The Art Thread

Strykervet

Resident Phoenix Eye and Dim Mak Instructor
Jun 5, 2011
3,092
1,255
113
42
Pierce County, WA
#1
So this is a thread for artistically talented members to show off any of their works, and if not talented, feel free to post your favorite painting or sculpture or what have you. I'm leaving them as thumbnails because they're pretty large, so click on 'em to see it better. I also apologize for the camera, I'm not that skilled with it and paintings reflect a lot of light. I put 'em under a skylight and used the flash such that it wouldn't glare too bad to try to get the best color but it still doesn't do it justice. I have others but these are the ones that were handy. All but two were done when I was younger.

I'll go first. I was always into drawing and got in to oils at ~15 or 16. The "Young Sitting Bull" was the first painting I ever executed. I'd messed around to get a feel for them but this was the first serious composition. I believe my mother has the drawing that goes with it (I always do a detailed pencil drawing prior to the painting). It's on gesso'd carboard glued to pressure board (not the best support). It took me a few months to do this one, April to June IIRC.
IMG_0942.JPG
Then when I went back home a year or so later I did "Okra". My grandmother had some dried okra hanging on an old, nicotine stained wall. I saw it and it made me cry a bit because I realized for the first time she wasn't gonna be around much longer. So it's sort of a tribute to her, kind of a portrait in the abstract sense if you will. She was a very kind but rugged and tough woman. Can't explain why I saw that in the okra, but I did. In this case, I have both the original drawing I did prior and the painting I executed after.
IMG_0943.JPG
This one is a set of 3 smaller works. The head is a copy of the drawing in "Gray's Anatomy" I did for a study in ink and ink wash; the mail box is sort of what our mailbox in NE looked like at the time and was also a small study; these two were done in the early 90's in NE. Finally, "Iris" which is just a small painting of a photo I found online. I really liked the color and the black background that made it stand out. It's my favorite flower, they come in a myriad of colors and my grandmother grew them. "Iris" was done maybe 9 years ago or so.
IMG_0948.JPG
The last one is one I've been working on, off and on, for the last few years. I'm not in a rush to finish it but it's nearly done. I only work on it when I really feel it. So after the next few glazes and the rest of the detail work on the face, it'll be finished and ready to varnish. It's oils on a canvas board. I wish I'd used a stretched linen, but oh well. This is Vermeer's "Lacemaker". I figured if was ever to have one hang on my wall, I'd have to do it myself.
IMG_0940.JPG
The next one I plan on doing is 16x20 copy of Vermeer's "Girl with a Pearl Earring". I've already got the linen prepped, stretched and gridded. I do it the old fashioned way with rabbit skin glue sizing, lead white oil ground, heavy stretcher bars and copper tacks. They sure don't make 'em like that anymore.

I've got a good deal of linen and some prepared gesso boards done the old fashioned way, and I also plan on doing a painting of the picture in my avatar. It's Mt. Rainier with a farm in the foreground. I figure after I move I'll be able to do a lot more, but I've got time on my hands and when I can't do anything due to back, feet or knees, I can paint. It's also calming. Because oils take so long to dry, I can also do multiple works simultaneously and that also keeps it from getting too pedantic or boring.

Anybody else copy famous works? It's obvious I'm a Vermeer fanboy. I travelled to Holland just to see his paintings up close.
 

Sieg

Sergeant of the Hide
Jun 14, 2018
430
742
93
#7
A friend has a performance engine machine shop and dyno center, I frequently raid his recycle bins for parts to fab misc. stuff with.

This is a handle I made for the shops beer fridge.



The mother in law loves cowboy art, here's a couple pieces I made for her.





Candle piece for my mother.

 
Dec 28, 2017
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#12
The Library asked "Dr. Seuss book shelf?"

I said "Sure - no problem."

DSCN1275.jpg


The Chamber of Commerce wanted a new chair for Santa in his cabin. (You know the guy has to be comfortable, right?)

DSCN1813.jpg


A couple of guys asked me to organize an Honor Flight. They paid for it completely by themselves. I have wonderful memories of it - and now they have something to remember it also. The father of one landed behind the lines at Normandy on D-Day. He put his father's medals inside of the one he received.

DSCN1610.jpg
 
Feb 13, 2017
3,722
4,137
113
Camano Island, Washington
#14
The Library asked "Dr. Seuss book shelf?"

I said "Sure - no problem."

View attachment 6953630


The Chamber of Commerce wanted a new chair for Santa in his cabin. (You know the guy has to be comfortable, right?)

View attachment 6953640


A couple of guys asked me to organize an Honor Flight. They paid for it completely by themselves. I have wonderful memories of it - and now they have something to remember it also. The father of one landed behind the lines at Normandy on D-Day. He put his father's medals inside of the one he received.

View attachment 6953646
Stunning !!!........ (y)(y)(y)(y)(y)
 
Oct 8, 2014
836
2,251
93
Shreveport, Louisiana
#19

Strykervet

Resident Phoenix Eye and Dim Mak Instructor
Jun 5, 2011
3,092
1,255
113
42
Pierce County, WA
#20
Man, you guys set the bar high, huh? All of that is some AMAZING work! That pencil drawing was executed very well. The safe, just no words, didn't expect to see that. I think it would look slick as a movie prop or part of a museum even --I almost thought you veneered a old style safe until I saw the inside... Wow. The metal sculpture, the awesome bookshelf (I'd like one of those too!) and the cannon. The photos were really nice, I bet my sister wishes hers turned out like that. The cannon, damn. Looks like new issue! That could easily be a prop or museum piece too. All amazing.

NO short of talent on the 'Hide!
 

truth

pewpewpew
Sep 19, 2009
423
101
28
Seabeck, WA
#21
Nice work! I just saw your White Rim trip, I have not been on that trail yet but I plan to in the spring. I love wheeling in Moab.
Take 3 days. Plan the trip around the availability of White Crack and Murphy's campsite reservations. Do not miss sleeping at those two spots.

I spent the solar eclipse alone at White Crack. It was one of the most sublime things I've ever experienced.
 

Strykervet

Resident Phoenix Eye and Dim Mak Instructor
Jun 5, 2011
3,092
1,255
113
42
Pierce County, WA
#25
That's really great, but isn't the Sistine in basically an old empty building? It's why the pope wanted the ceiling painted, so it wouldn't look so plain. It's the canted one in the back of most pictures, just a rectangle with a roof. That looks like the Basilica of St. Peter, which was originally designed by Cellini I think, but executed by Michelangelo (other architects followed over a century but it was his vision I think that was carried out).

Either way, that's some amazing woodwork. I bet you'd get a kick of the dollhouse exhibit at the Historich Museum in Amsterdam. They aren't your usual dollhouses! Really, anybody that works in wood or silver owes it to themselves to go to Amsterdam. Word just don't cut it.
 
Dec 28, 2017
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#26
That's really great, but isn't the Sistine in basically an old empty building? It's why the pope wanted the ceiling painted, so it wouldn't look so plain. It's the canted one in the back of most pictures, just a rectangle with a roof. That looks like the Basilica of St. Peter, which was originally designed by Cellini I think, but executed by Michelangelo (other architects followed over a century but it was his vision I think that was carried out).

Either way, that's some amazing woodwork. I bet you'd get a kick of the dollhouse exhibit at the Historich Museum in Amsterdam. They aren't your usual dollhouses! Really, anybody that works in wood or silver owes it to themselves to go to Amsterdam. Word just don't cut it.
You could be right. It might have been the Basilica of St. Peter.

I don't think the real one looks like my version. They probably didn't use walnut either.

Thanks for the compliment.

We have a fairly extensive dollhouse exhibit at the Iowa state fair every year. I think "I could do that sometime", but it never seems to work out - plus what would I do with a really nice dollhouse?
 
Likes: 1J04

Strykervet

Resident Phoenix Eye and Dim Mak Instructor
Jun 5, 2011
3,092
1,255
113
42
Pierce County, WA
#32
You could be right. It might have been the Basilica of St. Peter.

I don't think the real one looks like my version. They probably didn't use walnut either.

Thanks for the compliment.

We have a fairly extensive dollhouse exhibit at the Iowa state fair every year. I think "I could do that sometime", but it never seems to work out - plus what would I do with a really nice dollhouse?
I haven't seen those, but the ones I'm talking about are famous. This one Dutch princess got one every year for her birthday for years. One is a scale replica of the palace. Most would be too big to setup in my living room to play with. Some may fit though. They're huge. And very elaborate. I also saw armoire's, desks, other furniture, that were absolute works of art. One piece had 12" wide (or bigger) spiral carved ebony pillars, and another piece had all these game animals hanging upside down (which in art of the time was a sexual statement) and was exquisitely carved. Some took masters and their shops years and years to complete.

Then the stuff they do in silver... I don't know how they do it, it looks carved but polished. Very fine detail. A large platter may have 100lbs. of silver in the center to form a silver cornucopia or pile of silver fruit or a mythical vignette.

Oh, and yeah, that's St. Peter's Basilica I'm pretty sure (I studied Roman art history at university as part of my basketweaving). Sistine is an empty building with a massive ceiling fresco done by Michelangelo. It's otherwise a boring rectangle building. So doing what you did took a lot more work and looks really cool because you had to scale it down and give the "essence" rather than the façade. A combination of internal and external components. Awesome. Did you see the wooden safe above? That's pretty awesome too.
 
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Dec 28, 2017
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#33
I haven't seen those, but the ones I'm talking about are famous. This one Dutch princess got one every year for her birthday for years. One is a scale replica of the palace. Most would be too big to setup in my living room to play with. Some may fit though. They're huge. And very elaborate. I also saw armoire's, desks, other furniture, that were absolute works of art. One piece had 12" wide (or bigger) spiral carved ebony pillars, and another piece had all these game animals hanging upside down (which in art of the time was a sexual statement) and was exquisitely carved. Some took masters and their shops years and years to complete.

Then the stuff they do in silver... I don't know how they do it, it looks carved but polished. Very fine detail. A large platter may have 100lbs. of silver in the center to form a silver cornucopia or pile of silver fruit or a mythical vignette.

Oh, and yeah, that's St. Peter's Basilica I'm pretty sure (I studied Roman art history at university as part of my basketweaving). Sistine is an empty building with a massive ceiling fresco done by Michelangelo. It's otherwise a boring rectangle building. So doing what you did took a lot more work and looks really cool because you had to scale it down and give the "essence" rather than the façade. A combination of internal and external components. Awesome. Did you see the wooden safe above? That's pretty awesome too.
The biggest problem I had with the desk was trying to figure out how to make the dome with the columns and brass bands and the light inside. The larger columns at the front required me to make a "fixture" (tool?) to flute them on my lathe. I wanted to put stained glass in the doors, but he did not want that.

I have a little bit of a "fetish" with locks and safes. Believe it or not I actually have a small safe collection. The wooden one is patterned off of another one I have. The combination lock actually works, but I did have to make some design modifications. Combination lock parts made from wood don't work quite as well as those made from brass. Just to be on the - ummmm . . . - safe side - I installed the back with screws so I can get inside if the lock decides to stop working.

I have two more pieces - a "Marble Machine" and a "Time Machine". I will probably post them after I finish using a jackhammer on a concrete floor this afternoon / tonight. Of course, that is assuming I can still even move my fingers to type.
 
Dec 28, 2017
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162
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#34
My wife is a retired Kindergarten teacher.

Of course, she used to teach her students the alphabet - one letter per day starting with the letter "A" on day one.

I thought it would be neat to build a marble machine for her students. I wanted it to be "big" so as to impress the kids with its size and "awesomeness". I wanted it to function with out them having to actually handle the marbles. I did not want there to be an opportunity for some of the marbles to get lost. Finally, it needed to contain certain features in it - namely a spiral, a xylophone, and a "rickety rack" (back and forth as the marbles descend).

First I built the structure for the size. Marble machines work on potential energy. What can it accomplish before it reaches the bottom? It has to have some height to be able to store the energy. Obviously, to get the marble to the height, it needs a method to lift it. I searched for "marble pump" on the internet. No, really, you can find them there. I built the pump. It requires a handle to turn and operate the pump. That means the center of the pump has to be some distance from the actual bottom of the structure. I loose some of the designed height and am left with a higher center of gravity. It could be a tipping hazard. Not good with young children because you know they are going to want to climb on it. My solution was to put a support under the pan that feeds the pump. The support is a box with glass windows. It is full of marbles and has a clear tube. At first glance, it appears the marbles in the box are what the pump is moving into the machine. They are not, but it looks that way. The box of marbles weighs more than 25 pounds. That significantly helps with the center of gravity and tipping problem.

Anyway the pump lifts two marble per revolution of the handle into a tube. It is the dark walnut structure in the center of the machine. This tube is full of marbles - about 75. When the two in the bottom are pushed into the tube, it pushes out two at the top. Those two fall into a square funnel with three holes in the bottom. The hole they fall into determines the "circuit" the marble follows: the rickety rack on the back, the spiral with xylophone in the middle and the bells and spinning wheel on the side and front. When the marble has completed the circuit, it lands in the pan and gets fed back into the pump.

Simple, right?

Anyway I present to you "Milton the Marvelous Marble Machine". He would go to school on the letter "M" day and stay all year. He would come home for the Summer and then return to school in the Fall.

I have had to rebuild him two times. The first time they just wore out the pump. I replaced the wood ebony bearings with ball bearings. The second time they broke the handle. I fixed it and my wife "talked" to her students.

Milton now spends his retired years sitting in the front entry of our house.

DSCN0816.jpg

DSCN0818.jpg
 

Vodoun daVinci

Sergeant of the Hide
Dec 17, 2017
270
128
43
#38
I used to make "Japanese" style cutlery....Taught Kenjutsu and made blades, hardware, and mounts for test cutting and all that.This was my Art.

SpiritResidence.jpg

Blade by Randal Graham. My mount, my pix, my polish...all of the woodwork, handle, blade collar (habaki), steel handle hardware...all of it I made from scratch.

Back "in the day" before I worked for food and health insurance. Like 2007. Now I take anti depressants because nobody fucking cares about art anymore - we all just work for food.

VooDoo
 
May 20, 2006
2,172
1,366
113
Winnipeg, Mb.
#39
I hear you when you say 'nobody cares about art anymore', though there are actually a few. Nowhere near enough, but a few. And those few DO appreciate it. Those 'signs' I made above, the only things I didn't make were the glass panes and the frames for the glass. All other metal "bits'n'bobs" I did. There are similar lamps like that for sale, especially in Louisiana. But I don't have the hundreds of dollars that they want for one, so I made it.

Helps to have a friend with a laser for the wood though, too.

But the average citizen, the don't know that 'hands' are capable of doing anything more than driving "thumb-things" anymore.
 

MarinePMI

Battery Operated Grunt
Jun 3, 2010
2,957
1,427
113
San Diego, Ca
#41
Well, it's been a few years, but here is some artwork I have dabbled in (Cut coin and chainmaille jewelry).
A 6-1 English maille weave
6-1 English Weave.jpg

A Celtic Helm's chain, adorned with a Byzantine weave along the edges (gold and argentium silver)
Celtic Helm and Byz weave.jpg

A Barbados Nickel (the wife likes lighthouses)
Barbados Nickel.jpg

A barrel weave chain
Barrel Weave.jpg

A Dragonscale collar (over 3000 argentium silver rings, a major PITA to finish)
Dragonscalle collar 1.jpg

A Panama Quarter. This ended up silver plated and on a pocket watch chain.
Panamanian Quarter.jpg

A Rosary (Gold and Argentium Silver rings). A butt load of mobius "rosettes", connected together.
Rosary.jpg

My eyes really limit what I can do these days, even with a magnavisor.
 

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Vodoun daVinci

Sergeant of the Hide
Dec 17, 2017
270
128
43
#45
I hear you when you say 'nobody cares about art anymore', though there are actually a few. Nowhere near enough, but a few. And those few DO appreciate it. Those 'signs' I made above, the only things I didn't make were the glass panes and the frames for the glass. All other metal "bits'n'bobs" I did. There are similar lamps like that for sale, especially in Louisiana. But I don't have the hundreds of dollars that they want for one, so I made it.

Helps to have a friend with a laser for the wood though, too.

But the average citizen, the don't know that 'hands' are capable of doing anything more than driving "thumb-things" anymore.
Yeah, my bad....when I say "nobody" I realize there are quite a few who still appreciate fine things and art but I'm bitter. Typical Artist.

hardware.jpg

Back in Summer 2007 I was making $1000 a week sitting in my basement workshop turning out art grade knives and swords that were more than just beautiful - they could be used hard and often and still be ppassed down as heirlooms. Then the economy hit the shitter, never to fully recover. At least not for what I do. I attended a few higher end cutlery shows and was perturbed by the number of guys who'd look at a $1000 one-off custom tanto and tell me they could buy something just like it in stainless with a cast dragon guard for $49 so where did I get off asking $1000 for something hand made that took a month to finish?

WaKnifeCombo.jpg

Hard to let it go but it's gone - never to return. Still I have some beautiful stuff and the skills transfer to other jobs that make money and keep me fed. Just bitter that something so cool and satisfying is no longer relevant /useful.

VooDoo
 
May 20, 2006
2,172
1,366
113
Winnipeg, Mb.
#46
Oh, believe me, the skills and talent ARE relevant and useful. It's just that the masses are too ignorant to know how (not smart) they are. That, and their 'instant gratification' and satisfaction with chinese knock-off's makes them think that they've 'just as much pride as the next guy.'

Quality vs. quantity. I'm sure there are some circles where folded blades are still appreciated. I know I've wanted one for years, but I ALSO know that it's not in my near future. I sharpen knives, here. For myself, and numerous around me. You though, you don't 'sharpen' edges as I do. You have a whole polishing process that is incomparable to the menial task I perform.

As to the chain-mail and cut-coins above, that too is impressive work. I made a copper-ring bracelet about 35 years ago, with the thought of "one day, I'm going to do this same thing out of gold, and solder each ring" so that it is stronger and much less risk of losing it.

That too is still on the "one-day-I'm-gonna..." list.
 

oneshot86

Full Member
Jul 13, 2001
5,160
1,841
113
citrus park ,fl
#47
Well, it's been a few years, but here is some artwork I have dabbled in (Cut coin and chainmaille jewelry).
A 6-1 English maille weave
View attachment 6979426

A Celtic Helm's chain, adorned with a Byzantine weave along the edges (gold and argentium silver)
View attachment 6979422

A Barbados Nickel (the wife likes lighthouses)
View attachment 6979427

A barrel weave chain
View attachment 6979428

A Dragonscale collar (over 3000 argentium silver rings, a major PITA to finish)
View attachment 6979423

A Panama Quarter. This ended up silver plated and on a pocket watch chain.
View attachment 6979424

A Rosary (Gold and Argentium Silver rings). A butt load of mobius "rosettes", connected together.
View attachment 6979425

My eyes really limited what I can do these days, even with a magnavisor.

fuckin damn
good job
 

MarinePMI

Battery Operated Grunt
Jun 3, 2010
2,957
1,427
113
San Diego, Ca
#48
Never thought/knew of chainmaille as art but those are incredible.

R
Chain maille as an art form has come a long way in the past 10 years or so, mainly due to the internet and shows like Game of Thrones, Harry Potter and other historical/fantasy movies. Heck, I catch the female talking heads on the News wearing the stuff a lot. Add to this the technology behind it, and it has literally exploded in popularity. Between the math behind it (Aspect ratio of the rings is a mathematical formula, with different weaves requiring different AR's; so it can be scaled up/down in size; AR=ID/wire diameter), and the addition of exotic metals (like niobium, titainium, enameled copper and anodized aluminum) it has become an artform that even those with the most meager incomes can delve into, before dropping several hundred dollars in precious metals for some capstone project. The addition of color has also led way to some making sheets of mail, with logos or pictures woven as part of the maille.

Hell, the recent lander on Mars has a chain maille skirt with scale mail (those tear dropped plates that are woven together) from one of the original pioneers in the art form (The Ring Lord, up in Canada).

I'll have to root around and see if I have any photos of some of the Japanese weaves I've done (very small, very tedious and very distinct from traditional Persian or English weaves). Just about every culture had some form of chain maille, but used it differently. For Europeans it was often used as an under garment of protection, for the Persians it was often used as connectors (chains), and for the Japanese it was used to join the bamboo armor pieces together (flat, silky feeling weaves, used in the armpits, wrists and exposed rib joints).

Merging all of these different weaves from across the cultures, and time periods, has really enabled some of the weaves you see above. If nothing else, it is an interesting lesson in history, while also learning an art form.

It's come a long way from wrapping wire around a round dowel, and snipping the coils into individual rings...

Edit: Here's a picture of a Japanese weave I have done (this is someone else's work, but it was the exact same bracelet)
Japanese 12-2.jpg

As an aside, I got into this when dealing with some issues (some would call it PTSD, I just called it dealing bad memories and regrets), and I found that the required focus, repetitiveness and the reward of having something tangible at the end, that you could hold in your hands, very beneficial. Plus, if you do it enough (like morse code) you see the patterns in your sleep (seeing patterns in your sleep=no bad dreams). Way more practical and healthy, than smoking dope because the VA says you can have a prescription (fuck that).

I often wonder if learning the patterns were a way of reprogramming the brain (some of the weaves can be a real bitch to understand at first, so it tweaks your spatial thinking quite a bit to get it), and it thereby disrupted other (not so healthy) thought patterns. Meh, who knows. It seemed to help a lot though.
 
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SilentStalkr

Wonna Be Badass
Oct 8, 2012
946
439
63
38
Somewhere in the US
#50
Tig Practice, Flower. Made in my youth.

View attachment 6953511
Fantastic use of a valve stem!!!
Number 3 kid

is currently working on this one:
View attachment 6953555

R
This is awesome. Kid #3 is talented. I used to do drawing years ago.

The Library asked "Dr. Seuss book shelf?"

I said "Sure - no problem."

View attachment 6953630


The Chamber of Commerce wanted a new chair for Santa in his cabin. (You know the guy has to be comfortable, right?)

View attachment 6953640


A couple of guys asked me to organize an Honor Flight. They paid for it completely by themselves. I have wonderful memories of it - and now they have something to remember it also. The father of one landed behind the lines at Normandy on D-Day. He put his father's medals inside of the one he received.

View attachment 6953646
These are fantastic! How did you bend the wood for the Dr. Seuss shelf?

I used to make "Japanese" style cutlery....Taught Kenjutsu and made blades, hardware, and mounts for test cutting and all that.This was my Art.

View attachment 6979229

Blade by Randal Graham. My mount, my pix, my polish...all of the woodwork, handle, blade collar (habaki), steel handle hardware...all of it I made from scratch.

Back "in the day" before I worked for food and health insurance. Like 2007. Now I take anti depressants because nobody fucking cares about art anymore - we all just work for food.

VooDoo
Wow! That’s bad ass. It’s been a dream of mine since I was a kid to travel to Japan and make one of these with one of the old swordsmiths! Maybe one day! Have you ever watched Forged In Fire? One of my fave shows when I have time to watch.