exhausted. The cornered cat might get a dog, but if there is a pack of dogs the end should be a cat sammich.
 

Rthur

Philomath
Apr 16, 2010
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#4
In the same vein as my older thread though a lil more realistic, what usually happens when these two encounter each other? One on one it seems to obviously favor the cat, but then wolves dont usually go it alone.. what do the lions do against packs? Climb a tree and wait em out?
Would rather have wolves in my AO than one sneaky ass cat...
Have seen their tracks many times, haven't laid eyes on one yet.

R
 
Likes: tnichols
Feb 20, 2017
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#8
Would rather have wolves in my AO than one sneaky ass cat...
Have seen their tracks many times, haven't laid eyes on one yet.

R
You won't see it. Cats are basically ambush predators. It will drop on you from a tree or attack from behind. Wolves, on the other hand will come at you from any direction. Their hunting methods are different with the wolf relying on stamina to chase down prey where the cat will sneak up on prey and pounce given the chance. Even the vaunted Cheetah doesn't have much stamina and they are built much differently than a mountain lion. Also, the wolf will go for the legs and then later, the throat where the cat uses its claws to hang on the back and then its fangs to break the spine.
The cat will fight from its back as its secondary weapons are the claws on its hind legs. Can easily disembowl an opponent with them.
The front paws are used for grasping and are formidable as well. Never, unless you enjoy bleeding, try to box with a cat. They will take your fastest jab, hit it on the way in and twice on the way out.
One on one and near equal in size and weight, my money would be on the cat.
 
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Rthur

Philomath
Apr 16, 2010
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#9
You won't see it. Cats are basically ambush predators. It will drop on you from a tree or attack from behind. Wolves, on the other hand will come at you from any direction. Their hunting methods are different with the wolf relying on stamina to chase down prey where the cat will sneak up on prey and pounce given the chance. Even the vaunted Cheetah doesn't have much stamina and they are built much differently than a mountain lion. Also, the wolf will go for the legs and then later, the throat where the cat uses its claws to hang on the back and then its fangs to break the spine.
The cat will fight from its back as its secondary weapons are the claws on its hind legs. Can easily disembowl an opponent with them.
The front paws are used for grasping and are formidable as well. Never, unless you enjoy bleeding, try to box with a cat. They will take your fastest jab, hit it on the way in and twice on the way out.
One on one and near equal in size and weight, my money would be on the cat.
Mt bud ran into one on a elk hunt in 2004.
I was the only one with a sidearm that trip.
Everyone had one the next year.

R
 
Feb 10, 2011
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#10
Saw a documentary a few years back, might have been set in Africa. Also I don’t even remember the species involved.
The takeaway was essentially that adult (experienced) high order predators seldom confront/fight other high order adult predators (of different species) because there is too much to loose, and unless you are starving, so little to gain.
 
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Unknown

Gunny Sergeant
Sep 17, 2009
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#11
I recently had a conversation with someone about predators and what makes them dominant, or not. We both thought it odd that humans are so weak, have such a low power to weight ratio, don't have any claws, venom, fangs, horns, antlers, or other such "weapons". What we do have is a very powerful brain, and the ability to walk upright, and run upright. Although we are slow over the short distances compared to most animals, our bipedal movement allows us great distance ability. There was a recent show a channel like history, science, or discovery that showed a group of African bush people ran down an antelope. Of course the antelope outran them for the first few miles, but after 5-10 miles the African men were still just jogging along and the poor antelope was so exhausted it stood and shook because it literally couldn't run any further. The antelope became dinner. I sort of felt a little sorry for the antelope, but nature is a cruel bitch.
 
Feb 20, 2017
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#12
I recently had a conversation with someone about predators and what makes them dominant, or not. We both thought it odd that humans are so weak, have such a low power to weight ratio, don't have any claws, venom, fangs, horns, antlers, or other such "weapons". What we do have is a very powerful brain, and the ability to walk upright, and run upright. Although we are slow over the short distances compared to most animals, our bipedal movement allows us great distance ability. There was a recent show a channel like history, science, or discovery that showed a group of African bush people ran down an antelope. Of course the antelope outran them for the first few miles, but after 5-10 miles the African men were still just jogging along and the poor antelope was so exhausted it stood and shook because it literally couldn't run any further. The antelope became dinner. I sort of felt a little sorry for the antelope, but nature is a cruel bitch.
Same thing that wolves do. The pack gives them a huge advantage. Alternating chasers with resters, most of the pack will circle to cut off fast prey and even if they can't a wolf can run all day long, maybe not flat out but at say 90% speed. They are built to run with huge chests and consequent lung capacity, lean bodies that are mostly muscle and long legs for their body size. Not as fast as a Greyhound or an Afghan hound but plenty fast enough when you compare relay racers with sprinters. They Afghan can actually run down deer, that is what they were bred for.
 

Rthur

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Apr 16, 2010
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#14

Unknown

Gunny Sergeant
Sep 17, 2009
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#15
Interesting that SubOptimal mentioned Afghan hounds.... I had a friend that used to hunt coyotes professionally in S.E. Oregon, and he got tired of loosing ones he could hear the bullet impact on, so he got relatives of the Afghans, another site hound the Borzoi. He had two of them that would sit one on either side of him while he called the coyotes. Every once in a while, the dogs would see a coyote that he had missed, and he would just look at where the Borzoi's noses pointed.

He said when he would release the Borzois to chase down a coyote, it was like watching an F-4 phantom chase down a little piper cub. The Coyotes would have to go around much of the sage, and the Borzoi could run over the top of much of the low sage (18"-24") without having to zig zag around. He said it was really cool to watch.

The Borzoi would run up to the coyotes, grab the coyote by the back of it's neck and do something that was like tossing the coyote over their shoulder while they continued running and holding onto the back of the coyote;'s neck. Apparently, it would break the coyotes neck, and the Borzoi would just sit there next to the carcass and wait for him.

All went great until they got out of his back yard, and ran down a neighbor's dog in the street. That was the end of his Borzoi experience.
 
Feb 20, 2017
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#16
My Afghan was young and stupid, we lived in the city and she was much more of a lap dog than a hunter. Gorgeous animal but really tough to maintain with that coat. I one watched her respond to a call by my father, whom she loved. She was on the other side of a parked car when he called her. Two steps and right over a 71 Ford Galaxy, not the hood or trunk, the damn roof! Silly thing could run all day and would, given the opportunity. She ran away one day and got hit by a bus. Sad day.
 
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