The Madness Returns

Fig

Janitor of the Hide
Mar 15, 2018
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The Most Dangerous City in the USA
#1
One of the best 20,000 foot analyses of where we are I have ever read, largely because it mirrors my understanding and opinions almost exactly. Rarely can I find little to criticize in an article, but I've read this one twice and it's true (even the parts I don't like).

I don't get this magazine (online or otherwise), and I've never even heard of Barton Swaim, but I may get a subscription just based on this article.
The Weekly Standard Article
(I used to get TWS, and read excerpted articles all the time)
 

Peterpan

Sergeant of the Hide
Jul 20, 2018
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#4
There was a lot to that article. I want to start with teddy Kennedy was a real piece of sh it and I’m glad he is dead. Conservatives in office have no backbone. Antifa gets away with breaking stuff and causing problems eventually we are going to have to fight fire with fire. Things are not going to get better until a lot of people die, unfortunately. There is no common ground to be had with a liberal. No deal made with the devil is a good deal.
 
Aug 21, 2012
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#7
It is the antonym of exegesis. That word might be more familiar.
As it turns out, yes it is. I hadn't heard exegesis in many decades, but had never heard of eisegesis. I enjoy a writer who can seamlessly toss out a gem like that without pretension.

To his credit he also used traduce effectictively
 
Likes: Skookum
Jan 28, 2011
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GA
#10
Solid piece of writing. Mr Swaim gives clarity to the present through the lens of the past. Given the current bearing offered by the article my concern is on the path forward. I think the answer to that concern is in the one sentence in the article I take issue with, or at least the second half of it:

"Today’s liberals don’t much appreciate the Christian component of their inheritance, preferring to think of themselves exclusively as children of the Enlightenment"

With sensibilities born of the Enlightenment, the authors of America’s liberties were mostly close students of the natural sciences - Thomas Paine an engineer, Benjamin Rush a physician and chemist, Roger Sherman an astronomer, Thomas Jefferson an architect and agronomist. This is not the cue from which Bernie Sanders appears on stage.

What was temporarily left behind as our founders embarked for the coast of Virginia was the Globe Theatre on an embankment of the Thames. But history has caught up with us. If there is anything about the most visible of current American culture remotely resembling the Elightenment it is only that which stems from the Elizabethan imagination. The miracle of Obama, entering from stage left and taking the stance of a remarkably alert parrot for eight straight years, stems from Marlowe’s tragical Doctor Faustus through shared dreams of “profit and delight,/Of power, of honor, of omnipotence”. From the Hollywood hills and the banks sandwiched between the East and Hudson Rivers we have witnessed the rise of the metaphysical over the physical.

It has been a few generations since engineers and a national budget converged to focus on America's infrastructure. We have strayed and we can no longer afford it. Not monetarily, not culturally, not spiritually. We are quite near spent. And that, I think, is the goal of America's detractors. Many of whom are squatting in chambers on Capitol Hill.

If we do not take back out national inheritance we and future generations will be stripped of it. Trump, for all of his innumerable foibles, has at least given voice to a middle America left behind. Vote, speak your mind, donate to candidates (far and wide) who represent your interests, and buy more ammo.
 
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Skookum

Flattus Domini
May 6, 2017
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Your mom's
#11
Solid piece of writing. Mr Swaim gives clarity to the present through the lens of the past. Given the current bearing offered by the article my concern is on the path forward. I think the answer to that concern is in the one sentence in the article I take issue with, or at least the second half of it:

"Today’s liberals don’t much appreciate the Christian component of their inheritance, preferring to think of themselves exclusively as children of the Enlightenment"

With sensibilities born of the Enlightenment, the authors of America’s liberties were mostly close students of the natural sciences - Thomas Paine an engineer, Benjamin Rush a physician and chemist, Roger Sherman an astronomer, Thomas Jefferson an architect and agronomist. This is not the cue from which Bernie Sanders appears on stage.

What was temporarily left behind as our founders embarked for the coast of Virginia was the Globe Theatre on an embankment of the Thames. And history has caught up with us. If there is anything Elizabethan about American culture is only the Elizabethan imagination. The legend of Obama, entering from stage left and taking the stance of a remarkably alert parrot for eight straight years, stems from Marlowe’s tragical Doctor Faustus through shared dreams of “profit and delight,/Of power, of honor, of omnipotence”. We have witnessed the rise of the metaphysical over the physical.

It has been a few generations since engineers and a national budget converged to focus on America's infrastructure. We can no longer afford it. Not monetarily, not culturally, not spiritually. We are quite near spent. And that, I think, is the goal of America's detractors. Many of whom are squatting in chambers on Capitol Hill.

If we do not take back out national inheritance we and future generations will be stripped of it. Trump, for all of his innumerable foibles, has at least given voice to a middle America left behind. Vote, speak your mind, donate to candidates (far and wide) who represent your interests, and buy more ammo.
The Enlightenment, which came here from Europe, had a different effect on the colonies than it had in Europe. In Europe, intellectuallism and humanism supplanted the belief in God and God's laws much more overseas than it did here. Given that the United States was formed initially by groups who had a strong belief in God and were driven by thier desire to worship Him freely, that makes sense.

Also, at the same time the Enlightenment was happening in Europe, wide spread religious revival The Great Awakening was happening here. This also cushioned the blow of the Enlightenment when it arrived. The result here was that the colonies embraced the scientific discoveries and technological advances but chose to filter them through thier understanding of a gracious and rational Creator God who is the source of all knowledge and wisdom.

I think it is the European Enlightenment to which the author refers to...not the colonial version.
 
Jan 28, 2011
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#12
The Enlightenment, which came here from Europe, had a different effect on the colonies than it had in Europe. In Europe, intellectuallism and humanism supplanted the belief in God and God's laws much more overseas than it did here. Given that the United States was formed initially by groups who had a strong belief in God and were driven by thier desire to worship Him freely, that makes sense.

Also, at the same time the Enlightenment was happening in Europe, wide spread religious revival The Great Awakening was happening here. This also cushioned the blow of the Enlightenment when it arrived. The result here was that the colonies embraced the scientific discoveries and technological advances but chose to filter them through thier understanding of a gracious and rational Creator God who is the source of all knowledge and wisdom.

I think it is the European Enlightenment to which the author refers to...not the colonial version.
Acknowledging that I am giving you and history short shrift... I do not think they are inseparable. America was at a much earlier stage of development and large cosmopolitan cities on the scale of London, Paris, etc. were many decades away. Paine, Franklin, and many others to include a stream of immigrants kept the link with Europe quite alive.

As the biological maxim goes, ontogeny recapitulates phylogeny, I think the same is true of cultures. It was a matter of time before we caught up and suffered the same woes. We are there, and have been for some time. Europe continues to exist as it is because of America. There is no one to look after us, however. Except us.
 

Skookum

Flattus Domini
May 6, 2017
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Your mom's
#13
Acknowledging that I am giving you and history short shrift... I do not think they are inseparable. America was at a much earlier stage of development and large cosmopolitan cities on the scale of London, Paris, etc. were many decades away. Paine, Franklin, and many others to include a stream of immigrants kept the link with Europe quite alive.

As the biological maxim goes, ontogeny recapitulates phylogeny, I think the same is true of cultures. It was a matter of time before we caught up and suffered the same woes. We are there, and have been for some time. Europe continues to exist as it is because of America. There is no one to look after us, however. Except us.
It is very true that an agrarian society tends to be less intellectual and humanistic than an industrial society. Growing up on a farm myself, I know that the realities of life were omnipresent and often exigent. There was never much room for theoretical musings about how we wished things to be.

And you are right, for 242 years we have been the brilliant "city on the hill", but that light is fading fast, and there is none to replace it. This nation has been an anomaly on the world stage. It was a good run, but I fear the darkness encroaching.
 

Fig

Janitor of the Hide
Mar 15, 2018
2,215
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The Most Dangerous City in the USA
#15
Well, I'm enjoying the twilight, and not gona stress about what comes after. I'm prepared for the coming night. So much more than the aggressors it's comical.
The only ammo I've bought in the last fifteen years is defensive stuff for my carry pistols, but the APF (Ammunition Production Facility) has enough resources for a protracted conflict.
 

Nik H

Constantly Learning
Jan 22, 2014
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Rhode Island
#16
The only ammo I've bought in the last fifteen years is defensive stuff for my carry pistols, but the APF (Ammunition Production Facility) has enough resources for a protracted conflict.
I keep saying I have to start reloading....I would rather store components than complete ammo which is what I do now.
 

Nodakplowboy

Wood Butcher
Mar 4, 2017
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South Central North Dakota.
#17
I keep saying I have to start reloading....I would rather store components than complete ammo which is what I do now.
PA240323.JPG

About 2/3's inventory of powder and bullets. Primers in several large MTM ammo boxes.

Better get started. This stuff ain't getting cheaper and I've seen 3 major component shortages in the last 25 years, next one could be right around the corner. Remember .22 rimfire?
 

Skookum

Flattus Domini
May 6, 2017
1,013
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Your mom's
#20
@Nodakplowboy

I remember .22 rimfire.

The only issue I have with reloading is that I am rather OCD and will drive myself crazy chasing the perfect round
So your current solution is to shoot store bought imperfect rounds? 😂

Just poking you a bit. 😁 I would encourage you to start reloading. It can be frustrating, but a lot of that is just failing to recognize trends and going too far down rabbit holes. The nodes that are the hardest to find are fickle bitches anyway. Good combos tune up fairly quickly.
 
Likes: Nik H

Rthur

Philomath
Apr 16, 2010
6,484
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Divernon, Illinios
#21
So your current solution is to shoot store bought imperfect rounds? 😂

Just poking you a bit. 😁 I would encourage you to start reloading. It can be frustrating, but a lot of that is just failing to recognize trends and going too far down rabbit holes. The nodes that are the hardest to find are fickle bitches anyway. Good combos tune up fairly quickly.
Lol...
Just run that factory ammo over a good chrono.
SD's need to be in the single digits....Lol

R
 

Nodakplowboy

Wood Butcher
Mar 4, 2017
439
430
63
South Central North Dakota.
#22
@Nodakplowboy

I remember .22 rimfire.

The only issue I have with reloading is that I am rather OCD and will drive myself crazy chasing the perfect round
I started with a 22-250, which is pretty easy to find a good load for. Start with something that is proven to have a track record of accuracy, like a 223, 308, 22-250, etc. Same with components, proven names. Find a good 100 yd load and shoot it until you get bored, then start stretching out the range. With all the information floating around on the web these days, load development is way easier than even 10 years ago.

Trust me you'll like the results.

Added edit: You have a AI, right? Load for that, life will be even simpler.
 
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Mooncake

Sergeant of the Hide
May 29, 2018
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Central Mountains, CO
#23
So many pessimists here in the bear pit. Trump was elected because of his message despite being Trump. And he keeps winning. The evil is at the height of its power and lost, despite a deeply flawed opponent.

That gives me tremendous hope, and yes I selected tremendous because of its Trumpiness and usurped hope because fuck that Kenyan.
 
Feb 13, 2017
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#24
View attachment 6960436

About 2/3's inventory of powder and bullets. Primers in several large MTM ammo boxes.

Better get started. This stuff ain't getting cheaper and I've seen 3 major component shortages in the last 25 years, next one could be right around the corner. Remember .22 rimfire?
Agreed, there isn’t a better time than now to load up. The tables could be turned in a couple of weeks and I think ammo prices will turn in a significantly northern direction if that happens. If the Red wave does come through, I think ammo prices can’t go much lower.