Suicide up 38-58% in some states.

Aug 24, 2010
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Pardon the copy-paste formatting, I don't feel like fixing it all.

https://www.washingtonpost.com/news...ntry-new-report-shows/?utm_term=.d62c10917a4f

Suicide rates rise sharply across the United States, new report shows




By Amy Ellis NuttJune 7 at 3:57 PMEmail the author

The federal Centers for Disease Control and Prevention in Atlanta. (David Goldman/AP)
This post has been updated.
Suicide rates rose in all but one state between 1999 and 2016, with increases seen across age, gender, race and ethnicity, according to a report released Thursday by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. In more than half of all deaths in 27 states, the people had no known mental health condition when they ended their lives.
In North Dakota, the rate jumped more than 57 percent. In the most recent period studied (2014 to 2016), the rate was highest in Montana, at 29.2 per 100,000 residents, compared with the national average of 13.4 per 100,000.
[Suicide rates are on the rise across the nation but nowhere more so than in rural counties]
Only Nevada recorded a decline — of 1 percent — for the overall period, although its rate remained higher than the national average.
Increasingly, suicide is being viewed not only as a mental health problem but a public health one. Nearly 45,000 suicides occurred in the United States in 2016 — more than twice the number of homicides — making it the 10th-leading cause of death. Among people ages 15 to 34, suicide is the second-leading cause of death.
The most common method used across all groups was firearms.
“The data are disturbing,” said Anne Schuchat, the CDC's principal deputy director. “The widespread nature of the increase, in every state but one, really suggests that this is a national problem hitting most communities.”
It is hitting many places especially hard. In half of the states, suicide among people age 10 and older increased more than 30 percent.

Percent change in annual suicide rate* by state, from 1999-2001 to 2014-2016 (Centers for Disease Control and Prevention)
“At what point is it a crisis?” asked Nadine Kaslow, a past president of the American Psychological Association. “Suicide is a public health crisis when you look at the numbers, and they keep going up. It’s up everywhere. And we know that the rates are actually higher than what’s reported. But homicides still get more attention.”
One factor in the rising rate, say mental health professionals as well as economists, sociologists and epidemiologists, is the Great Recession that hit 10 years ago. A 2017 study in the journal Social Science and Medicine showed evidence that a rise in the foreclosure rate during that concussive downturn was associated with an overall, though marginal, increase in suicide rates. The increase was higher for white males than any other race or gender group, however.
“Research for many years and across social and health science fields has demonstrated a strong relationship between economic downturns and an increase in deaths due to suicide,” Sarah Burgard an associate professor of sociology at the University of Michigan, explained in an email on Thursday.
The dramatic rise in opioid addiction also can't be overlooked, experts say, though untangling accidental from intentional deaths by overdose can be difficult. The CDC has calculated that suicides from opioid overdoses nearly doubled between 1999 and 2014, and data from a 2014 national survey showed that individuals addicted to prescription opioids had a 40 percent to 60 percent higher risk of suicidal ideation. Habitual users of opioids were twice as likely to attempt suicide as people who did not use them.
High suicide numbers in the United States are not a new phenomenon. In 1999, then-Surgeon General David Satcher issued a report on the state of mental health in the country and called suicide “a significant public health problem.” The latest data at that time showed about 30,000 suicides a year.
Kaslow is particularly concerned about what has emerged with suicide among women. The report’s findings came just two days after 55-year-old fashion designer Kate Spade took her own life in New York — action her husband attributed to the severe depression she had been battling.
“Historically, men had higher death rates than women,” Kaslow noted. “That's equalizing not because men are [committing suicide] less but women are doing it more. That is very, very troublesome.”




Death rates for prostate cancer fell for two decades. A study released May 22 shows advanced cases of the disease are rising. (Elyse Samuels/The Washington Post)
Among the stark numbers in the CDC report was the one signaling a high number of suicides among people with no diagnosed mental health condition. In the 27 states that use the National Violent Death Reporting System, 54 percent of suicides fell into this category.
But Joshua Gordon, director of the National Institute of Mental Health,said that statistic must be viewed in context.
“When you do a psychological autopsy and go and look carefully at medical records and talk to family members of the victims,” he said, “90 percent will have evidence of a mental health condition.” That indicates a large portion weren’t diagnosed, “which suggests to me that they’re not getting the help they need,” he said.
Cultural attitudes may play a part. Those without a known mental health condition, according to the report, were more likely to be male and belong to a racial or ethnic minority.
“The data supports what we know about that notion,” Gordon said. “Men and Hispanics especially are less likely to seek help.”
The problems most frequently associated with suicide, according to the study, are strained relationships; life stressors, often involving work or finances; substance use problems; physical health conditions; and recent or impending crises. The most important takeaway, mental health professionals say, is that suicide is an issue not only for the mentally ill but for anyone struggling with serious lifestyle problems.
“I think this gets back to what do we need to be teaching people — how to manage breakups, job stresses,” said Christine Moutier, medical director of the American Foundation for Suicide Prevention. “What are we doing as a nation to help people to manage these things? Because anybody can experience those stresses. Anybody.”

People without known mental health conditions were more likely to be male and to die by firearm. (CDC)
The rates of suicide for all states and the District of Columbia were calculated using data from the National Vital Statistics System. Information about contributing circumstances for those who died by suicide was obtained via the National Violent Death Reporting System, which is relatively new and in place in only 27 states.
“If you think of [suicide] as other leading causes of death, like AIDS and cancer, with the public health approach, mortality rates decline,” Moutier said. “We know that same approach can work with suicide.”
 
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P-Squared

Humble Servant ******
Jan 31, 2012
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#7
Not meaning to imply that even one suicide is not tragic, however quoting a statistic of percentages without knowing the baseline actual number, one can not determine if the change is significant. The data is certainly interesting, but it wouldn't be something I would use to decide a course of action.

IMHO
 
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Nov 10, 2010
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#8
I hate to see an adolescent/young adult die. But over 25 meh, I have better shit to worry about. Ultimate expression of freedom really. We don't know the demons behind why. For me, I have seen Alzheimer's in action and I think I could off myself if I got diagnosed with that and it got bad. The key would be to do it before you forgot how.
I am not trying to be an asshole, I cant save everyone nor am I going to try.
 
Dec 20, 2017
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There's been a sharp increase in social acceptance of suicide in the last decade. We've seen laws in some States allowing suicide with conditions attached. Usually, or all, medical and already very close to death. We accept it, some insist on it, with our pets. We give them "dignity" and as I stated before, it's just more socially acceptable. Maybe reporting by agencies has changed to reflect less of a Religious need to call it NOT a suicide may play a role in the increase.

As stated above, a baseline would be nice for comparison.

And going through it is devastating.
 
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EGwhisper

Full Member
Feb 14, 2017
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#21
Rural states Trump won are seeing the biggest increases.

I think it’s primarily economic with some cultural acceptance mixed in. It’s tragic for families dealing with it.
Ah natural selection always takes its course. Meanwhile, property values and employment rates are inversely affected.
 

mijp5

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May 7, 2009
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#23
Multifactorial. Swelling debt, advancing technology, stagflation, etc. Things just haven't gotten any easier over time
 
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RNWRKNP

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#25
Suicide, is a cowards way out of something, that was almost always created by their own hand. Living a life of lies, or being a plastic person tends to be self leveling at some point. Mother-natures way of correction.
Used to think like you amigo but reality is that you and I have the chemical make up to get knocked down, brush ourselves off and go at it again. I learned the hard way that not everybody does. Are there times when there is some truth to what your saying.....perhaps but it’s not a clear cut dynamic.
 
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mijp5

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May 7, 2009
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#26
Used to think like you amigo but reality is that you and I have the chemical make up to get knocked down, brush ourselves off and go at it again. I learned the hard way that not everybody does. Are there times when there is some truth to what your saying.....perhaps but it’s not a clear cut dynamic.
Or, get knocked down for the 10th time but just don’t have an 11th in you. I can empathize with this for sure. A life of pain and disappointment can really suck to have to wake up to every morning.
 
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ArmyJerry

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Nov 22, 2012
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Over my life time things have gotten much easier, much safer, wealth growth is much faster and larger. Our population has gotten soft and the weak make it to suicidal ages now.

Multifactorial. Swelling debt, advancing technology, stagflation, etc. Things just haven't gotten any easier over time
 
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RNWRKNP

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Dec 13, 2017
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#30
I would suggest that the skills to cope with hardship are being watered down or simply not passed down. I would also suggest that that the medical field has much yet to learn about the chemical make up of the human physiology. Over medicating, under medicating or not medicating. My simplistic understanding completely opened my eyes to possibility’s that my ignorant ass hadn’t considered. Take everything I have, drop me in some inner city with no resources and I will figure out a way to make eneough money to buy a bus ticket to opportunity. Took me a long time to figure out that not everybody is wired that. Hard to understand a problem when your not wired the other way.
 
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Feb 19, 2012
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#32
There is most certainly a tipping point where stress or even physical pain can pitch our chemical balances entirely fucking sideways. Some of us have a hard earned depth of character that allows us to weather the storm and some don't. I've seen dark days and walked away stronger than I was before, but I'm not convinced it makes me any better than the folks that couldn't find their way through.

I think we tend to over medicate people that are hurting. Our bodies will usually straighten themselves out if we recognize the sources of the problems and act accordingly. That's not to say that an individual that is absolutely at the end of their rope shouldn't resort to meds/counseling.
 

mijp5

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May 7, 2009
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#33
When it comes to depression, in my experience, no medication is even close to a miracle. At best, standard regimen SS or SNRIs dull a person’s mind to apathy, which some will argue is better than depression. I personally don’t see it as a solution.
 
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Feb 11, 2017
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#34
Trump is President.

Liberals, incapable of rationale thought, steered by knee jerk feelings have been losing their minds ever since.

Suicide rates go up.


Hmmmm?
yea the fuckers don't know if their man or women or what! Might as well die and find out!
 

RNWRKNP

Sophisticated Redneck
Dec 13, 2017
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#35
When it comes to depression, in my experience, no medication is even close to a miracle. At best, standard regimen SS or SNRIs dull a person’s mind to apathy, which some will argue is better than depression. I personally don’t see it as a solution.
Agree and disagree. Agree that there is no magic pill currently available and if there were, what worked for one is not going to work for all. Without the medication the highs and lows are to much and with medication it’s a balancing act to find middle ground without detrimental side effects. Exercise and diet play a huge role with a huge impact on medications needed. Comepletely agree with apathy being a shitty way to walk through the day.
 

Maggot

Philo-Sophia Fidelis et veritas
Jul 27, 2007
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#37
Take everything I have, drop me in some inner city with no resources and I will figure out a way to make eneough money to buy a bus ticket to opportunity. Took me a long time to figure out that not everybody is wired that. Hard to understand a problem when your not wired the other way.
Its not just 'wiring'. Its also what your past experience is. If all youve ever known is "inner city" then you have no experience, outside television perhaps, of anything else so their ability to motivate toward it is less than yours who has an actual experience. You can expand that to cultures. We are so quick to condemn other cultures for not progressing more quickly when given the chance but just like the person who cant get out of the ghetto, they have no experience of democracy and freedom. They have no outline or blueprint built into them by experience.

Miip5
"Or, get knocked down for the 10th time but just don’t have an 11th in you. I can empathize with this for sure. A life of pain and disappointment can really suck to have to wake up to every morning. "

No shit. Because of child abuse that was my life for the first 50 years or so. I was knocked down so much I didnt know there was an up. Thoughts of suicide were my constant companion. Only the intervention of two 'angelic' type beings stopped me. Somewhere around 50 I got a different view, but what kept me alive that long is a mystery. Too goddamn mean to die I reckon.

It is my considered opinion, that if youre in so much physical pain, that life has no quality, say due to cancer or the like, it is youre God given right, to terminate your physical journey here.
 
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Maggot

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#39
When it comes to depression, in my experience, no medication is even close to a miracle. At best, standard regimen SS or SNRIs dull a person’s mind to apathy, which some will argue is better than depression. I personally don’t see it as a solution.
Do some research on the use of psycho active chemicals for depression and PTSD type problems. LSD was actually created as a therapeutic tool before it was abused. Others show great promise as well. This is not careless drug abuse but in conjunction with therapy.


http://r.search.yahoo.com/_ylt=AwrN...eatment//RK=2/RS=04c3nQ7QLwhv93joO6k9HaKMNCI-


https://r.search.yahoo.com/_ylt=Awr...ory.html/RK=2/RS=xc_pR1MvoLGla97Whrn10tnUzS0-

http://r.search.yahoo.com/_ylt=AwrN...or-ptsd//RK=2/RS=3L0rHwIqEnbSDn_X7yeBvkU3QV8-
 

mijp5

Gunny Sergeant
May 7, 2009
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I started typing about hallucinogens in the post but erased it because I didn’t want to open a can of worms, but since you mentioned it, yes they have some promise to them. Ketamine infusions are already being done, however, I’ve heard that some people are experiencing psychosis and mania following the treatments which is disappointing. Low dose lsd has been getting looked at and maybe it is the answer. It’s gonna be a struggle to bring that to the therapeutic arena because it is still classified as schedule 1.
 
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Maggot

Philo-Sophia Fidelis et veritas
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#42
I started typing about hallucinogens in the post but erased it because I didn’t want to open a can of worms, but since you mentioned it, yes they have some promise to them. Ketamine infusions are already being done, however, I’ve heard that some people are experiencing psychosis and mania following the treatments which is disappointing. Low dose lsd has been getting looked at and maybe it is the answer. It’s gonna be a struggle to bring that to the therapeutic arena because it is still classified as schedule 1.
Especially since big Pharma will fight it to the death. They dont want you to get well, they want to keep selling you poison for your entire life.

" Low dose lsd has been getting looked at and maybe it is the answer."

Micro dose, and yes it seems to have some really good outcomes.
 
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mijp5

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May 7, 2009
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#43
Another one that hasn’t gotten much press is low dose naltrexone. I actually started it I think around April. It’s used to treat all sorts of afflictions, mainly autoimmune disorders, but also depression. Seems like it works ok, but no miracles. It’s a very innocuous drug and the side effect profile is extraordinarily low
 
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TripleBull

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#44
I hate to see an adolescent/young adult die. But over 25 meh, I have better shit to worry about. Ultimate expression of freedom really. We don't know the demons behind why. For me, I have seen Alzheimer's in action and I think I could off myself if I got diagnosed with that and it got bad. The key would be to do it before you forgot how.
I am not trying to be an asshole, I cant save everyone nor am I going to try.
I hear you. I know the story of old squaw that walked away from the tribe when she felt it was time to remove the burden from the others. She said her last goodbyes, then wandered away. I don't know that I'd set the caring age at 25, but there's no right answer to that kind of question.
 
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snbyiggidy1

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Mar 15, 2018
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#45
How many of these are assisted or planned due to medical issues? As stated before socially we have accepted suicide and legalized it in many states. I know this most likely does not account for the younger groups but might for the total. Despite the fact guns account for the majority I believe if they were not accessible the individual would find a way. I have worked in EMS for 20 years and have seen some very motivated suicides. If they want to kill themselves they will make it happen. Went on one once where the young male tied a rope to his bunk bed and sat down on the floor making the rope tight enough. He could have just stood back up but didn’t. Have seen others with drugs, hanging over the door from door knob, trees, and several who have shot themselves. Again if motivates they are successful no matter the tool used. Seen lots of natural death too. Not to be cold but after a while it is hard to feel sad over any of them. We all die at some point.
 

TripleBull

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#46
Especially since big Pharma will fight it to the death. They dont want you to get well, they want to keep selling you poison for your entire life.

" Low dose lsd has been getting looked at and maybe it is the answer."

Micro dose, and yes it seems to have some really good outcomes.
When I was high school through undergrad, a local university conducted research (and I only slightly snicker at calling what they did "research".) on micro dose to moderate dose with a variety of topical impacts. A good friend of mine participated so I got to observe while it was ongoing, and for years after. He was in a group of non-technical people that was speed-taught physics, calculus, etc. He actually learned atomic physics fairly well. I was taking all the related coursework in the non-speed classes at about the same time as my friend. The study also had a different focal point topic on people fighting depression but at the time (late 60's - mid 70's) I don't think it was known to be anywhere near the beast it's recognized to be today.

Put it this way - if you go to any significant population center in the world, you have a very high probability of detecting a whole host of antidepressants and related metabolites in the waste-water and you don't even need world class methods and analytical equipment to detect them. Since those compounds get through waste treatment to a significant degree, we feed it to everything below. If you look at some of the reports of passive sampling studies, be prepared to feel a little depressed.
 
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TripleBull

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#47
How many of these are assisted or planned due to medical issues?
But "medical issues" can have a very wide range of definition.


As stated before socially we have accepted suicide and legalized it in many states. I know this most likely does not account for the younger groups but might for the total. Despite the fact guns account for the majority I believe if they were not accessible the individual would find a way. I have worked in EMS for 20 years and have seen some very motivated suicides. If they want to kill themselves they will make it happen. Went on one once where the young male tied a rope to his bunk bed and sat down on the floor making the rope tight enough. He could have just stood back up but didn’t. Have seen others with drugs, hanging over the door from door knob, trees, and several who have shot themselves. Again if motivates they are successful no matter the tool used. Seen lots of natural death too. Not to be cold but after a while it is hard to feel sad over any of them. We all die at some point.
I worked as an EMS a while too and I applaud those that can dedicate their work life to being around and trying to protect those in trauma. We saw way more murder than suicide. I've also seen the aftermath of what you term "very motivated suicides". I guess life before suicide was not pretty to some of the people that decide to check out, so they don't care about the minutia of their aftermath.
 

Maggot

Philo-Sophia Fidelis et veritas
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#48
Put it this way - if you go to any significant population center in the world, you have a very high probability of detecting a whole host of antidepressants and related metabolites in the waste-water and you don't even need world class methods and analytical equipment to detect them. Since those compounds get through waste treatment to a significant degree, we feed it to everything below. If you look at some of the reports of passive sampling studies, be prepared to feel a little depressed.
That is scary.

Iits taken into the plants, say cattle feed, it takes 10 pounds of feed to make 1 pound of beef so your getting the impact 10X.

A good reason to raise your own food and eat organically when possible.
 

TripleBull

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#49
When it comes to depression, in my experience, no medication is even close to a miracle. At best, standard regimen SS or SNRIs dull a person’s mind to apathy, which some will argue is better than depression. I personally don’t see it as a solution.
Agreed. I have witnessed a few people with good to excellent results, but many more that just managed to jump down a different, steeper spiral. That, too, may have been an inevitable outcome.

I've read success stories by survivors that ended up moving out to low population density areas in the American west. I'm not convinced it was the meds that "cured" them.
 
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