The "Nom Nom Nom" Thread

1J04

Morale Officer
Aug 7, 2011
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Well, we just had some that we're "lost" in the bottom of the chest freezer in the garage, and the date was 12/xx/16. So, at least a year later and they were fine. I think a year is about the limit of what is recommended by the sealer, but we've had some go past 14 or 15 months, and they were also fine.

Edit: And this was all cased and/or linked sausage.
Same story damn near every year. Open the lid, dig around, then have that moment. "Huh?, What the hell is that?" Hmmm 2015. We've had plenty sit for 16 mos with no worries. But we didn't set out to hang on to it that long. Just happens, right?

Now what won't be sitting around, and not even for 16 days let alone mos are these tasty buggers that were waiting for me when I got home. :p I should have know once I mentioned I was ready to pull the trigger on some Philly Sammies that the "Cunning Linguist" would pull another of his shenanigans. ;) And he did. Veer, like I said on the phone last night on my maiden bluetooth call outta the awesome truck, THANK YOU and the Mrs. !!!!! A box of Sammies that's way more than that. What an incredible edible gesture. I'm bringing the 1st one to Stalag 17 next week to devour in front of my captive audience. Hell, I may just walk down the main corridor with it with my phone in my chest pocket recording audio to capture the results.:rolleyes: That'd be hilarious.

Thanks again my friend, and that you JIM !!!!! :p


 
Aug 21, 2012
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Chicagostan
Same story damn near every year. Open the lid, dig around, then have that moment. "Huh?, What the hell is that?" Hmmm 2015. We've had plenty sit for 16 mos with no worries. But we didn't set out to hang on to it that long. Just happens, right?

Now what won't be sitting around, and not even for 16 days let alone mos are these tasty buggers that were waiting for me when I got home. :p I should have know once I mentioned I was ready to pull the trigger on some Philly Sammies that the "Cunning Linguist" would pull another of his shenanigans. ;) And he did. Veer, like I said on the phone last night on my maiden bluetooth call outta the awesome truck, THANK YOU and the Mrs. !!!!! A box of Sammies that's way more than that. What an incredible edible gesture. I'm bringing the 1st one to Stalag 17 next week to devour in front of my captive audience. Hell, I may just walk down the main corridor with it with my phone in my chest pocket recording audio to capture the results.:rolleyes: That'd be hilarious.

Thanks again my friend, and that you JIM !!!!! :p
Damn, you got hooked the fuck up. What an amazing gesture on the part of Veer_G .

I was foraging last night, and momma asked for a sammich while I was in there. She wanted provolone on it and I didn't feel like turning on an appliance to melt it, so I did what any man would do: blowtorch it!

IMG_2135.JPG IMG_2136.JPG
 

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Nodakplowboy

Wood Butcher
Mar 4, 2017
475
474
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South Central North Dakota.
This last Friday evening The Child Bride and I were all cozy and warm watching a movie when out of the blue she says "We should make Kumla tomorrow". Great idea says I. Rise and shine Saturday AM with a feast on my mind only to discover we have no red potatoes, the main ingredient in kumla. It's -29 out there, no way am I going to start a vehicle for a trip to the store. So, with my stomach and love of my wife overruling common sense, I bundle up and make the trek on foot. Stop at the hardware store first (CCI Maxi Mags HP's on sale) then to the food store for 5# of reds. A long 1/2 mile loop, it was great, even meet a few other knucklehead walkers.

Historical footnote; Kumla is Norwegian soul food brought over by the first generation immigrants. To mention it in front of second generation Norsks (my in-laws) brings a smile to their faces and invokes memories of their childhood and hardscrabble upbringing. My third generation Child Bride remembers it as the main course (along with lutefisk) on Christmas Eve. Being mostly Kraut, I was a little leery of it at first, but over the years have learned to relish it.

Process. Peel spuds and drop into a bowl of cold water. Cube spuds, coarse grind into next bowl. Add milk, flour, salt and pat into baseball size portions affectionately called "balls". Bring large pasta pot to a rolling boil, gently drop in balls and boil for 60 minutes, stirring frequently. This is a good time to clean up the mess made during the prep. When the hour has passed, serve balls onto plate with a side of ham, slice and lather with melted butter, pepper according to taste. Consume in large quantities.

Shortly after one has eaten his fill of kumla, a strange thing happens. Your eyes get heavy, the system starts to slow down and you enter a state called kumlatose. The only cure is a nap. A long one.

Leftover kumla is best served sliced and fried in butter, served with maple syrup, like pancakes. On this morning's menu right after I get some vehicles started and warmed up. Still a little cool out there.
 

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Aug 21, 2012
3,480
811
113
Chicagostan
This last Friday evening The Child Bride and I were all cozy and warm watching a movie when out of the blue she says "We should make Kumla tomorrow". Great idea says I. Rise and shine Saturday AM with a feast on my mind only to discover we have no red potatoes, the main ingredient in kumla. It's -29 out there, no way am I going to start a vehicle for a trip to the store. So, with my stomach and love of my wife overruling common sense, I bundle up and make the trek on foot. Stop at the hardware store first (CCI Maxi Mags HP's on sale) then to the food store for 5# of reds. A long 1/2 mile loop, it was great, even meet a few other knucklehead walkers.

Historical footnote; Kumla is Norwegian soul food brought over by the first generation immigrants. To mention it in front of second generation Norsks (my in-laws) brings a smile to their faces and invokes memories of their childhood and hardscrabble upbringing. My third generation Child Bride remembers it as the main course (along with lutefisk) on Christmas Eve. Being mostly Kraut, I was a little leery of it at first, but over the years have learned to relish it.

Process. Peel spuds and drop into a bowl of cold water. Cube spuds, coarse grind into next bowl. Add milk, flour, salt and pat into baseball size portions affectionately called "balls". Bring large pasta pot to a rolling boil, gently drop in balls and boil for 60 minutes, stirring frequently. This is a good time to clean up the mess made during the prep. When the hour has passed, serve balls onto plate with a side of ham, slice and lather with melted butter, pepper according to taste. Consume in large quantities.

Shortly after one has eaten his fill of kumla, a strange thing happens. Your eyes get heavy, the system starts to slow down and you enter a state called kumlatose. The only cure is a nap. A long one.

Leftover kumla is best served sliced and fried in butter, served with maple syrup, like pancakes. On this morning's menu right after I get some vehicles started and warmed up. Still a little cool out there.
Very cool. I'm always happy to find a new means of eating way too many red potatoes.
 
Sep 7, 2011
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Golden CO
Well, a little late in posting. One, I have been busier than a 1 legged man since Christmas, 2 I had to figure out how to post pics. My GF and I had a couple days together the weekend of the 23rd and 24th of December as our kids were at their other parents. So I went off and made some food. Usually with 3 kids we are making stuff we all like and when they are gone its time for something a little more "grown up". I had queried Moses the Tank about a bottle of wine he had posted and the supplier I had found was out when I made it back to order. So I went with a bottle of something called Jacuzzi (forgive me for no pics of the bottle). Its from CA and supposedly a rarer grape in the states according to the bottle. Went well with the dinner and my GF asked that we could have it again when I make this again.
I seasoned them and set them in the fridge. I followed the rules and let them sit about 30-40 minutes to warm up. I seared them 2 minutes/side in a little EVOO and then in the oven at 450 for 4 minutes. Then over medium heat I melted in some butter and with fresh garlic and a splash of red wine. I basted it up a couple times and then removed from heat to let it rest. Goal was the upper end of mid rare and missed it by a bit. The little lady said she usually prefers where I was aimed and was amazed at how tender and warm it was for a red as it looked. She said if it was all like that, this would be fine all the time. Probably not always going to be top end tenderloins wrapped in bacon, unless my numbers come up this week.......



 
Feb 16, 2005
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VA
Here's one for you cold weather grillers.

After getting into the cooking I was glad I decided not to do the pork tenderloin and opted for some hamburgers.

Temps were low to mid teens with a pretty good wind blowing.Had all 4 burners going full out and grill wouldn't heat up over 400 on the grills built in thermometer.

How do you guys manage to cook in these conditions?
 
Jan 23, 2010
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Morley IA
Here's one for you cold weather grillers.

After getting into the cooking I was glad I decided not to do the pork tenderloin and opted for some hamburgers.

Temps were low to mid teens with a pretty good wind blowing.Had all 4 burners going full out and grill wouldn't heat up over 400 on the grills built in thermometer.

How do you guys manage to cook in these conditions?
I resort to using our Traeger in the barn. Keeps it and me out of the wind. Ran it tonight as it was 5 degrees out with wind.
 

Veer_G

Beware of the Dildópony!
Jun 15, 2008
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SEPA
I made it to the Holy of Holies today ...

[IMG2=JSON]{"data-align":"none","data-size":"full","height":"638","width":"850","src":"https:\/\/i.imgur.com\/4VWC2Sg.jpg?1"}[/IMG2]

[IMG2=JSON]{"data-align":"none","data-size":"full","height":"638","width":"850","src":"https:\/\/i.imgur.com\/iOakS8x.jpg?1"}[/IMG2]

The grill that's spawned decades of joy.

[IMG2=JSON]{"data-align":"none","data-size":"full","height":"1133","width":"850","src":"https:\/\/i.imgur.com\/TBIvha1.jpg?1"}[/IMG2]

"Double meat, provolone, with." The truck was pissed that it couldn't come inside. 16 ℉ today, before the wind chill. Stewart's Diet Root Beers.

[IMG2=JSON]{"data-align":"none","data-size":"full","height":"1133","width":"850","src":"https:\/\/i.imgur.com\/x0YrEE5.jpg?1"}[/IMG2]

Even something for the Princess.

[IMG2=JSON]{"data-align":"none","data-size":"full","height":"638","width":"850","src":"https:\/\/i.imgur.com\/KuU2PHH.jpg?1"}[/IMG2]

It was saying "Eat me," so I did.
 

1J04

Morale Officer
Aug 7, 2011
10,196
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PACIFIC NW
I can't imagine what the fresh ones must be like. The boys were home the other day. I think they're mad I haven't given them a sammy yet.:p
 

1J04

Morale Officer
Aug 7, 2011
10,196
7,458
113
PACIFIC NW
Enjoyed having my two Son's over last night for some Prime Cut TriTiip and snapping with oneshot and his mad house. Damn that was fun. That guy is something else. You can just tell he's solid people and encourages the mayhem with the kids. Thx Mike. Made my night.





 

Veer_G

Beware of the Dildópony!
Jun 15, 2008
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I'm still semi-laid up from some adventures in podiatry, so the missus has been doing the kitchen chores in my absence.

Today, she hit it out of the park.

Lunch, which I don;t have a picture of, was smørrebrød, of pumpernickel bread, butter, tomato, onion, sliced hard-boiled eggs, mustard herring, and capers.

Dinner, pictured above, was the most incredible beef stew I've ever had. The girl is definitely blossoming after two decades-plus of my masterful tutelage.

Here's the basic recipe: https://thespruce.com/oven-braised-beef-stew-recipe-995270

She used 7 oz. more meat, extra carrot and celery, bumped the dry herbs a bit, and threw in an extra cup of stock, tablespoon of tomato paste, and teaspoon of Worcestershire sauce.

And I got leftovers!
 

Veer_G

Beware of the Dildópony!
Jun 15, 2008
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That stew looks great. Is that pumpernickel with whipped butter on the edge of the bowl?
Hell, yes it is. She did the stew in my old Lodge cast iron combo: https://www.amazon.com/Lodge-LCC3-Cooker-Pre-Seasoned-3-2-Quart/dp/B0009JKG9M Cheap as shit, durable, and the stew *just* fit. As it was, I had to butcher the roast down to the recipe and used the "trimmings" for some sandwiches with sautéed onion, garlic, and shallots on crusty bread. The size is good for just the two of us. I should break down and buy about a 5-quart model or so to cook for the masses, but I tend to cook in small courses for company and don't do too many big-batch meals that really call for cast iron.
 
Likes: barneybdb
Jan 6, 2012
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Plain cast iron will last forever and cooks great, although it’s a little more difficult to get cleaned up. I wanted a nice, US made glazed iron Dutch oven. Someone gave me a nice (and stupid expensive) one; I used it twice before my wife dropped the lid, chipping the enamel. It’s nice, but won’t get passed down like the cast iron I have that was my great grandmothers before it was my grandmothers before it was mine. My mother makes cornbread in a pan that belonged to her great grandmother. No telling who in our family were the original purchasers.

Btw, that recipe was a little different. Most call for coating the beef with AP flour before browning. Some folks tend to get too much flour on the beef, making the stew too thick.
 

MarinePMI

Battery Operated Grunt
Jun 3, 2010
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San Diego, Ca
Hands down, one of the best beef stew recipes I've found (I use ground cloves instead of all spice, and add a little extra Worcestershire sauce than called for). I also add some frozen corn or peas for some added texture. Sometimes I'll add cubed yellow potatoes as well so that the leftovers don't need a bed of mashed tubers (which is how I serve it, when it comes of the stove the first time).

Old Time Beef Stew - Paula Deen
 
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Veer_G

Beware of the Dildópony!
Jun 15, 2008
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Plain cast iron will last forever and cooks great, although it’s a little more difficult to get cleaned up. I wanted a nice, US made glazed iron Dutch oven. Someone gave me a nice (and stupid expensive) one; I used it twice before my wife dropped the lid, chipping the enamel. It’s nice, but won’t get passed down like the cast iron I have that was my great grandmothers before it was my grandmothers before it was mine. My mother makes cornbread in a pan that belonged to her great grandmother. No telling who in our family were the original purchasers.

Btw, that recipe was a little different. Most call for coating the beef with AP flour before browning. Some folks tend to get too much flour on the beef, making the stew too thick.
I went through my hoity-hoity Le Creuset phase one wife ago, and I couldn't get her to keep metal off of the enamel. She beat the shit out of it like she meant to. Cast iron without frills is just less headaches if you don't mind the maintenance. And yes, the recipe is unusual in the way you roux it up, but the missus is shit scared of judgment calls on unspecified amounts, so an amount in total is just easier if I want to eat the same day. Plus, it involves less technique.

And yes, I'm the family conservator of passed-down cookware. My prized possession is my grandfather's graniteware chicken roaster.
 

Veer_G

Beware of the Dildópony!
Jun 15, 2008
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Did you ever watch a cooking video and just lose it at the numbnuttiness of it? Cut to the chase at about 9:30 and watch how unbalanced this shit is.

 

CMH

Gunny Sergeant
Dec 17, 2010
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Billings, MT
Hell, yes it is. She did the stew in my old Lodge cast iron combo: https://www.amazon.com/Lodge-LCC3-Cooker-Pre-Seasoned-3-2-Quart/dp/B0009JKG9M Cheap as shit, durable, and the stew *just* fit. As it was, I had to butcher the roast down to the recipe and used the "trimmings" for some sandwiches with sautéed onion, garlic, and shallots on crusty bread. The size is good for just the two of us. I should break down and buy about a 5-quart model or so to cook for the masses, but I tend to cook in small courses for company and don't do too many big-batch meals that really call for cast iron.
Pre-seasoned cast iron? Oh the humanity...
 
Aug 21, 2012
3,480
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Chicagostan
I would like to try my hand at some Jambalaya - anybody have a recipe or some advice? Bogey?
One of my absolute least favorite dishes to cook. But if someone else is making one I like a Cajun vs Creole version, which doesn't have the tomato base to it. I'd say start with Paul Prudhomme's recipe and play with it from there. The proteins and their amounts aren't real important, it's all about the liquid (stock) to rice ratio.

The last time I had to make Jambalaya it was for 500 people, and I haven't had a desire to make it since.
 
May 20, 2006
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Winnipeg, Mb.
My Lady asked, so she received. This was under the tree this past Christmas (14" CI Pan/skillet set) https://www.cabelas.ca/product/28025/cabelas-outfitter-series-cast-iron-deep-skillets
Yeah, things like this come 'pre-seasoned' as per the label, but with me and my OCD, I break out my carbide scraper and after I do my seasoning technique on it (all of our CI) it is as good as (I believe 'better') than any so-called teflon "non-stick" stuff out there.

This isn't exactly a 'Nom Nom' post, but it is in the makings of "For" a series of Nom Nom posts/topics/rants.....
Enjoy the ride.

Plus, she just received a few CI bread pans, that have been back-ordered since forever! She's doing it up big what with bread, banana bread, and now her latest interest which is "apple fritter bread".

And that shit's GOOD!
 

Veer_G

Beware of the Dildópony!
Jun 15, 2008
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Dinner tonight was something that I had been meaning to make for a while now, cazuela de pollo con fideos. I've gotten off the track of cooking Spanish, as in Spain, dishes lately, and I wanted some comfort food.

The dish is a cazuela, which technically means casserole, but not in the sense that you shove a bunch of layered shit in an ovenproof dish and bake at 350º until done.

The original cazuelas were terra-cotta pots, shallow and wide, with the low point at the center, to encourage liquids to pool there and do their part in cooking. Spanish cuisine doesn't generally use much water. Taking care of cazuelas is fussy. You have to cure them by presoaking overnight, immersed in water, rubbing them all around with garlic cloves, and then slowly boiling water from them on the stovetop. And you really need to use a diffuser to spread the heat around, lest you crack it, and don't heat it up without something in it. And God forbid you use anything but wooden spoons, and don't pull it hot off the stove and put it down on a cool surface. Despite the fussiness, they're great and can actually last a good long while if cared for. Historically, they were within the price range of the poorest of Spaniards, much cheaper than metallic implements.

Here's mine. It's still got garlic bits from being cured, and you can see a ding in it from years ago at 2 o'clock. It's close to 15" across and about 4.5" deep. The yellow is the sun streaming through the window.



An outfit called La Tienda ("The Store," how catchy) imports and retails them: https://www.tienda.com/products/terra-cotta-cazuela-15-inch-ca-10.html

Here's the ingredient list, followed by steps and photos.

32 oz. chicken stock
1 5 lb. chicken, cut down, or same approximate weight in halved chicken thighs
1 Italian green pepper, seeded, sliced in rounds and halved
2-3 large carrots, sliced in rounds
1 large onion, coarsely chopped
3-5 cloves of garlic, chopped
3 large, or 5 medium tomatoes, grated
100 grams peas (200 if not using beans)
100 grams Roma beans, trimmed, de-filamented, and rough-chopped
1 heaping tbsp. paprika
200 grams fideos (about 2/3 of a 12 0z. Goya bag)
2-3 bay leaves
EVOO
1 tbsp. salt (preferably kosher or sea)
1 tbsp. freshly ground black pepper
fresh parsley fine-chopped (garnish)

Vegetables/etc., pre-flight. I use frozen Romas and/or peas. The Romas do double duty in paellas.



EVOO in your cazuela. If you're without the cazuela, you can try this in a big-ass cast iron skillet of proper dimensions.



Set the cazuela on a burner with a good range, preferably on top of a heat diffusing plate. Think a skinnier, cheaper 12" AR500 gong.

Prep the chicken. Salt and pepper it well on all sides. I trim off excess skin and fat and reserve in the freezer.

If you feel confident, start your heat on the cazuela medium-high, and chop up your onion, garlic, pepper, and carrots. If your kitchen skills are less than fully developed, do up the vegetables and then start heating the oil.

With the oil good and hot, start the chicken skin-down. Keep the heat up on the chicken for as long as possible.



Garlic and onion go in first, then green pepper, then carrots. You should be at about 10 minutes in to the cooking process when the carrots go in.

Start to give everything a good mix, and keep it from sticking by stirring, or grabbing the cazuela and giving it a good shake.

Let it continue to cook for about another 10 minutes at a good clip, taking care to not let it stick.

In between stirs, grate the tomatoes into a bowl, holding them stem-side up. Pitch the skins, and if you're squeamish, run the tomato glop through a sieve to catch the seeds.



Get ready, and pitch the paprika into the center of the bubbling mass, taking care to dig it a hole first, and then follow immediately with the tomato, stirring everything in well.

Pre-tomato, you should look like this:



Lower your heat to below medium when the tomatoes go in. Continue stirring or shaking from time to time.

After another ten minutes, add peas/beans and bay leaf.

Add broth, raise temperature to about halfway between medium and high.



Look for the beginnings of a boil at the edges. Add in the fideos, taking care to submerge them. From the pack, they come out in little lariats of pasta. Break them up and disperse them as they soften in the cazuela.



Once the fideos are submerged, you're about ten minutes out. Get the crumb snatchers to set the table and don't forget good, crusty bread.

Plated:



The broth is mind-blowing, but the fideos in the leftovers will soon soak it up. Enjoy!
 
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1J04

Morale Officer
Aug 7, 2011
10,196
7,458
113
PACIFIC NW
It's a good thing that you like broccoli, puppy.


I do like broccoli. Fresh sweet peas outta the pod all by themselves, yum. Peas any other way? Nope. I 'hid' tons of them in my napkin growing up. The ones I couldn't hide and was told "you'll sit there till they're gone"? Well, hard headed me sat for hours at the table alone. Just me and my peas till the head of the household came along and shouted "BED" !!!! I joke with the Inmates on a damn near a daily basis when they got peas in the soup. "I don't wanna see one pea leftover in that bowl or on that plate". The regulars know where i'm coming from............:sneaky:
 
Likes: barneybdb
Feb 13, 2017
3,768
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Camano Island, Washington
I do like broccoli. Fresh sweet peas outta the pod all by themselves, yum. Peas any other way? Nope. I 'hid' tons of them in my napkin growing up. The ones I couldn't hide and was told "you'll sit there till they're gone"? Well, hard headed me sat for hours at the table alone. Just me and my peas till the head of the household came along and shouted "BED" !!!! I joke with the Inmates on a damn near a daily basis when they got peas in the soup. "I don't wanna see one pea leftover in that bowl or on that plate". The regulars know where i'm coming from............:sneaky:
SADIST🤪
 
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1J04

Morale Officer
Aug 7, 2011
10,196
7,458
113
PACIFIC NW
Eldest Son came over for din din last night and to do some school work n hang out. We Traeger'd up some thighs on the porch and watch the vehicles freeze. Huddled around the BBQ'er and drank nice cold beer for about 20 mins longer than we usually have to. Mr Nichols 7 spice n Johnny's Jamaica Me. It was worth it. :giggle:



1519059716171.png
 
Aug 21, 2012
3,480
811
113
Chicagostan
Eldest Son came over for din din last night and to do some school work n hang out. We Traeger'd up some thighs on the porch and watch the vehicles freeze. Huddled around the BBQ'er and drank nice cold beer for about 20 mins longer than we usually have to. Mr Nichols 7 spice n Johnny's Jamaica Me. It was worth it. :giggle:



View attachment 6875710
Damn bubba, those look fantastic.
 
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