Wind Studies

TexasTightwad

Sergeant of the Hide
May 30, 2018
252
114
43
DFW, Texas
#3
I found the kite flying one decently infomative, bit the meteorological lecture one not so much. But then again, it dealt with mountains mostly, and there are none near me, so someone in a mountainous region might get more out of it.
 

Skookum

Flattus Domini
May 6, 2017
1,005
938
113
Your mom's
#4
I found the kite flying one decently infomative, bit the meteorological lecture one not so much. But then again, it dealt with mountains mostly, and there are none near me, so someone in a mountainous region might get more out of it.
Yeah, they weren't obviously written for shooters, but there is good info to glean from the illustrations especially. If you know of any other good ones, post them up. I'll steal from anywhere I can.:)
 
Dec 26, 2013
206
36
28
Edmonton, Alberta, Canada
#5
That kite one was great, haven't read #2 yet. I like the examples he gives and the pictures. I can't tell you how many times I've heard people say "Wind is like water" and they leave it at that. Best bits were wind shadows and compressed air around hills.
 
Likes: Skookum

TexasTightwad

Sergeant of the Hide
May 30, 2018
252
114
43
DFW, Texas
#6
Yeah, the wind shadows were what I found most informative. Not much you can do to get away from shooting through one, but at least you will realize it is there.
 
Dec 26, 2013
206
36
28
Edmonton, Alberta, Canada
#9
Hey, I got thinking about this thread today and was wondering if there are any rules of thumb to help predict wind speed at max ordinance? given we know the speed 5 ft from the ground and type of vegetation. To keep it simple I guess we ignore terrain and assume its flat.

My guess is that prairies will be 30-40% faster at max ord that 5 ft above ground and that wooded areas would be much more. But I really dont know.
 

Skookum

Flattus Domini
May 6, 2017
1,005
938
113
Your mom's
#10
Hey, I got thinking about this thread today and was wondering if there are any rules of thumb to help predict wind speed at max ordinance? given we know the speed 5 ft from the ground and type of vegetation. To keep it simple I guess we ignore terrain and assume its flat.

My guess is that prairies will be 30-40% faster at max ord that 5 ft above ground and that wooded areas would be much more. But I really dont know.
It depends on terrain of course, but if the vegetation is no more than a couple of feet high and the ground is fairly level, then I tend to think of the next wind gradient starting between 15-20 feet above ground level in relatively average conditions.

The other thing is this, the faster the wind is blowing the more these layers compress. The boundary layer next to the ground might be 25 ft high at 0-3 mph, 15 ft high at 5-8 mph, and 5 ft high at 10+mph.

If I am shooting far enough to pass into the next highest wind gradient, I add 30% to the wind for the time the bullet will be in that gradient. That sounds technical, but when boiled down it just means that most of the time I need to add and additional 1 or 2 tenths to my wind call.

The only time it really comes into play is at ELR distances. The bullet might spend half it's flight time in the next higher gradient.
 
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Likes: Seymour Fish
Sep 21, 2008
71
46
18
#13
This type of discussion is so much more beneficial to me than merely holding my Kestrel 5700 in front of my face and pretending it did something to improce my wind call. The wind value I care the absolute least about is what I get from the Kestrel. The projectile hangs out a bit longer @ 800-1350y.... I care about that.

Yep... I just talked myself into selling it. One time used Kestrel w/ AB for sale...purdy orange so you don't lose it. No guarantees you can get it to work with your Android. I couldn't handle that part.
 

Skookum

Flattus Domini
May 6, 2017
1,005
938
113
Your mom's
#14
This type of discussion is so much more beneficial to me than merely holding my Kestrel 5700 in front of my face and pretending it did something to improce my wind call. The wind value I care the absolute least about is what I get from the Kestrel. The projectile hangs out a bit longer @ 800-1350y.... I care about that.

Yep... I just talked myself into selling it. One time used Kestrel w/ AB for sale...purdy orange so you don't lose it. No guarantees you can get it to work with your Android. I couldn't handle that part.
The best use for a kestrel is calibrating your brain. If you sell that expensive model, get the bottom of the line model and live with it around your neck a while.

Wind at the shooter will not tell you directly what is going on downrange, but it is foundational for deciphering the rest of the puzzle.
 
Dec 26, 2013
206
36
28
Edmonton, Alberta, Canada
#15
Haha I'm too poor to do things the right way. So learning the wind may be the long way around but it sure does work. I have a kestrel 1500 and it doesn't do a whole lot but since dedicating time to learning the wind it's been very effective. I dont know that I can base my whole wind call off my senses but understanding it has brought be a long way. If I traveled to matches I'd probably invest in a AB.

I've found that using the BC as a base line MPH has been amazing! I do all my wind in my head and get good hits, I'm considering a more difficult caliber to learn more on now.

The two things I'd like to focus on more are up/down drafts and wind clocks. I think I've over simplified my wind clock but I'm always ready to learn.

I had a target in a "valley" on a bluff that was facing the wind. The wind funneled in and up and pushed me 1/2 mil up. How do you identify updrafts and adjust? I see this being a weakness for hunting.
 

Seymour Fish

New Hide Member
Oct 30, 2018
15
6
3
#17
It depends on terrain of course, but if the vegetation is no more than a couple of feet high and the ground is fairly level, then I tend to think of the next wind gradient starting between 15-20 feet above ground level in relatively average conditions.

The other thing is this, the faster the wind is blowing the more these layers compress. The boundary layer next to the ground might be 25 ft high at 0-3 mph, 15 ft high at 5-8 mph, and 5 ft high at 10+mph.

If I am shooting far enough to pass into the next highest wind gradient, I add 30% to the wind for the time the bullet will be in that gradient. That sounds technical, but when boiled down it just means that most of the time I need to add and additional 1 or 2 tenths to my wind call.

The only time it really comes into play is at ELR distances. The bullet might spend half it's flight time in the next higher gradient.
Your max ordinate comment is on the money and not addressed in ballistic solvers as the data is hard to obtain in real-time. Truly 3-D