Screen time for little one, while he's weaned off entirely

Mar 27, 2014
46
10
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Mpls, MN
#1
Disclaimer: I know, I know, ideally little children should be outside scrapping their knees, getting dirty and breathing fresh air. The kid in question was in Thailand for the past 4 month and is having a hard time adjusting to the temps back here in the Midwest.

The kid isn't mine; I got snipped 8 years ago. But I'm moving in with a 2 year old and currently he's a little addicted to some shitty show that is pulverizing his attention span and makes me want to rip my ears off when it's on in the background. I'm not in a position to give parenting advice to his momma, so I'm just trying to redirect and be helpful.

Do you approve of any TV shows for your kids? (If not, good for you, seriously.) He mostly watches on a phone/tablet, so I'm only looking for one's that can be streamed.
Thanks for reading.
 

Greg Langelius *

Resident Elder Fart
Aug 10, 2001
4,998
404
83
Arizona, good place for me...
#3
Remember the length of our attention spans when we were two?

Right, nobody can remember back that young.

Be careful you don't turn into a control freak. That can drive you positively bonkers with a two year old. They will "But, why?" you into an early grave.

And then, there are the tantrums...

I have raised two generations of little ones, and the oldest is now 21.

Oh God not again...!

Greg
 
Jun 6, 2010
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MD
#4
PJ Masks is another good option in addition to the above mentioned. Also anything on the Sprout network, now Universal Kids is ok, this includes Super Wings and The Chica Show I think. Remember Sesame Street is still a good choice and at least has some child focused lessons too.

Good luck and read up on the crazy shit that is sprinkled throughout Youtube Kids, its amazing what videos are considered "safe" for kids on that app.
 
Sep 14, 2010
280
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Hen House,Texas
#5
100% agree. ^^
OP don't forget 2 year old boys love to climb on stuff and tear shit up while making loud noise.
card board boxes and wood spoon on a pot or pan will be sure to pull attention away from nonsense cartoons. This should buy you some time till the weather warms up.
 

sandwarrior

Gunny Sergeant
Apr 21, 2007
4,162
180
63
in yooperland
#7
The best thing you can do is find something you could teach him that holds his attention. Maybe start doing what you're doing 1/2 hour before his show.;) You know...OOOps! missed the show.

This way, you are not really "parenting" him. Just providing your own brand of positive attention.
 
May 20, 2006
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Winnipeg, Mb.
#8
And there are no laws preventing anyone from asking an inquisitive child "why". When all the sudden they realize that they must come up with an answer, it plants the seed of thought into their heads.

And it is the THINKING that is a good thing.
 
Mar 27, 2014
46
10
8
Mpls, MN
#9
Thank you for all the recommendations for shows and apps!

@sandwarrior I wish that he was watching broadcast TV, and that I could use that trick to make him miss his show. But he's watching on a phone, so the way it's been is that when he makes enough of a stink to momma, he gets to watch whenever he wants. I can see the neural pathways forming for addiction *shudder*

Again, he's not mine, I'm just "uncle," so the path of least resistance right now is to leave the area when he's throwing a tantrum, and not get into it about parenting styles with mom, yet...

My dad was amazing when me and my brothers were toddlers, so I have lots of great tricks and activities for when it's just me and him. One trick was he would take us to the airport and we would spend all say running around the concourses and watching planes take off. Way before the days of TSA.
 
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sandwarrior

Gunny Sergeant
Apr 21, 2007
4,162
180
63
in yooperland
#10
Thank you for all the recommendations for shows and apps!

@sandwarrior I wish that he was watching broadcast TV, and that I could use that trick to make him miss his show. But he's watching on a phone, so the way it's been is that when he makes enough of a stink to momma, he gets to watch whenever he wants. I can see the neural pathways forming for addiction *shudder*

Again, he's not mine, I'm just "uncle," so the path of least resistance right now is to leave the area when he's throwing a tantrum, and not get into it about parenting styles with mom, yet...

My dad was amazing when me and my brothers were toddlers, so I have lots of great tricks and activities for when it's just me and him. One trick was he would take us to the airport and we would spend all say running around the concourses and watching planes take off. Way before the days of TSA.
God....you can sure tell how old I am. Back in my day all we had was broadcast tv. No such thing as phone apps. Even watching series reruns was a time thing on cable or renting a set of vids for the weekend and "marathon watching".

Apparently, my neurons haven't formed the "today" path.🤔
 
#11
Let us remember that gut instinct and other politics often turn into advice, even from doctors and others who should know. There is, first, no evidence that TV is bad for our brains:
https://www.psychologytoday.com/us/...0/there-is-no-evidence-television-is-bad-kids

And many of us grew up with TV, so this should be clear. We didn't even dodge a bullet, and there are the slums of the TV-addicted. It's fine.

(Want to see history repeating: just like how we lament the internet means you don't need to learn as you can look it up, there are dawn-of-printing screeds against books because you don't have to memorize everything. What goes around)

I am super unclear if Internet Addiction is a similar thing to TV and despite being mainstream for close on 20 years, is still culturally new so we fear it. Regardless, I know extremely not nothing about the use of mobile phones and tablets, and video-on-mobile-devices is for all intents the same as video on a TeeVee. If anything, I think I'd prefer it as you cannot just power-on then slouch and drool, but have to make choices, and don't have (as many, as irrelevant) ads.



Anyway, we also agree that the PBS Kids shows are uniformly good, and while our current little one is too small to be trusted with a device of his own, the app is usually good. Make sure you understand how to lock down the mobile device otherwise so he can only use that and whatever other apps you approve, and he'll have plenty of entertainment without the ability to get out and explore the internet generally, etc.

MANY of the PBS Kids shows are against sitting in front of the TV themselves, so have segments or themes about going to the park, exploring the woods, doing stuff with your friends, etc. Watch the shows with him enough to understand those themes, and when the WX is suitable, encourage him to go out, meet people, etc. in the same language they use. Might help.
 
Aug 30, 2008
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tn
#12
Documentaries on some scienciency bs. They either learn something or go outside. While they are inside work on catching. Put up a pull up bar. Punching bag. Books. Standing on head.
 

BoilerUP

Gunny Sergeant
Jan 16, 2011
2,687
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Clark Co., IN
#13
My boys (7 and 4) absolutely love How Its Made and Dirty Jobs.

They do watch a fair bit of turrible Netflix cartoons though, but its better than Nickelodeon and Disney/Disney Jr/Disney XD garbage that has a TON of advertisements for crappy toys.

I will say Phineas & Ferb is the best cartoon I've seen since Animaniacs, though...perfect for kids but plenty enough there for you to not slit your wrists watching as an adult.
 
Likes: tea&jam
Aug 10, 2001
4,998
404
83
Arizona, good place for me...
#14
Back when I was 4 (in 1950) we had the first TV in the neighborhood. It was an old Dumont with a green, round 8" CRT with the top and bottom masked off. It was as big as a small refrigerator laid on it side, and put off enough heat to warm the room on a cold day. I don't remember much about the sound, so it must have been OK in that department. It went out of tune about every ten minutes and sometime Dad would kick it and suddenly, Voila, a clear picture. He sent me down to the hardware store early every Saturday to get in line with the other kids and run the TV tubes through the tube tester and buy new ones when they failed the tests. This, so we could watch Milton Berle and The Great One those nights without the pop, hum/buzz, stink, smoke effects.

This was before the Crusader Rabbit, Andy's Gang, and Roy Rogers shows. This, all Saturday mornings; the rest of the time, parents held the seats of power, and their remotes were..., us kids. TV in the '50's was a joke by today's standards. TV in the 60's was more junk, lots of it canned stuff in 'living color'. Live TV was as likely to go wrong as it went right. When the current Queen of England was crowned, we waited hours while a military plane raced across the Atlantic with the pictures. Mom was enthralled. Same stuff today, only it's instantaneous.

My most prized possession was my bike, a red and chrome monster Road Master with a coaster brake that weighed almost as much as I did. I used it to ride all over Astoria Queens in a five block radius around 42nd Street and 34th avenue, from just beyond Steinway Street to Kelly Square, 31st Avenue to Northern Boulevard. The Queensboro Milk bottling plant was a block away, and we'd wake to the honking hoot of the air starters in the old C-Cab Mack chain drive delivery trucks.

Things were different then. The neighborhood was all 3 story brownstone tenements with each side of a street inhabited by a different nationality. My side of 42nd Street was the Irish, across the street were the Polacks, the Brits were around our block, the French were around the Polacks' block. Spanish (mostly Puerto Ricans) were next, then Italians, and so on. We all fought, and we all got along thick as thieves.

Milk came in glass bottles with card stock disks sealing the top under a foil wrapper. We'd cadge handfuls of the disks from the bottling plant, then go on block wide skirmish lines shooting the disks from a slingshot-like device that featured a fork style clothes pin, some string and a rubber band. Everyone would go home that night with welts on their faces. Another variation involved a length of scrap wood, a spring clothes pin, the ever present rubber band, and inch or two square torn up scraps of linoleum in place of the disks.

No discarded roll of linoleum ever made it onto the garbage trucks. There was never a shortage of scrap wood or cheap nails; all those fruit crates got busted down and put out in the trash twice a week. We'd make scooters from a crate, a 2x4, some nails and the two halves of an orphan roller skate.

Every day in Summer, that entire block of 42nd street would get the police barricades put up and the street would become a playground. The sidewalk chalk would come out and lanes with sharp turns, curves ,and straightaways would be drawn in so we kids could have roller skate races. Later in the day, it was stick ball with the pink Spauldings and mop handles. Lots of scraped knees and mild contusions those nights going back in to Mom and Dinner, with Dad away on Night Shift. The barricades came down at 5pm, so the work force could come back home and park.

We all knew when to go home because that was when the street lights went on.

A couple of times we'd go on overland bike expeditions to the World's Fair Grounds, maybe a dozen kids strong. We'd pedal up Northern Boulevard, past the Astoria Post Office, Sunnyside Rail Yard, Dejur Amsco, and the Ronzoni Spaghetti plant, eventually crossing under the Roosevelt Avenue Elevated Subway Line in Elmhurst. From there on to Corona, and finally to the Fairgrounds.

Our bikes would have those huge old canvas newspaper delivery sacks hooked around the handlebars, and we'd spend the late morning and early afternoon climbing the huge apple trees, picking the apples, and come home just in time for dinner with those paper deliver bags bulging with Macs and Granny Smiths. The whole neighborhood would smell like baking apple pies for a week after, and cinnamon became a luxury item for while (i.e., you had to pay a nickel extra). Some kids would take turns riding Pony Express on the back fender of one bike. One way or another, everybody would get there and get back. Flat got fixed on the spot, everyone had a well used tire tube patching kit in the black tin can that they came in, friction taped to the underside of their bike seat springs.

Then one day and night, Alfred Hitchcock had the entire neighborhood barricaded off, and filmed the night scenes of The Wrong Man with Henry Fonda right on our street corner (42nd and 34th) and along the street over to 43rd. Next morning it was all gone just like the traveling carnival. NOBODY watched TV that night. Nobody got to see Henry, his part wasn't filmed until sometime after midnight. I imagine Jane could have been a little kid there that day, somewhere back behind the scenes. Probably not. No self respecting movie star would live anywhere near a place like ours.

My best buds were the guys in the Cub Den. We'd all go to Ricky's apartment to watch Mickey Mouse Club after school. We were all going to be Navy Jet Fighter Pilots, just like Ricky's Dad. Once, maybe 15 or 20 years later I saw Rick on a TV game show, maybe Jeopardy or something like that. He was in his full Naval Aviator's blues. At least one of us made the dream come true.

July first was Lock Day. Each kid would take a padlock, a length of string, and a jar of Vaseline out with them that day. The padlocks would fit between the bars of the Subway ventilator grates in the sidewalk with their bottoms all gobbed up with Vaseline. It would be lowered down through the grate to pick up whatever would stick, then get retrieved. Pens, coins, and dollar bills would be harvested that day, along with a couple of pounds of rock hard discarded chewing gum, which got tossed back.

When you ran out of Vaseline, you were done until next July.

People, even back then, didn't realize that those ventilation grates were first installed back when the Subways were steam fired trains, and the tunnels had to get cleared of the smoke. There was soot, scores of years old, still clinging to the sides of the apartment buildings and brownstones, may even still to this day, dating back to probably before WWI.

Amazing what an 8-12 y/o kid could get away with back then. We'd spend hours chasing each other around in bands of kids with toy guns, usually two st9cks nailed together, playing cops n' robbers. cowboys n' indians, Commies and G-Men. Bang, bang, yer dead!

Those days, the 'bad ones' got JD (Juvenile Delinquent) Cards they had to carry around all the time. If a copper stopped them, they had to haul out that card. Nobody tried to hide it, they just did what they were told.

These days, they'd get something worse, becoming PC Pariahs with psychic scars to match, with their parents getting reamed by Batshit Snowflakes in the Principal's Office, petty little tyrants, all.

... And these days folks wonder why parents get a second job, and their kids go Full Batshit and shoot up their schools. Ever notice how most of the time, it's a public school, not a private one?

I miss it still.

Greg
 
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