slick up a model 92 win

tomcatmv

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Apr 13, 2017
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I have a Puma 92 win re-pro that I'd like to get slicked up a bit, maybe even replace the lever with an oversized one. I'm in Belton (central TX) so near me would be good. Any suggestions on a smith?
 

rth1800

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For what a quality job will cost you you can buy a real ‘92 Win. It will be slick.

Other option would be to just work action and shoot the one you have slick.
 

chevy_man

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Jan 25, 2019
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Get out your emory cloth, fine finish files, and get to work.

Most of the time you can make them cycle beautifully by just polishing the wear spots just enough to smooth them up.

Or just shoot a few thousand rounds. It'll polish itself.
 

GH41

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In the old days we would slick up a new pump gun with graphite powder. Work it till you got it where you wanted the flush it out and oil.
 

Cowcatcher

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Dec 15, 2017
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NE Oklahoma
https://stevesgunz.com/

Or buy a spring kit and install yourself. Online vids make it fairly easy to do if you're halfway handy with tools. I've done quite a few for myself and mates, they slick up nicely.
Yep! I bought a kit from Steve that included his instructional DVD. It was pretty easy to follow along. He made things real simple. It made a big improvement. I could take it back apart and make it nicer I'm sure. I figured the first time I wouldn't get too carried away. Steve pretty much says in his video that if you slick em up to where they are super smooth, they are closer to breaking down. He makes a comparison to a race car. Anyhow, it didn't cost much, it was fun and it definitely made a difference. Everything cycles smoother, the loading gate isn't as stiff and it holds more rounds in the mag tube.
The only thing I learned to be careful with is the screws in the barrel bands. The factory flathead screws had slots that were cut crooked and the notches were so deep that the heads actually broke in half upon removal.