Will my retarded DIY equipment idea actually work?

TheGerman

Oberleutnant
Jan 25, 2010
3,886
1,187
113
Out West
#1
If its stupid and it works, its no longer stupid.

Question is, will it work?

Problem I am facing is 99% of the land in southern Utah to shoot on is loose sand/packed sand/sand with rocks in it. See a pattern here?

While this in itself isn't the end of the world, the problem is that after a few shots your bipod is an inch deep in the sand or has started digging itself a grave in the ground. Problem here isn't as much with the bipod height as it is with the repercussions of what happens with recoil management while your loaded bipod is working itself into the ground with each shot and it's only a matter of time depending on the type of sandy ground it is. Never a big issue for hunting or running drills as you are constantly shooting on new ground, but for practicing or shooting from a great practice spot where you have steel/targets set up on; its fucking obnoxious.

I've tried shooting mats and other various things but over time the sand underneath just starts giving way around the pressure points of the bipod feet.

So my high tech idea? Get some thicker plywood, make either a full length shooting mat size version or one thats only maybe 2 feet x 2 foot and attach a single 2x4 to one end on its side as kind of a lip to load the bipod feet against. I'm guessing the hard footprint of the plywood (or whatever board I'd use) would deter the bipod pressure points as well as being able to load the bipod against the 2x4.

Question here is, would loading the bipod feet properly into the stationary 2x4 thats laying on its side, attached to the board deter anything with recoil due to the bipod recoiling off a hard surface? I'm guessing I'd need the 2x4 up front unless I just somehow textured the board, so that I could have something that would 'grab' the bipod feet as they would otherwise just slide on the smooth wood board.

Anyone every tried anything like this? Holes in my plan?
 

jpgolffl

Sergeant of the Hide
Jun 21, 2017
622
189
43
Tallahassee, FL
#2
Why not cut a 6” by however wide your shooting mat is piece of 1/2” plywood to put on/under the mat? Hell you could permanently attach it to the underside of the mat and let it fold up with the mat. Don’t overthink it.
 
Feb 20, 2017
315
60
28
76
SE Florida
#4
I see one potential drawback. Shouldn't be too hard to overcome though.
The smooth surface of the plywood is going to act like a skid atop a set of ball bearings. Try loading the bipod and your gonna take off forward. You would have to make it long enough to at least get your chest and maybe even your hips down on it.
Another thing, you really don't need a 2x4 to load against. 1x2 should be more than enough.
 

MarinePMI

Battery Operated Grunt
Jun 3, 2010
2,483
911
113
San Diego, Ca
#8
We do something similar here at our range (which has a sandy area in front of each position that shooters have to shoot from). It's either a 1'x2' 3/4" piece of plywood laid in front of the shooting mat, or something similar, but with a 3/4"x3/4"x2' piece of wood attached to the plywood's forward edge. This allows the bi-pod to be loaded against the small lip that the wood creates. We keep some at the range, and some guys have their own (and attach a screen door/cabinet handle to one side for ease of picking up and carrying back to their vehicle). It looks weird, but it works.

Some even make a full blown drawer like box with the lip on it, to raise the bipod up some (we have some pretty elevated/high angle long range targets). Visually it looks like a drawer flipped upside down, with a lip along the bottom back of the drawer (which now faces up). Again, door handle on the side for ease of movement.
 

FatBoy

Chris Hayes, Nashville TN
Jul 29, 2001
806
239
43
44
Nashville, Tennessee
#9
There is no reason it won't work. I agree the 1x2 is probably enough to load the bipod against. You won't get that much hop that it will come off of or jump the "stop strip", espacially with a CM. You may need to play with spikes to anchor the board or make it long enough to lay on. At that point, it's essentially a table top without legs.

If you have a mat with the straps/pockets for bipod feet I wonder if slicing open the side and sliding in a flexible or roll up plastic cutting board under the pockets would be enough to distribute the load and keep the sand under the bipod from shifting? Then, no extra gear to drag out or forget.
 

Mr.BR

Private
Oct 5, 2017
206
152
43
#10
We tend to use the scope covers as bipod support when shoting on soft sand. Works realy well and unless you are using spikes on bipod feet you will not damage the scope cover

 

Subwrx300

Sergeant of the Hide
Jan 15, 2014
539
210
43
Cedar Springs, MI
#11
Have you considered attaching a piece of synthetic turf to a thin board? Like the kind used for golfmats? That stuff is durable, foldable and creates plenty of drag to load into depending on your bipod feet. Something like this:

https://express.google.com/u/0/prod...oyayyivmf,eid-dqdncagwvd&utm_campaign=8175035

Screenshot_20180708-100749.png

You could tie Paracord through the corners to your mat to keep it tethered from sliding under recoil or even stake it down into the ground.
 
Feb 18, 2017
189
33
28
#12
If it’s a spot where you regularly shoot from, why not get a sack of quick crete and pour a small pad with lip troweled into it. If it’s that sandy, you could dig out the area a couple inches deep and let the excavated edge be the form.
 
Likes: Subwrx300

Subwrx300

Sergeant of the Hide
Jan 15, 2014
539
210
43
Cedar Springs, MI
#13
If it’s a spot where you regularly shoot from, why not get a sack of quick crete and pour a small pad with lip troweled into it. If it’s that sandy, you could dig out the area a couple inches deep and let the excavated edge be the form.
Now that's a GREAT idea! I'm gonna do that that at my range!
 

Greg Langelius *

Resident Elder Fart
Aug 10, 2001
5,385
661
113
Arizona, good place for me...
#14
For years, I carried a super sized Frisbee and set my bipod up on top of this inverted Frisbee. Solved this issue completely.

Now, in Arizona, the desert ground is about the consistency of concrete; so I no longer need to pack the Frisbee around. Plus, at 72, nobody's ever gonna get me to crawl around on the ground anyway.

If I had it to do again, all I'd change would be to paint the Captain America shield pattern on it, in subdued camo mode.

Humor mode off... Arr, Arr....

Greg
 

Skookum

Flattus Domini
May 6, 2017
696
582
93
Your mom's
#16
If its stupid and it works, its no longer stupid.

Question is, will it work?

Problem I am facing is 99% of the land in southern Utah to shoot on is loose sand/packed sand/sand with rocks in it. See a pattern here?

While this in itself isn't the end of the world, the problem is that after a few shots your bipod is an inch deep in the sand or has started digging itself a grave in the ground. Problem here isn't as much with the bipod height as it is with the repercussions of what happens with recoil management while your loaded bipod is working itself into the ground with each shot and it's only a matter of time depending on the type of sandy ground it is. Never a big issue for hunting or running drills as you are constantly shooting on new ground, but for practicing or shooting from a great practice spot where you have steel/targets set up on; its fucking obnoxious.

I've tried shooting mats and other various things but over time the sand underneath just starts giving way around the pressure points of the bipod feet.

So my high tech idea? Get some thicker plywood, make either a full length shooting mat size version or one thats only maybe 2 feet x 2 foot and attach a single 2x4 to one end on its side as kind of a lip to load the bipod feet against. I'm guessing the hard footprint of the plywood (or whatever board I'd use) would deter the bipod pressure points as well as being able to load the bipod against the 2x4.

Question here is, would loading the bipod feet properly into the stationary 2x4 thats laying on its side, attached to the board deter anything with recoil due to the bipod recoiling off a hard surface? I'm guessing I'd need the 2x4 up front unless I just somehow textured the board, so that I could have something that would 'grab' the bipod feet as they would otherwise just slide on the smooth wood board.

Anyone every tried anything like this? Holes in my plan?
I have had similar challenges. I have come up with two solutions, and use either one depending on the area I'm going to.

Solution #1 - I went and got a remnant of carpet that was 4 ft wide and 8 ft long. I took a 2x4 that is 4 ft long and rolled it up in the carpet at one end and stapled the fuck out of it and some small nails with washers under them for good measure. When I'm done shooting, I just roll up the carpet on the 2x4 and put it in the back of the truck.

Solution #2 - I got a 3ft x 2ft piece of matting for a horse stall. They sell them here at the Tractor Supply Store. One side is smooth, and the other side has small ridges to give the horses more grip. I took 5"x 1/4" bolts and put them through at each corner and used washers on both sides. The ribbed side is up. I then sharpend the bolts. So I just push the bolts into the ground like spikes to keep the mat in place, and the ribbed surface is on top to give a grippy surface for the bipod. You wouldn't have to use bolts, You could just use big ass spikes if they are available in your area, I just used what I had on hand.
 
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kRcu

Full Member
Jun 5, 2013
638
167
43
Denver, CO
#19
I have shot in southern Utah numerous times and understand what you are talking about. We usually lay a tarp down that extends a couple feet forward of my mat. I like the tarp as I can eject rounds, and if laying in sand, the tarp tend to roll all of the brass back to me.

I’ve also used one of the flexible baseball bases, as they have a grid on the bottom and tend to stay were you put them.
 

WATERWALKER

0311 SHELLBACK
Apr 19, 2014
619
134
43
Deep in the Lone Star
#20
Have you considered attaching a piece of synthetic turf to a thin board? Like the kind used for golfmats? That stuff is durable, foldable and creates plenty of drag to load into depending on your bipod feet. Something like this:

https://express.google.com/u/0/prod...oyayyivmf,eid-dqdncagwvd&utm_campaign=8175035

View attachment 6920212

You could tie Paracord through the corners to your mat to keep it tethered from sliding under recoil or even stake it down into the ground.
I’d recommend this as a starting point if using the method above. Drill two holes at 3 & 9 o’clock positions and make loops w/ 550 cord. Using the loops secure w/ tent pegs in sand.

If you pour a pad using Quickcrete, I’d pour it at least 12” X 12” X 4” deep. I little mesh or re-bar wouldn’t hurt & it’ll last a long time. You could broom finish it & that should be sufficient to load your bipod. Also, if pouring a pad you can make your own lip at the front.

***With this option your not limited to a square shape either. You can pour a little bigger pad in the shape of a fan so you can shoot 180* should you feel the need.
 
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May 15, 2011
345
23
18
69
#21
For Ftr shooting with bipod, it is common to use a heavy mat or board to address this situation. Many styles as most are homemade. I use 3/4" plywood with carpet glued on top. For stability a piece of angle iron is on the bottom of each end, this rail runs parallel to the direction of the barrel and prevents rocking vs if only the flat board was laid on an uneven surface. For extremely porus surface such as sand, instead of steel rail use a wider rail such as 1/2" board to "float" on the sand.
 

sinister

Gunny Sergeant
Apr 16, 2002
1,586
16
38
Park City, Utah
#23
The door mat and a piece of 2x4 with holes drilled in it to take stakes pounded into the ground gives you a surface you won't sink into, and a stop for you to put forward tension on the bipod.
 

Clearlight

Full Member
Jul 23, 2014
722
251
63
Brisbane Australia
#24
Some good ideas in this thread , I’ve seen FTR guys drag a 24 inch by 10 inch plank of steel with carpet
glued to the top , up to the firing line before ! I’ve had that problem , any more than 3 or so shots and the
legs are drilling in . A buddy has some 1 x 1 sections of pine sewn into a shooting mat , and that worked
fine on the soft stuff . I’ve used pack covers , towels , folded jackets etc . If it works it ain’t stupid .
 
Likes: joetuono

BearNaked

Beer Saved The World
Feb 13, 2017
504
106
43
Texas
#25
so going off of what you were saying, why not just use a 2x6 x however long you want it. take 1" dowel rods cut to 1" in the back and 2" in the front. since every shot your bipod sinks in the sand, now the dowel rods will sink and provide a stable platform. With the different lengths of dowel rods, this will give it a slight angle back to you with a more stable preload. maybe not, but something to think about.
 
Aug 21, 2007
1,333
352
83
#26
In the snow I have used a full sized paper IPSC in a garbage bag.

Frisbee is the winner, I’ve seen that work.

FWIW - as a fellow field shooter, I believe the ski feet are substantially better that any form of post or spike. YMMV
 
Oct 5, 2017
206
152
43
#27
are those the TAB Gear covers?
No idea just pasted a random pic, i myself use a custom made cover with tailored bottom part that also covers magazine and trigger ,but generaly looks similar and reading this above i am suprised what people are willing to bring to the range!.

Scope cover is already on the rifle , its padded and when used under bipod on soft sand it will work similar to a mat.
 

Nik H

Constantly Learning
Jan 22, 2014
3,649
1,415
113
Rhode Island
#29
If its stupid and it works, its no longer stupid.

Question is, will it work?

Problem I am facing is 99% of the land in southern Utah to shoot on is loose sand/packed sand/sand with rocks in it. See a pattern here?

While this in itself isn't the end of the world, the problem is that after a few shots your bipod is an inch deep in the sand or has started digging itself a grave in the ground. Problem here isn't as much with the bipod height as it is with the repercussions of what happens with recoil management while your loaded bipod is working itself into the ground with each shot and it's only a matter of time depending on the type of sandy ground it is. Never a big issue for hunting or running drills as you are constantly shooting on new ground, but for practicing or shooting from a great practice spot where you have steel/targets set up on; its fucking obnoxious.

I've tried shooting mats and other various things but over time the sand underneath just starts giving way around the pressure points of the bipod feet.

So my high tech idea? Get some thicker plywood, make either a full length shooting mat size version or one thats only maybe 2 feet x 2 foot and attach a single 2x4 to one end on its side as kind of a lip to load the bipod feet against. I'm guessing the hard footprint of the plywood (or whatever board I'd use) would deter the bipod pressure points as well as being able to load the bipod against the 2x4.

Question here is, would loading the bipod feet properly into the stationary 2x4 thats laying on its side, attached to the board deter anything with recoil due to the bipod recoiling off a hard surface? I'm guessing I'd need the 2x4 up front unless I just somehow textured the board, so that I could have something that would 'grab' the bipod feet as they would otherwise just slide on the smooth wood board.

Anyone every tried anything like this? Holes in my plan?
Maybe I am misunderstanding you but have you looked at the crosstac mat with bipod loading lip?
 

TheGerman

Oberleutnant
Jan 25, 2010
3,886
1,187
113
Out West
#32
Just buy the crosstac
So sell me on this.

I have the TAB mat everyone and their grandmother has and its too thin/flimsy to deter the pressure from the loaded bipod feet on a Harris from eventually working their way into the sand over time. Albeit much slower than without the mat, but it still moves from the recoil/sand.

How thick/sturdy is the Crosstac? What is it putting between the gun and the ground?

eta - Found a video. So it's foam and cordura. Ok. I'm assuming you have one? From my issue above, how likely is it this solves my problem 100%?
 
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Mooncake

Sergeant of the Hide
May 29, 2018
236
198
43
Central Mountains, CO
#33
I think the crosstac will solve your problem. If needed in deep soft sand, you could bring along one of these to put underneath and increase the rigidity

https://www.sunandski.com/p/3468025...HpB7tpG-5Fv9oZCdWY4QiUghGQv5E7dxoCAS0QAvD_BwE

But I don't think you'll need to. The crosstac is so cush, I'm wondering what I did before I had one. Those little blue roll up sleds have a million uses too. Be a lot easier to transport than wood.
 
Mar 17, 2017
74
11
8
#34
I’m not familiar with the TAB gear mat, so you may need to adjust the placement to get your mat to still fold, but here’s what I did with a standard midway mat:

Take your existing mat, buy a grommet kit. (Grommets are the metal eyelets commonly seen on tarps and banners)

Install grommets about 6” left and right of where your bipod legs make contact with the mat.

Buy a 3/4” or larger wooden dowel rod, or aluminum bar/tube stock. Drill both ends with a through hole. Secure the dowel to the grommets with paracord or whatever.

Now you can load your bipod against the dowel, and your body weight acts as the counterweight as opposed to the rifle eating into the sand.

With this solution the mat can still be rolled up, and doesn’t involve laying concrete, golf training supplies, a fabrication shop or carpentry skills.

As others mentioned, the door mat is a good failsafe.
 

Nik H

Constantly Learning
Jan 22, 2014
3,649
1,415
113
Rhode Island
#35
So sell me on this.

I have the TAB mat everyone and their grandmother has and its too thin/flimsy to deter the pressure from the loaded bipod feet on a Harris from eventually working their way into the sand over time. Albeit much slower than without the mat, but it still moves from the recoil/sand.

How thick/sturdy is the Crosstac? What is it putting between the gun and the ground?

eta - Found a video. So it's foam and cordura. Ok. I'm assuming you have one? From my issue above, how likely is it this solves my problem 100%?
I think it is the best mat out there. I have gone to a couple of classes where you spend all day in the prone position and the comfort is second to none. It is way thicker than most mats and due to the construction, it holds its shape.

The rail just works. I can load the bipod properly regardless of what the mat is laying on. You have the thickness of the mat always providing a solid surface and the rail always provides the stop to take the load on the bipod.

Quite frankly, it is genius. The only down side is that it is $$$ and it isn't all that portable. I do have a second mat that is a roll up type if I need to haul it around. However, if I am shooting in one spot for a while, I always take the crosstac.
 
Jun 26, 2012
2,646
1,338
113
N. Carolina
#36
So sell me on this.

I have the TAB mat everyone and their grandmother has and its too thin/flimsy to deter the pressure from the loaded bipod feet on a Harris from eventually working their way into the sand over time. Albeit much slower than without the mat, but it still moves from the recoil/sand.

How thick/sturdy is the Crosstac? What is it putting between the gun and the ground?

eta - Found a video. So it's foam and cordura. Ok. I'm assuming you have one? From my issue above, how likely is it this solves my problem 100%?
It’s so good I’ve used it as a sleeping pad.
 
Likes: Nik H

TheGerman

Oberleutnant
Jan 25, 2010
3,886
1,187
113
Out West
#43
@TheGerman did you ever build/buy something based on above? How did it work out?
So I bought a Crosstac mat. Overall, I like it and its built extremely well. The only downside to it for my use is that if you don't have a large flat area to use it on, or if the ground you are putting it on is uneven with pockets of missing ground, the mat has a bit of give in it as far as loading it onto the front ridge meant for your bipod and then getting some side to side play.

Not really the mat's fault, but its something that I noticed right off, actually spoke to the designer about (really nice guy BTW) and then identified what was causing the issue. Again not the mat's fault, but it also isn't a 100% fix as yes, it keeps me from loading the bipod and sinking the legs or it not grabbing and pushing forward but then now also introduces lateral movement because the ground I'm on doesn't give the footprint of the mat a large enough footprint to settle on.

I was actually going to try a rubber mat or fake grass and put tent stakes on the corners next. :D
 
Jul 2, 2014
341
50
28
London, KY
#44
Damnit. This thread has likely costed me another $200. I had Tony sew a bipod rail into my TAB mat, and it works quite well, but Tony never designed the mat to do that. As a result, if you use the bipod rail you're damn near having your dick in the dirt hanging off the back of the mat and you miss the padding completely. No big deal in grassy fields and groomed spots, pretty messy otherwise.

This also gives me an idea for a hellish stage at the next PRS Club match.......
 
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