The Welding and Metalworking Thread

Bradu

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I saw that on Facebook and had to share it with a few people that I could see doing it 😂
 

Bradu

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Made this the other morning at work. Took about 5 hours to layout, cut and weld. I highly recommend fireball squares if I haven't already said that in this thread. I bought some about 2 years ago and they are awesome for squaring shit up. I am 1/16" out of square on the project and never once checked for square with a tape until the end of the project.
20190521_165154.jpg
 

barneybdb

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Congrats on the new machine, what did you pick up?
If you haven't messed with stick on inverters, just keep in mind that most won't run a 6010, so just go with a 6011 for those applications.

I ran across this ridiculous toy at a pawn shop and had to give it a try:

View attachment 7076247

It's probably smaller than a 50lb box of electrodes. I have no idea what I'll do with it, but I maxed the setting and tried it out using a heavy 100ft extension cord from a crappy generator and it still maintained a decent arc on 3/32 7018 and 1/8 6011. With that setup I think a 3/32 6011 would've been right in the sweet spot.

I currently have two trucks, with most of my tools and the multi-process machine in one, so that little guy rides in the non-work truck.
Michigan 140A arc Tig welder.

7083035
 

Bradu

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Anyone build steps out of steel? I'm looking for idea on design and material for job trailer steps. They want them light enough that two people can lift them into the trailer. 4' wide and 4 steps total and I have to have removable hand rails.
 
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Sean the Nailer

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Steps out of steel, Yes.
Light enough to move around, not-so-much.

When I built steps years ago, I used those galvanized cat-walk preformed tread section-thingy's..... (I can't for the life of me remember what the hell they're called.) They were strong enough, and light enough, sure. But the real weight is going to be in your stringers.

On a whole different note, there is the 'escalator style' of aluminum steps, if you want to go a completely different tangent. Just being difficult. Hope that helps. ;)
 

Major Wader

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If you need job trailer step that can easily be moved, look up a company called ErectaStep

We have hundreds of the stair, ladder, and platform units in service. Component structure, OSHA compliant, made of aluminum.

Unless you are Barney, then they're made of aluminium.
 

1moaoff

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Anyone build steps out of steel? I'm looking for idea on design and material for job trailer steps. They want them light enough that two people can lift them into the trailer. 4' wide and 4 steps total and I have to have removable hand rails.
Aluminum prebuilt components you would need to add the rails
 

Geno C.

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What sized men need to lift them? Out of steel is fine for permanent but shitty for portable. They make the perforated treads that are already stamped with grip texture on top. That will be your lightest option
 
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Sean the Nailer

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This is the stuff that we used to use. "Diamond Grip Stair Tread" though we used to use it for mezzanine and catwalk surface, too.

Oh Yeah: Learn vicariously from one of my co-workers! Do Not walk across a floor made of this stuff, with your hands in your pockets. If (when) you trip and fall, you probably won't have time (again) to pull your hands out of your cover-all pockets. So you don't want to break your nose, scratch the shit out of your face and forehead, and destroy your glasses (again).

HAHAHahahahaahahaaaaaaaaaaaaaa

I'm just sayin'....
 

Bradu

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What sized men need to lift them? Out of steel is fine for permanent but shitty for portable. They make the perforated treads that are already stamped with grip texture on top. That will be your lightest option
They said use steel so that's what I'm doing. The boss said 1 1/4 square tube and expanded metal to cover the steps. It looks like with 14 gauge tube that it will be about 130 lbs. Not ideal but they should be able to tilt it into the trailer. We shall see. I was looking at the bar grating last night thinking it would be better but oh well, I won't be lifting it.
 

Geno C.

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Must not be very big guys using the stairs... 4’ wide with only 14ga 1-1/4 tube will bend in the middle...
 

Bradu

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We are going to try without a stronger in the .middle but bought enough to build it with one
 

Major Wader

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The ErectaStep units can be easily moved by 2 men. Very light, and very strong.

Bolt together, so no hot work required.
 

Bradu

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The ErectaStep units can be easily moved by 2 men. Very light, and very strong.

Bolt together, so no hot work required.
If it was me, I would have bought steps. With material and labor involved, this really doesn't make sense to me. I looked up some that we could have bought pretty reasonable. Not the first time I have seen this by bigger companies.
 

Flint62a1

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One of my last projects before I retired was to make this tractor a flatbedIMG_8516_LI.jpgIt was one of a pair we had picked up through the surplus program for local governments. It started like this IMG_8423.JPGIMG_8460.JPGit ended up like this
IMG_8519.JPGThe only photos I didn't get was the rear crash bar setup. I also never got any photos of it loaded down. The dockbuilder used it to haul all kinds of material.
Most of my time was spent trying to repair very old tugs, barges and crane barges, nasty smelly shitty work, so I looked forward to these fabrication jobs.
 

Bradu

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The start of my steps. I think they will be fine without a stringer in the middle. There is very little flex with me bouncing on one bar and I'm 200 lbs. I will test with a couple people tomorrow when I finish it up. I am buying a carbide blade saw after this, finer wheels flex more than I like on the angled cuts even going slow.20190603_165214.jpg
 

bogeybrown

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The start of my steps. I think they will be fine without a stringer in the middle. There is very little flex with me bouncing on one bar and I'm 200 lbs. I will test with a couple people tomorrow when I finish it up. I am buying a carbide blade saw after this, finer wheels flex more than I like on the angled cuts even going slow.View attachment 7089021
Damn man, those came out great. Very clean job.

On the saw, are you looking to get a cutoff/chop saw or a metal-cutting circular saw?
 

Bradu

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Damn man, those came out great. Very clean job.

On the saw, are you looking to get a cutoff/chop saw or a metal-cutting circular saw?
Thanks, I'm pretty happy with it. The chop saw type with a carbide blade. I have the Milwaukee metal circular saw, bought it last year. It's what I used to cut the work bench top on the last project I posted. I love that tool.
 

bogeybrown

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Thanks, I'm pretty happy with it. The chop saw type with a carbide blade. I have the Milwaukee metal circular saw, bought it last year. It's what I used to cut the work bench top on the last project I posted. I love that tool.
I just bought the Milwaukee a few weeks ago and haven't had a chance to use it yet but I have high hopes. Right now I'm cutting sheets and plates with a Metabo, so it's got to beat that.

Our chop saw got stolen about 6 months ago, so pretty much all of my tubing, angle, etc is also done with a Metabo but I'm getting frustrated to the point of buying another cutoff saw myself. I've only used abrasive wheels in them though, I'll have to check out a carbide option.
 
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Geno C.

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The abrasive saws have their place, quick and dirty. Close enough kind of jobs.

I use a bandsaw for anything that needs to be pretty accurate to start with
 

mzvarner

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The name Harbor Freight sends chills down most spines. However their 4x6 horizontal metal band saw has a cult following. Just search the googles and you see what it can do. I have been super happy with mine with some variable tooth bi metal blades (get a few tho). Yes it will be slower, but slow is (more) precise, and clean.

But im a CICU nurse by trade and do metal fab as a hobby so my advice is worth a little less than you paid.
 

oneshot86

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yes, bandsaw...
most of my mobile cutting was done w a Milwaukee super porta bandsaw.
it is a must have for a welder, if it was too big for the porta band then i it w a 00 tip cutting torch...or stationary band saw in shop.
 

oneshot86

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The name Harbor Freight sends chills down most spines. However their 4x6 horizontal metal band saw has a cult following. Just search the googles and you see what it can do. I have been super happy with mine with some variable tooth bi metal blades (get a few tho). Yes it will be slower, but slow is (more) precise, and clean.

But im a CICU nurse by trade and do metal fab as a hobby so my advice is worth a little less than you paid.

thanks for bringing up variable TPI. i use a 10-14, and LOVE them.
 

Geno C.

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7091736We run a shop Fox. Same as harbor freight and grizzly. I can’t begin to imagine the number of cuts this thing has done in the last 8-10 years. The gear box came empty and the brass gear lasted a 10 hour day of straight cutting before it ate itself up 😂
 

mzvarner

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View attachment 7091736We run a shop Fox. Same as harbor freight and grizzly. I can’t begin to imagine the number of cuts this thing has done in the last 8-10 years. The gear box came empty and the brass gear lasted a 10 hour day of straight cutting before it ate itself up 😂
Thats 1 hell of a chunk of steel on that! Saddly my projects never require anything that massive.

From what i remember reading, the base model is from the same factory. The price varies on what brand is on it (then if you add hydraulics, feed, etc). I picked mine up on local craigslist for $100. You can get new with the 20% coupon and fathers day is comin up so im sure a sale is too.
 
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Bradu

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Bogey, I clamp a straight edge down most of the time and it makes a perfect cut with the circular saw. I want a Bailaigh cold cut saw but I have am waiting to see how the job goes since I've only been there a few weeks. Here is the saw I am looking a to get me by, it is either this one or the Fien slugger. I want a true cold cut saw because of how easy it is adjusting the saw to cut angles. Here is yesterday's project, a bumper for a machine that was hit by a drunk driver.


20190607_153537.jpg20190607_145209.jpg
 

DaveinCO

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Bogey, I clamp a straight edge down most of the time and it makes a perfect cut with the circular saw. I want a Bailaigh cold cut saw but I have am waiting to see how the job goes since I've only been there a few weeks. Here is the saw I am looking a to get me by, it is either this one or the Fien slugger. I want a true cold cut saw because of how easy it is adjusting the saw to cut angles. Here is yesterday's project, a bumper for a machine that was hit by a drunk driver.


View attachment 7091845View attachment 7091846
We ran a few of those for a while, they are better for some things than an abrasive saw, and more jobsite portable than a horizontal bandsaw. They come pretty rough from the factory, i ended up turning new bushings and pivot pins for both of the ones we bought. They will also eat blades like crazy if you are cutting angle or channel. You have to feed them super slow into any sharp edge or it will chip teeth off and trash the blade instantly.
If you have a shop there is no substitute for a good bandsaw. Keep an eye on craigslist, they come up for sale pretty often depending on how big a saw you need. If you can't dedicate the shop space for a permanant bandsaw like a Hyd-mech, take a look at the Ellis. They're sort of portable, only about $2500 new, and will will cut an 8" wide flange beam.
 
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bogeybrown

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We ran a few of those for a while, they are better for some things than an abrasive saw, and more jobsite portable than a horizontal bandsaw. They come pretty rough from the factory, i ended up turning new bushings and pivot pins for both of the ones we bought. They will also eat blades like crazy if you are cutting angle or channel. You have to feed them super slow into any sharp edge or it will chip teeth off and trash the blade instantly.
If you have a shop there is no substitute for a good bandsaw. Keep an eye on craigslist, they come up for sale pretty often depending on how big a saw you need. If you can't dedicate the shop space for a permanant bandsaw like a Hyd-mech, take a look at the Ellis. They're sort of portable, only about $2500 new, and will will cut an 8" wide flange beam.

Thanks for the pointers. Currently 100% of what I do is in the field. If I’m working off of sawhorses it’s a gravy job.

A big band saw would of course be great, but unfortunately not usable. I’ve literally spent 6- 8hrs out of a workday with a Metabo in my hand.
 

IowaPlinker

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So, my brother inherited our dads old stick welder. And now he wants to learn how to weld.
Any suggestions for the best place to learn? He is available evenings and weekends.
I suggested he contact the Local and see where the apprentices start.
Any other suggestions?
Currently he is a serious hobby woodworker. Furniture, mostly.
 

Bradu

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Check the local college or possibly welding supply stores, I believe the one local has mentioned they offer some training there. If there is nothing around, have him get on YouTube and watch welding tips and tricks channel. Start by padding beads on flat plate until they look good then move on to horizontally then vertical. As I've tried to explain to some people but none listen, don't waste metal trying to stick two pieces together until you can run decent beads. If you can't run a decent beads then I don't understand why people think they can magically lay down a good bead trying two plates together lol.
 

Sean the Nailer

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I've said it many times before. It takes 10 minutes to learn how to weld. It takes 10 years to get good at it.

Definitely, start with a Community College. They usually can do WONDERS for those interested in starting something. How far one goes, depends on the person's ambition.

Another good thing about the colleges, is that students can/will be using a different machine each time/day. This way, they can actually see/feel/learn/hear the differences in what they're doing. Broaden's ones horizons, right there.
 

Bradu

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Excellent point about the different welders, half the battle for a lot of people is setting a machine. I still fight one every now and again, the stick welder at work is one but I think it is the welder. One day I weld with the dial at 3 o clock position and the next time it won't strike an arc or keep it lit. It will have to be in the 7 o clock position with the same 3/32 rod. Weird thing is the 1/8" rod is about 9 o clock. It has no numbers left on the face of it, it's an old dial arc. I'm about to take my xmt 304 in there so I have enough power to use my air arc with a decent size rod. Fuck trying to torch welds out or use a cut off wheel.
 

Mike Casselton

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Excellent point about the different welders, half the battle for a lot of people is setting a machine. I still fight one every now and again, the stick welder at work is one but I think it is the welder. One day I weld with the dial at 3 o clock position and the next time it won't strike an arc or keep it lit. It will have to be in the 7 o clock position with the same 3/32 rod. Weird thing is the 1/8" rod is about 9 o clock. It has no numbers left on the face of it, it's an old dial arc. I'm about to take my xmt 304 in there so I have enough power to use my air arc with a decent size rod. Fuck trying to torch welds out or use a cut off wheel.
Just a guess here but I bet the rheostat needs cleaning.
It's like the volume knob on an old stereo. Some days 3 is loud, other days 8 isn't audible. That is, until you wiggle the knob.
 
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bourbonbent

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My fab work is now limited to making tooling for myself.

Stand for an old Peter Wright post leg vise:

E45AE0C0-D1A8-454F-A67B-BAB3A8E4407A.jpeg

Tripod anvil stand with a hammer rack on the far side (I forge horn to the right):

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73DED572-96D7-4169-B7F6-2622255F5D33.jpeg

Knife holding fixture, spring loaded with dowels, for drilling holes and doming pin heads, Starrett machinist jack for support:

4E477AC1-5920-45D9-B6C2-6416027FF802.jpeg
 

Geno C.

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7098495Cash wanted a “real” hammer like Thor has in the new movie. we discussed how heavy it would be if I built it to scale for his body. Took a trip the the hardware store to see what he really had in mind. He picked out a tiny hatchet and he explained the hammer head part that he wanted on the backside. This is where we’re at so far. He couldn’t wait much longer so he’s out smashin shit now.