Training away from the range.

K.B.808

Online Training Member
Apr 24, 2018
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28
Maui, Hi
#1
What would be a reasonable amount of time can one expect to have to put in to get “up to speed” as far as knowing the necessary ballistics and formulas that go into long range precision shooting? I mean for a person to go from having no intimate knowledge to being able to calculate firing solutions on their own. This really makes me wish I’d have paid more attention in school. If anyone could recommend good sources that put things into layman’s terms I’d appreciate it. I’d like to find ways to progress as much as I can while away from the field and don’t mind having to hit the books.
 
Aug 21, 2007
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#3
KB, most folks use a phone app. and record their own data. In addition to an app, I also find use in Adaptive dope cards. As for facts and figures and things to commit to memory and whatnot - that is largely related to ranging, which is related to fractionalizing, which is related to holds, which is related to speed.

In the mean time, get yourself a MIL Dot Master.

Then again, there are probably some here who manually calc DA for funzies
 
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K.B.808

Online Training Member
Apr 24, 2018
150
36
28
Maui, Hi
#4
Thanks guys. Everywhere I look I see Applied Ballistics by Litz as the best source to start with. Wondering if it's worth it to just get that book or one of the bundles. The MIL Dot Master will definitely be picked up as well. Mike- thanks for the way you put things into perspective as to how all the pieces fit together. Trying to digest everything at once is a bit much.
 

TEDean

Online Training Member
Mar 22, 2017
13
7
3
Colorado
#5
I have been on a steep learning curve for two years. Seems a long time, but you never quit learning new stuff, applying it and fine tuning it : )

I have progressed using and understanding everything about the Kestrel 5700, taking classes https://cprifle.com/pages/about-us (Brian applies the use of the Kestrel, developing range cards, field shooting), reading Accuracy and Precision for Long Range Shooting, Bryan Litz and reading everything you can on this forum, 65Guys, etc. I know your question was asking about time required, not sure there is a good answer.
 
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K.B.808

Online Training Member
Apr 24, 2018
150
36
28
Maui, Hi
#6
Thanks TEDean. I don’t think two years is that long when it comes to learning to do something you enjoy at a higher level. I’m trying to figure out what model Kestrel meets my needs and budget... mostly my budget.
 

Acer76

Sergeant of the Hide
May 28, 2018
103
35
28
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Cincinnati
#7
What would be a reasonable amount of time can one expect to have to put in to get “up to speed” as far as knowing the necessary ballistics and formulas that go into long range precision shooting? I mean for a person to go from having no intimate knowledge to being able to calculate firing solutions on their own. This really makes me wish I’d have paid more attention in school. If anyone could recommend good sources that put things into layman’s terms I’d appreciate it. I’d like to find ways to progress as much as I can while away from the field and don’t mind having to hit the books.
If you’re passionate about precision shooting, time issues fade away. You already want to learn so each lesson becomes very gratifying and you’ll begin to transition from lesson to lesson, improving all the way.

Being “up to speed” is already accomplished: for you. Because you are learning at your speed. And I think that each day you get better was a day well spent. There’s your gratification. If this was easy, less people would be so invested!

You are doing all the right stuff. Shooting whenever possible is great but maximizing your time and learning or confirming something with each outing is progress.

Looks like you have enough interest to pursue theory. I have found that alone leads you down the right path. Definitely participate on this site. And never let the assholes lurking deter your determination! Just don’t engage and someone will answer. Folks around here are very good that way.

You’ll have a lot of questions you know have been asked and answered somewhere here.
Here’s a tip —
I learned by asking on this site how to efficiently search this site:

Google/Bing- type your query then type
“site:forum.snipershide.com”
This channels the power of the search engine and limits results to this site.

Example:
try using this site’s search feature to find “The Fix by Q” you’ll get nothing.
Now, go to google and type:
“The Fix by Q site:forum.snipershide.com” and BOOM. You got something to work with!

Best of luck in developing your skills and knowledge. Obviously, I’m on the same path!
 

TripleBull

This one goes to 11
Feb 13, 2017
2,499
4,767
113
Sunny Colorado
#8
KB808: If you have not already started a documentation scheme, you should start building it now. I use Impact Data Books for now but I'm working up a design that I'll substitute in soon. The point is that any app is a starting point and you'll need to make adjustments like ballistic coefficient calibration and in order to do that right, you need to take the time to document the temperature, barometric pressure, scope dope, etc.

The advice above on the Litz books is solid. I have the whole set and like them. What other gear do you have already? Range finder? Chronograph? Kestrel or equivalent? All those have learning curves, so you'll need to make decisions and study their quirks too. Good luck!
 
Feb 15, 2005
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Mission, KS
www.donttouchme.com
#9
Things mentioned I concur with: MilDot master, ballistic computer (and using it, in concert with Kestrel and LRF if you have them), and data book.

Also:
  • Dry fire. If you can do so safely, which can be hard with a bolt rifle and simulating range (don't point out the window at the neighbors). I have sometimes removed the bolt and left the bore guide in, for example. No trigger, but you can mess with positional shooting. Or even, just your basic prone, use of sling and bipod, etc. Especially not on the range, you can sit there and see how long you can hold steady, and that sort of stuff exposes discomfort or other gaps in your position.
  • Go to the gym. Figure out what is sore from that work, build up those muscles to be able to hold the gun up better.
  • Games. Digital ones. Forget (and cannot find!) my old one, but computer/iPad simulators to get used to reading wind, ranging, etc. This is one I have not used, as an example: http://www.148apps.com/app/1136962630/
 

K.B.808

Online Training Member
Apr 24, 2018
150
36
28
Maui, Hi
#10
Thank you Acer76, TripleBull and shoobe01. I appreciate all the direction I can get and it’s been all good thus far. So much info is out there and so many different approaches.
 
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