Should Apple Unlock Pensacola Shooter's Phone?

GBMaryland

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GB,

I'm not disagreeing with you. I'm only saying that maybe an Apple employee is more likely to advise a LE agency on what vulnerabilities might exist, and find solutions to exploit those vulnerabilities.

We'll see what happens this time.
If caught by apple theyd be fired, and they never get another tech job again.

Disclosing of a vulnerability that effects hundreds of millions of people and potentially cause serious damage worldwide is not a good enough reason to open the phone for somebody.
 
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candyx

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Your worry about unlocking a phone of a terrorist over privacy concerns ???? The day you leave the cell phone store your being listened to and tracked with GPS 24/7/365. Only place on earth that you could get a little privacy is in a cave in Afghanistan. Pay phones kept you much safer back in the day.
.phone1.jpg
 
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Hollywood 6mm

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Flori-duh.
There is no “unlocking.” Apple has already turned over the data to which they have access. The remaining data is encrypted and Apple can’t get into it any more than I can. What the government is asking is for Apple to create backdoors, weakening the encryption. And of course only the government would have access, and it would never be abused.
...and even if they did create that 'back door' it would be useless in this case with no way to access the device to perform an iOS update.

I say fuck that terrorist. He has no rights. We already know the fbi can crack it so why even ask apple to do it for them. They already refused with the San Bernardino shooter. I applaud apple for respecting privacy, but when terrorism is involved they should step up.
Eh.... not exactly. *IF* (and that's a big IF) the FBI actually did access the data on the San Bernadino phone, it was an older phone without the same encryption system as the current iPhone and iPads going back ~4-5 years. They're not cracking jack shit on the Pensacola asshole's phone.

An Apple employee came forward and did the work on the San Bernardino shooter's phone. It can be done.
See previous comment. That was a very specific case on older hardware with weaker encryption - and I am skeptical that they cracked it even then. You're not breaking the encryption on a current iPhone without some *serious* extenuating circumstances.
 
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DarnYankeeUSMC

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I think that some important people sold a shit ton of Apple stock. The DOJ comes out and slams them along with the propaganda networks. Apple stock takes a hit and the Birkenstock crowd along with the other apple geeks think that they snubbed Big Brother. After a few days and Apple leaking some new bullshit feature those sellers are now buying back to double up on their investment.


Either way.
We are talking about a Saudi national/terrorist. Even if there was information on the phone that the Crown Prince ordered the attack. There would be a line of United States Congressmen waiting to suck his dick. Of their own volition or on order from another source they would get on their knees and suck away.
 

MotorOilMcCall

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The shooter is NOT a US Citizen, he is a Saudi national. Therefore, he has no privacy rights here, and the constitution does not apply to him.

What's the question?
 

MarinePMI

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The shooter is NOT a US Citizen, he is a Saudi national. Therefore, he has no privacy rights here, and the constitution does not apply to him.

What's the question?

Incorrect. Resident aliens are afforded the same protections as US citizens. It's why it's illegal to spy on them within the US as well. It's part of the mandatory annual Intelligence Oversight briefing many of us have to have every year...
 
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DarnYankeeUSMC

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The shooter is NOT a US Citizen, he is a Saudi national. Therefore, he has no privacy rights here, and the constitution does not apply to him.

What's the question?
The government doesn't want a single phone accessed. They want access to all of them. Apple already gave them everything they have access to.

RIF
 

alpine44

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The whole argument about obtaining valuable intelligence is just PR bullshit.

Our enemies have moved from a centrally-governed terror franchise to independent sole-proprietors a long time ago. If the Tsarnaev brothers can orchestrate a bombing without traceable support then how much external, traceable support is even needed to go "Allahu Akbar" with a pistol?

There will be nothing of value on this phone. This is just a fishing expedition to legalize more mass surveillance.
 
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j-huskey

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Privacy? Lol...

Why should data on my phone be "untouchable" but my stuff in my deposit box not? Stuff in my safe? Where is that line drawn in the illusion of "privacy"?

A valid warrant is acceptable for one but not the other?

Hmmm seems we have a issue here.

I also find that the govt being vocal about their inability to access...quite peculiar...as if there is an ulterior motive. That might just be me...being cynical.
A valid warrant for your safe deposit box is specific, pay attention, SPECIFIC....
your box, your child porn, based on real cause. Because you showed it to the little girl you molested and gave a std.
And then a valid warrant for your DNA, your medical records, and other evidence that ties you to that specific crime and the std the little girl now has.

All search warrant applications do NOT get approved because they lack standing, are overbroad (not specific), or are obvious fishing expeditions that violate the Constitution.

Bad warrants get thrown out, any evidence seized is fruit of the poisonous tree. Cant be used.

Not all items found in your safe deposit box can be used against you in this porn case.

FB1 cannot get any court to issue a valid specific warrant that compels Apple to unlock a code that affects millions of uninvolved users privacy for FB1 to free rein search for "possible" non specified evidence.

They cant get a fisa judge to issue a national security exception search warrant to Apple because it would violate the privacy of millions of users. It's just not going to travel.

Your safe deposit box (specific) doesnt hold any "thing" tied to those uninvolved millions who lease Apple code iOS services (overbroad), so your box vs apple iOS service is not a equal comparison, especially when it comes to the specificity of search warrants.

Apple turned over the available evidence Bell or AT&T would turn over pursuant to a valid warrant for normal use records.

FB1 wants more than the law and Constitution allows. FB1 wants what the courts wont give them.
The legal system supports Apple, not the FB1.

The FB1 is using the court of public opinion "terrorism" threat to try to extort extra legal, unconstitutional access from Apple, that no legal court will give them,

Because the courts are protecting the privacy rights of 300+ million US citizens that use the service.

And this has been voiced in many ways, better that 100 guilty go free than one (1) innocent suffer...

So, the FB1 uses a fear tactic to try to end run the Constitution.

No offense or implication intended Salty, using the porn/molester example on your safe deposit box.

I can see this post going to shit real fast... oh well..
 

OldSalty

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A valid warrant for your safe deposit box is specific, pay attention, SPECIFIC....
your box, your child porn, based on real cause. Because you showed it to the little girl you molested and gave a std.
And then a valid warrant for your DNA, your medical records, and other evidence that ties you to that specific crime and the std the little girl now has.

All search warrant applications do NOT get approved because they lack standing, are overbroad (not specific), or are obvious fishing expeditions that violate the Constitution.

Bad warrants get thrown out, any evidence seized is fruit of the poisonous tree. Cant be used.

Not all items found in your safe deposit box can be used against you in this porn case.

FB1 cannot get any court to issue a valid specific warrant that compels Apple to unlock a code that affects millions of uninvolved users privacy for FB1 to free rein search for "possible" non specified evidence.

They cant get a fisa judge to issue a national security exception search warrant to Apple because it would violate the privacy of millions of users. It's just not going to travel.

Your safe deposit box (specific) doesnt hold any "thing" tied to those uninvolved millions who lease Apple code iOS services (overbroad), so your box vs apple iOS service is not a equal comparison, especially when it comes to the specificity of search warrants.

Apple turned over the available evidence Bell or AT&T would turn over pursuant to a valid warrant for normal use records.

FB1 wants more than the law and Constitution allows. FB1 wants what the courts wont give them.
The legal system supports Apple, not the FB1.

The FB1 is using the court of public opinion "terrorism" threat to try to extort extra legal, unconstitutional access from Apple, that no legal court will give them,

Because the courts are protecting the privacy rights of 300+ million US citizens that use the service.

And this has been voiced in many ways, better that 100 guilty go free than one (1) innocent suffer...

So, the FB1 uses a fear tactic to try to end run the Constitution.

No offense or implication intended Salty, using the porn/molester example on your safe deposit box.

I can see this post going to shit real fast... oh well..
LOL nah, all good man. I absolutely understand what you are saying and I agree with much of what you say, at least in principle. Your posts are very insightful. And I also admit I am purposely taking a counter position to illustrate what I believe is a point and I understand it might be unpopular or "stupid" to some. That's fine.

The issue however that I see you mentioning above is the validity of a warrant for an "object" of interest versus the veracity. Any invalid warrant based on shoddy evidence or otherwise incomplete goes without saying...it shouldn't past muster. And it shouldn't really be executed to gain access to any "object" in possession of a third party. But I also get this is the real world and this is abused as much as anything else.

But, the warrant for the data on the phone if valid, backed by evidence and substantiated (at least to whatever minimum requirements set forth) is somehow invalid because of "muh privacy"?
 
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Hollywood 6mm

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Flori-duh.
But, the warrant for the data on the phone if valid, backed by evidence and substantiated (at least to whatever minimum requirements set forth) is somehow invalid because of "muh privacy"?
It's invalid because it's something the subject of the warrant (Apple) can't provide because they don't have it. You can't use a search warrant to force someone to make something that doesn't exist so you can look for evidence.

Lets put it like this. You are a building contractor. You built a house. You installed the locks, but the owner changed the locks (set their own password) after you built the house and sold it to them. You don't have the keys - and then the police hit you with a search warrant to pick the locks (that you didn't set up) on the house because you built it.
 

W54/XM-388

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But, the warrant for the data on the phone if valid, backed by evidence and substantiated (at least to whatever minimum requirements set forth) is somehow invalid because of "muh privacy"?
Kind of missing the point, and like so many others, playing right into the hands of the government who actually doesn't care about the data, they just want you to willingly hand over yet another freedom.... because well bad people can't have privacy..... So you get all interested in giving up your privacy to pretty much anyone for any purpose.... (Oh you think the government's back doors will only stay with some "good" guys in the government?)

The data on the phone is encrypted / protected by a secret that (unless someone can prove otherwise) is known only to the now dead party.
Apple states that they can't provide it, because that secret is only known to the now dead party, but others are welcome to try to pick any flaws in the system & have at it.

Next of course will be those clamouring that the government should be able to beat your passwords out of you or throw you in jail for not handing them over (like is the law in dear old no freedom for the good England). If you can't see why the government being able to run roughshod over your right to be silent is a bad thing... well might as well stop worrying about your 2A rights or any others and just be a sheep.....

What the government actually is after, is a PR campaign to get the public on the side of "demanding" that everyone making any kind of encryption, puts in backdoors and hidden keys that the government can use anytime they want. Which of course means every government at every level all around the world will then of course insist on the same and then every crook and hacker will now have access to all your data.

This battle was fought and won on the side of freedom and security a long time ago, but now the government is coming around trying to take that away using "terrorism" or "the children" just like everything else.
 

Hollywood 6mm

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Flori-duh.
What the government actually is after, is a PR campaign to get the public on the side of "demanding" that everyone making any kind of encryption, puts in backdoors and hidden keys that the government can use anytime they want. Which of course means every government at every level all around the world will then of course insist on the same and then every crook and hacker will now have access to all your data.
Exactly. The irony is that government uses iOS on their own devices, and unless they somehow also convince Apple to split the OS and provide the government with a private development branch (which isn't going to happen), then the government devices will have the exact same back door in them - which an adversary can then exploit.
 

j-huskey

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"Muh prii-vah-cee" is a lost cause for anyone engaging in electronic intercourse (of any kind) today. Once you mash send, lots of tags set their hook and pull your stuff in.
That whore "Alexa" and her sweet voice are the siren's sound luring you to smash your prii-vah-cee against the rocks, and into electronic slavery...
Electronic communication is another form of S&M abuse you willingly pay to receive... and many enjoy.
Just another slide away....
Beware of electronic whoremasters....
Just sayin....

vr
 
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Sean the Nailer

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On a completely different tangent, and yet along the same line (I believe) the concept of 'creating a back-door' is synonymous with the "bar-coded firing-pin". They don't exist, any attempts haven't actually worked, and yet laws were passed demanding that they be mandatory.

Same/Same yet different, no?

"I don't care how, just get it done" is what's being said.
 

Hollywood 6mm

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Flori-duh.
On a completely different tangent, and yet along the same line (I believe) the concept of 'creating a back-door' is synonymous with the "bar-coded firing-pin". They don't exist, any attempts haven't actually worked, and yet laws were passed demanding that they be mandatory.

Same/Same yet different, no?

"I don't care how, just get it done" is what's being said.
Apple could build in a back door in future software/hardware releases, but that wouldn't even help in the Pensacola case, as there's no way to install the software without also destroying the contents. However, doing so would be suicidal for their business model.
 

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Hollywood 6mm

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Flori-duh.
That's pretty fucking hilarious.

Good luck to them. They'll need it.
 
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OldSalty

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I wonder how Apple sells iphones in China w/o having a way for Chinese agencies to access the encrypted data...?

I am sure Apple being the Patron Saint of "muh-privacy" tells China to go F-themselves. Amirite?

Hrrmmm.... :unsure:
 
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phlegethon

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I wonder how Apple sells iphones in China w/o having a way for Chinese agencies to access the encrypted data...?

I am sure Apple being the Patron Saint of "muh-privacy" tells China to go F-themselves. Amirite?

Hrrmmm.... :unsure:
No, Apple complies with local laws, including those of China:

“These legal provisions even seem to be affecting the operational decisions of foreign companies. In response to the Cybersecurity Law, Apple announced in January 2018 that it would migrate iCloud data for Chinese users to a domestic cloud service provider run by Guizhou-Cloud Big Data, a division of China Telecom. The decision seems to have been motivated in part by joint venture requirements and the data localization provision in the Cybersecurity Law, but it appears that the legal obligation to assist Chinese authorities also played a role: Apple later clarified that it would also transfer the encryption keys for Chinese iCloud accounts to China. This move is likely to streamline the process of providing user data to Chinese authorities upon request, though some have questioned whether Apple’s joint venture partner can act unilaterally if such requests are made.”
 

Hollywood 6mm

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Flori-duh.
No, Apple complies with local laws, including those of China:

“These legal provisions even seem to be affecting the operational decisions of foreign companies. In response to the Cybersecurity Law, Apple announced in January 2018 that it would migrate iCloud data for Chinese users to a domestic cloud service provider run by Guizhou-Cloud Big Data, a division of China Telecom. The decision seems to have been motivated in part by joint venture requirements and the data localization provision in the Cybersecurity Law, but it appears that the legal obligation to assist Chinese authorities also played a role: Apple later clarified that it would also transfer the encryption keys for Chinese iCloud accounts to China. This move is likely to streamline the process of providing user data to Chinese authorities upon request, though some have questioned whether Apple’s joint venture partner can act unilaterally if such requests are made.”
Note that that only applies to iCloud backups, *not* to the hardware encryption on the phone itself.
 

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phlegethon

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Note that that only applies to iCloud backups, *not* to the hardware encryption on the phone itself.
Right. China has not yet passed a law requiring backdoors in encrypted devices, although the article I linked above speculates this will happen soon, as it has in Russia. It will be interesting to see what course of action Apple will take then (or when our own police state passes such a law).
 

Hollywood 6mm

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Flori-duh.
Right. China has not yet passed a law requiring backdoors in encrypted devices, although the article I linked above speculates this will happen soon, as it has in Russia. It will be interesting to see what course of action Apple will take then (or when our own police state passes such a law).
Apple already makes a specific model family for China and Hong Kong, so I would guess that they'd drop the hardware encryption module from those phones to comply, and probably make some software changes to comply with China - without compromising any other models.
 

OldSalty

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So wait, Apple isnt the Patron Saint of "muh-privacy"?

Who would have gue$$ed?
 

phlegethon

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So wait, Apple isnt the Patron Saint of "muh-privacy"?

Who would have gue$$ed?
They are the only major computer company that has any track record of defending privacy, and they’re one of the only ones where the business model is not selling user data to third parties. No entity is perfect, but Apple appears to be pretty damn good on this issue, from all available data.
 

OldSalty

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To be honest, Im good with selective morality to make money. I mean who isnt?
 

magtech

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The phones give all the info the cops need. This thing is only a show to A. Make apple look like they protect people and B. make it look like the government doesnt already have access. What a fucking joke.

Plain and simple. The gov has access to any of your electronic info they want at the federal level.
 

phlegethon

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The phones give all the info the cops need. This thing is only a show to A. Make apple look like they protect people and B. make it look like the government doesnt already have access. What a fucking joke.

Plain and simple. The gov has access to any of your electronic info they want at the federal level.
Where is the evidence of this?
 
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magtech

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Where is the evidence of this?
Does the government have access to all phone companies records. Of course. See this link
Quote from the link "Under the government’s so-called Section 215 powers, the NSA collects millions of phone records every year by compelling U.S. phone giants to turn over daily records, a classified program first revealed in a secret court order compelling Verizon "

The programs are classified or fouo which they are led under. So I can bring you no further proof, other than news articles. But i can tell you this. Everything we do in the electronic world is tracked.

Lets go outside of the internet. Try to transmit from a modified RF radio above the legal spectrum. Do it for a while and see if they do a RF sweep to let you know you're fucking up.

If you dont believe me you dont have to... But dont come on here crying when you finally realize they collect everything.

Edit:

As long as i'm wasting my time pulling up this garbage.. Lets see, o yeah. All your voting records are held by the gov and used by the parties to know more about you. Shit they even tie you Social media to how you think. You dont think they have a complete profile of everyone and known contacts etc. etc. Here's a link for reference: https://money.cnn.com/2017/06/19/technology/voter-data-leaked-online-gop/index.html
"The leaked information, compiled by Republican data firm Deep Root Analytics and two other Republican contractors, included names, birth dates, addresses, voter registration details and social media posts. "

I could go into medical records. Call patterning. Give someone your current phone number and someone can easily get you location data, metrics about you, internet history.

"But the government doest track that much" Let's take Micheal Flynn's case for example. What was something that he was tracked doing to communicate discretely.. He was typing in a google account and not sending the info. But letting the letters sit there for someone else to read. Yes, this was tracked. So if you type in facebook, for instance, then delete it without sending it.... Tracked. If you cannot put these together to get a BASIC idea of the synaptics of tracking.... I cannot help you
 
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phlegethon

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Does the government have access to all phone companies records. Of course. See this link
Quote from the link "Under the government’s so-called Section 215 powers, the NSA collects millions of phone records every year by compelling U.S. phone giants to turn over daily records, a classified program first revealed in a secret court order compelling Verizon "

The programs are classified or fouo which they are led under. So I can bring you no further proof, other than news articles. But i can tell you this. Everything we do in the electronic world is tracked.

Lets go outside of the internet. Try to transmit from a modified RF radio above the legal spectrum. Do it for a while and see if they do a RF sweep to let you know you're fucking up.

If you dont believe me you dont have to... But dont come on here crying when you finally realize they collect everything.

Edit:

As long as i'm wasting my time pulling up this garbage.. Lets see, o yeah. All your voting records are held by the gov and used by the parties to know more about you. Shit they even tie you Social media to how you think. You dont think they have a complete profile of everyone and known contacts etc. etc. Here's a link for reference: https://money.cnn.com/2017/06/19/technology/voter-data-leaked-online-gop/index.html
"The leaked information, compiled by Republican data firm Deep Root Analytics and two other Republican contractors, included names, birth dates, addresses, voter registration details and social media posts. "

I could go into medical records. Call patterning. Give someone your current phone number and someone can easily get you location data, metrics about you, internet history.

"But the government doest track that much" Let's take Micheal Flynn's case for example. What was something that he was tracked doing to communicate discretely.. He was typing in a google account and not sending the info. But letting the letters sit there for someone else to read. Yes, this was tracked. So if you type in facebook, for instance, then delete it without sending it.... Tracked. If you cannot put these together to get a BASIC idea of the synaptics of tracking.... I cannot help you
That’s not the same thing as having backdoors into encrypted systems, for which there is no evidence. They have access to the phone records because the phone companies hand over the data, and we all know about that. Let’s not confuse the issue by then saying that they are omniscient and have everything anyway, and there’s no point in fighting for any remaining privacy.

That is kind of like the argument that the second amendment is obsolete because they have tanks and drones.
 
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magtech

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That’s not the same thing as having backdoors into encrypted systems, for which there is no evidence. They have access to the phone records because the phone companies hand over the data, and we all know about that. Let’s not confuse the issue by then saying that they are omniscient and have everything anyway, and there’s no point in fighting for any remaining privacy.

That is kind of like the argument that the second amendment is obsolete because they have tanks and drones.
This isnt directly related to apple, but it says all it needs to say to suffice the point.
"Stamos asked Rogers how companies such as Yahoo, with 1.3 billion users worldwide, would be expected to reply to parallel requests for backdoors from foreign governments, and told Rogers such backdoors would be like “drilling a hole through a windshield”.

“I’ve got a lot of world-class cryptographers at the National Security Agency,” replied Rogers, skipping over the question of foreign government requests. “I think that this is technically feasible. Now it needs to done within a framework.”

This was 2015. And the guy in charge was confident he could get access. Then he just wanted to make it legally into a system.

Here is an article that talks how encryption is intentionally flawed when created (thanks to government interaction) to create direct and indirect backdoors.

"Revelations over the past couple of years highlight the importance of understanding malicious and surreptitious weakening of cryptographic systems. We provide an overview of this d a number of historical examples to drive development of a weaknesses taxonomy. This allows comparing domain, using different approaches to sabotage. We categorize a broader set of potential avenues for weakening systems using this taxonomy, and discuss what future research is needed to provide sabotage-resilient cryptography. "

Now lets get to apple
Encryption:
256- bit AES encrtption
HTTPS encryption

Atricle from 2013 discussing how nsa already had a way through it, conviently.

Add all this up and if you cant put it together that we can crack our own encryptions.... Then you're blind.
 

phlegethon

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This isnt directly related to apple, but it says all it needs to say to suffice the point.
"Stamos asked Rogers how companies such as Yahoo, with 1.3 billion users worldwide, would be expected to reply to parallel requests for backdoors from foreign governments, and told Rogers such backdoors would be like “drilling a hole through a windshield”.

“I’ve got a lot of world-class cryptographers at the National Security Agency,” replied Rogers, skipping over the question of foreign government requests. “I think that this is technically feasible. Now it needs to done within a framework.”

This was 2015. And the guy in charge was confident he could get access. Then he just wanted to make it legally into a system.

Here is an article that talks how encryption is intentionally flawed when created (thanks to government interaction) to create direct and indirect backdoors.

"Revelations over the past couple of years highlight the importance of understanding malicious and surreptitious weakening of cryptographic systems. We provide an overview of this d a number of historical examples to drive development of a weaknesses taxonomy. This allows comparing domain, using different approaches to sabotage. We categorize a broader set of potential avenues for weakening systems using this taxonomy, and discuss what future research is needed to provide sabotage-resilient cryptography. "

Now lets get to apple
Encryption:
256- bit AES encrtption
HTTPS encryption

Atricle from 2013 discussing how nsa already had a way through it, conviently.

Add all this up and if you cant put it together that we can crack our own encryptions.... Then you're blind.
Here’s another article from the same site you linked that you might want to read.

The fact that some things are compromised doesn’t mean everything is.
 
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magtech

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You are literally arguing semantics at this point.

These news articles are bait and deception used for 2 reasons.
1. To let people think they are Safe/Secure/Whatever
2. To let terrorists who are involved ( or do similar stuff) not know that the gov is tracking them all along.

It, like most news articles, is a ruse to control how you think and feel about the subject. Gotta protect those classified government systems, you know.
 

Tchitcherine

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"... what has gone underreported is the fact that the two iPhones in question are actually old models, an iPhone 5 and an iPhone 7."

"n 2015, the FBI paid around a million dollars to Cellebrite to unlock the San Bernardino shooter’s iPhone 5C. In the intervening years, the price of access has fallen dramatically."

"Just like in 2015, critics of the government’s approach suggest that this latest instance is political cover to try to pass through legislation that would force companies like Apple to include backdoors in their hardware and software. It isn’t really about the data on these two phones."
 
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equilibrium

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I am sure the FBI has the ability/resources to unlock the phone. They just want to set a precedent to eventually be able to unlock anyone's phone "they" determine is a threat?

I assume Hillary would get a pass.
 
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Hollywood 6mm

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Flori-duh.
You are literally arguing semantics at this point.

These news articles are bait and deception used for 2 reasons.
1. To let people think they are Safe/Secure/Whatever
2. To let terrorists who are involved ( or do similar stuff) not know that the gov is tracking them all along.

It, like most news articles, is a ruse to control how you think and feel about the subject. Gotta protect those classified government systems, you know.
No, he's not. Breaking into an encrypted iPhone isn't remotely the same problem as HTTPs and SSL.
 

magtech

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Ok. Here.. there is nothing on the phone that hasn't gotten on there without moving through the networks. At the server level the information is ciphered to checked encryption and all I known from there... As for breaking AES encryption on an iPhone. Get over yourself... Its a difficulty level of 1-2/10 for the NSA.

Maybe you don't understand how this whole system works... And that's probably a good thing.
 

Hollywood 6mm

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Flori-duh.
Ok. Here.. there is nothing on the phone that hasn't gotten on there without moving through the networks. At the server level the information is ciphered to checked encryption and all I known from there... As for breaking AES encryption on an iPhone. Get over yourself... Its a difficulty level of 1-2/10 for the NSA.

Maybe you don't understand how this whole system works... And that's probably a good thing.
Have you ever done any security work with iOS devices? Read up on how the encryption functions? Read and applied STIGs on them?

Also, your statement that nothing was on the phone that didn't go through the network is incorrect. Plenty of data can be generated on the device that never gets transmitted or copied off the phone.