Ruger Precision Rimfire

Jmp1973

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Feb 19, 2018
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Long time lurker, first time poster on this thread.

I have an RPRR that also suffers from magazine induced bullet mutilation (mostly shaved lead). I've tried many different magazines, cycling through the shells to examine the effect on the bullets. There doesn't seem to be any consistency to the issue. I've done some tape bedding, etc. I also use a 3D printed single shot sled and thst seems to help a little with consistency and accuracy. I think it desperately needs an aluminum chassis. (MDT, are you listening??) I've put the gun on the back burner for now while I play with my new Tikka T1x and wait for an aluminum chassis to drop that addresses the issues.

I did stumble upon something that may be a fix, though. As most of you know, the high capacity 10/22 mags are illegal up in Canada because they can be used on the Charger pistol. So Canadians are working on magwell adapters to use other branded mags. Most of them are 3D printed, which would allow for spec changes to account for the out of spec polymer stock we're dealing with on the RPRR. Here's one example (I saw another but can't find it at the moment)...I may order one on backorder just to see how they run.

https://spectreballistics.com/1022/51-ruger-1022-magazine-adapter.html

Anyway, just an idea... Thought I would throw it out here and then go back to lurk mode.
 

Stan628

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Oct 24, 2018
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I have done quite a bit of testing with aluminum tape and aluminum sheet metal shimming the mags, magwell, and other parts and came to several conclusions. In short, all Ruger Precision rimfire polymer chassis have defective mag wells that are too long, specifically, they have too much clearance at the front of the magwell. I also think this is 90% of the problem with all Ruger Precision Rimfire accuracy and reliability issues and that Ruger must be aware of yhe issue but does not want to fix it. I will exlain in detail below.

I found that due to the way the rounds exit the 10-22 magazine, they are off center to the left and low and point up and right as they leave the mag. This requires very specific positioning fore/aft of the magazine relative to the chamber so the bullets hit the center of the chamber. Too close and the bullet tips get shaved going in at the lip of the chamber and rear face of the barrel or jam before they can enter the chamber. A little further back and the ogive gets scraped. A bit further back (fully to the rear of the magwell where function is still 100%) everything runs smooth. If it were even further to the rear, the bullet would hit wide and high and also cause problems. Ruger knows this because they have built a bazillion Ruger 10-22s that use the magzine design. For the Ruger Precision Rimfire, fully rearward where mag release function is still 100% is where the mags are intended to be placed and the factory rear of the magwell seems positioned correctly relative to the rear block, which makes sense since that block bolts to the reciever and hold the magazine release parts and the parts are made of metal which can be easilly machined to move things to correct positional issues during prototyping before manufacture.

I also found that the way the magazine locks up, it requires a very specific fore/aft mag well size. The front of the mag needs to fit in a plastic rounded notch at the front of the magwell which is part of the chasis and there needs to be adequate clearance for the rear mag release where the pin locks in to press the mag from the rear and get the front mag button to engage the front of the magwell. If the magwell is to small fore/aft the mag either wont lock in because the front button on the mag wont clear the front notch or it wont drop free easily and disengage the rear pin of the magazine. A ploymer part requires a mold change to fix tolerance issues and polymer parts are made in large batches to keep prices down. Once you make a batch of polymer chasis, you dont want to throw them away but you also have no machining to do that you can adjust to fix tolerances.

The magazines require a small enough magwell to hold the magazine body and not allow the mags to rock fore/aft, but a very tiny amount of rocking is required to get the magazines to lock in and drop free due to mag design. With too much fore/aft magwell size, the front metal button on the magazine can slip off the polymer ledge in the magwell and get stuck. Pointing the feedlups down. This causes either the bullets to jam in below the chamber which will stop your bolt travel cold, or scrapes the hell out of the bullet tips if it does manage to clear. Unfortunately, any rearward tug on the BX15 mags causes the mags to point down and the front button to slip off the ledge. It then can get stuck pointed down. On some mags and magwells, you may notice the mag freely rocks fore/aft but wont stick in either position. With other mags and magwells, you can make the magazine stick rocked forward or stick rocked rearward. In the BX15 this is obvious as you can grab the mag and rock it easily. Its a bit tougher to do with a BX1. The natural mag insertion technique of a BX15 will have you tend to insert and sort of rock back at the bottom like an AK mag. You must then be sure the mag is pushed forward at the bottom and feed lips point up to get correct positioning. The BX1 insertion tends to make you push up at the middle or front of the mag and puts the mag in the correct orientation. You can still reach up in there and pull the nose down by pulling back and down on the front edge of the magazine but it requires a deliberate attempt to do it.

The BX15 mags are also shorter than the BX1 mags. Both the length of protrusion of the metal rear pin and front button of mag as well as the thickness of the magazine polymer body are less for the BX15 than the BX1. The BX1 uses a screw to position the front button. I found it works best when the flange behind the button is flush with the mag body. This requires placing a very thin washer shim for that bolt to rest against to get the front button to protrude more. This shim requires an ID of .340" or more and OD of .435" or less thickness in the 30 to 60 thou range to get that flange flush on a current production BX1 mag. This helps keep the front button engaged on the lip of the rounded notch at the front of the magwell. Unfortunately, BX15 mags have the feed lips, front button, and rear pin as one solid metal unit that cannot be adjusted. It is also the mag that comes with the gun so the magwell should be most reliable with a BX15, but of course it is not.

My first experiment was to shim the rear of the magwell to push the mags forward so they would not rock and would catch the front notch of the magwell, since you cant add material to the front of the whole mag body without covering the front button, you cant build up the front of the magwell notch, and you cant extend the front button to catch the lip on the BX15. Pushing the mag forward resulted in 100% lock up, propper feed lip orientation and no mag rocking, and inserting mags was easy and they dropped free when relesased. Unfortunately, the magazine was too close to the chamber. It jammed and either would not function at all or mangled the bullets horribly as they were chambered.

Next, I shimmed the front of the magwell to push the magazine to the rear. This exacerbated the front magazine button falling off the ledge at the front of the magwell, but the positioning was ideal for feeding if the magzine was held to keep the feed lips pointed up. No damage what so ever. Feeding was ultra smooth.

I also did various combinations of shimming mags at the front or back to take up space. I have come across one shimming technique on the BX15 that works OK to put the magazine in a position that stops rocking, causes minimal bullet damage, holds at the front lip of the magwell, and allows easy insertion and drop free of the magazine. It involves building up a bar of material above and flush with the front button at the front of the magazine and another bar down from the rear horizontal speed bump ledge that protrudes at the rear of the BX15. I will test it more and try making a JB weld version if the aluminum tape version pans out. I still get some bullet damage but it is minimal. If I move the mag more rearward, it slips off the magwell button ledge.

All of these issues would go away if the front wall of the magazine well was just moved about 1mm or so further to the rear. I think this is the biggest reason that people get flyers, have reliability issues, etc. Its not that the chassis has flex... it is that EVERY SINGLE RPR rimfire has a magwell that is out of spec with the front wall positioned too far forward! I also think Ruger is well aware of this.

If you pull off your reciever and look at the magwell from the top, you will see the front wall intersects a circular hole that appears to not be for anything other than a witness mark to see where the magwell is located relative to that hole. The front magwall intersects toward its front edge. The front mag wall should be pushed back to where it is flush with the middle of that round hole or possibly even slightly further.

I think Ruger should do a nationwide recall and give propper spec chassis to every RPR rimfire owner. Just a bare chasis where we can swap the buttstock, action, grip, etc. Should be sent to everyone who provides a serial number. I think it is bullshit Ruger has foisted an obviously out of spec part on the American public and expects us to send in the whole rifle and hope for the best, while the 100% biggest problem with all the rifles is CLEARLY a defective polymer part spec that they dont want to spend the money to fix because it requires a complete replacement of the chasis.

Will edit and continue later....
Hopefully someone like MDT will step in and correct the issue and give us some additional options at the same time. Then maybe Brownell's could offer us a barrelled action and we could assemble it correctly from the start. Ruger got very close with this offering but slightly missed the mark although mine shoots very well after making all of the adjustments mentioned on this forum, (use BX-1 with spring adjustment, removed trigger spring, foil taped action, confirmed torque specs on every fastener, keep the barrel clean etc.) On my particular RPRR using the BX-1 with spring adjustment is what eliminated the occasional flyer when using CCI SV's. I was considering going to the Shaw but if I can continue putting 5 shots inside a nickel at 50 yards consistently with most of them touching using cheap ammo, i'm good for now. Thank you for this detailed and informative analysis.
 
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Just-some-guy

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Dec 10, 2018
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So I've read through this entire thread and not yet come across the issue I am having with my RPRR. I have a safety lever that has a LOT of drag; when you switch it to "fire / safe" it takes more pressure than you can apply with just your thumb. It wasn't like this when I bought the rifle new as I checked them out and got the "best" one. When I got it home I took it apart like all the rest of you OCD guys, cleaned, lubed and reassembled; torqued the action screws to 31 inlbs. That's when I noticed that the safety was not snappy and easy to operate like before.

I searched the internet and found nothing on this issue. Drat, now I have to try to figure things out on my own....

So I began checking and looking and marking things and checking and measuring and could not figure out why all was good when the action screws were loose, but as soon as I snug them up, or torqued them down the safety would be practically stuck. Everything seemed normal until I tightened the action screws.

I finally think I figured out the issue; when the action screws tighten it pulls the action into the chassis. This causes the bottom of the trigger in which the notch that slips over the safety selector barrel come into contact there was not enough clearance, this was forcing the safety selector switch downward and causing it to bind in the hole in the chassis. The fit was great until tightening the action. I took a smooth round file and began to clearance the safety hole in the chassis on the bottom edge slightly; this made the safety switch have a sloppier static fit. Upon reassembling and torquing the safety switch now is a bit easier to turn and operate. I am hesitant to take off too much material at this point on the chassis, but I think if I oblonged the hole more the safety would become nicer.

I am going to try another fix option and see how that works to fix this issue. I estimate that if I build up the chassis to action interface little bit it will also fix this issue. I am planning to add a few layers . of foil tape bedding and see if this helps.

Has anyone else had this issue? If so, what did you do to fix it?

Thanks.

EDIT: So I clearanced the bottom of the safety switch hole in the chassis a tiny bit more and got the safety selector to turn satisfactorily now. I feel this is simply an issue of tolerance stacking and that the rifle was probably did not have the action screws torqued properly when I bought it.
 
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Likes: MrO17
Oct 29, 2010
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North Mississippi
I’ve had some time over the last few days to tinker around with this rifle. I’ve been happy with the gun so far but there’s always room for improvement. I bedded the front block with aluminum tape and started taking a closer look at what the rounds look like after being chambered. There is a distinct line on each chambered round. This mark is coming from the bottom of the bolt. I polished the bottom of the bolt and this decreased the mark left by the bolt. The first image is the mark left before I polished the bolt and the second is after polishing. You can see in the third image where the bolt is scrapping the bullet. Is there a way to eliminate this contact? Is this caused by the way the mag fits in the receiver?
 

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kgc54

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Jun 5, 2018
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Troy, MI
I’ve had some time over the last few days to tinker around with this rifle. I’ve been happy with the gun so far but there’s always room for improvement. I bedded the front block with aluminum tape and started taking a closer look at what the rounds look like after being chambered. There is a distinct line on each chambered round. This mark is coming from the bottom of the bolt. I polished the bottom of the bolt and this decreased the mark left by the bolt. The first image is the mark left before I polished the bolt and the second is after polishing. You can see in the third image where the bolt is scrapping the bullet. Is there a way to eliminate this contact? Is this caused by the way the mag fits in the receiver?
15 or 10 round magazine? I personally don't use 15 rounders; the range I shoot at has a 6 round max so I use my 10/22's 10 round magazine. I havent looked at the bullet after chamberin to see if there are any marks on it. I'll have to check on that and report back.
 
Oct 29, 2010
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The 15 rounders. I’d be interested to see if the 10 round mags have the same results. Maybe the the 15 round mags are putting too much upward pressure on the rounds forcing them into the bottom of the bolt. I’ll try to take some tension out of the mag spring to see if that changes anything.
 

VVhoisJohnGalt

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May 28, 2018
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Just read through a bunch of this thread. My first post on the site but I felt like the RPR rim was getting unfair treatment.
It’s a $400 gun.
I have run just over 4500 rounds through the one I bought in March. Mostly steel from 100-325yds.
Paper it shoots just under .75” with Eley Orange box at 100. And right around 1-1.1” with CCI SV. I haven’t done a single modification except taping for the mag issue.
For $400 this works as a trainer better than any other that I have tried in the price range.
It doesn’t make sense to me sinking a bunch of money into modding it...I would rather spend on ammo.
 
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kgc54

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Jun 5, 2018
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The 15 rounders. I’d be interested to see if the 10 round mags have the same results. Maybe the the 15 round mags are putting too much upward pressure on the rounds forcing them into the bottom of the bolt. I’ll try to take some tension out of the mag spring to see if that changes anything.
Tried my 10 round magazines earlier today loaded 5 rounds; chambered and ejected all 5 rounds. Did not see any damage to the bearing rings on any of the rounds. I should mention that I unwound the magazine spring a little to take the pressure off the rounds while loading. When using the 10 round magizine the spring tension is calibrated for the simi automatic 10/22 which means that the next round in the magizine must be ready to chamber then the bolt recoils back. I believe that that tension is not needed for our bolt action rifles.
 
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Islander

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Nov 2, 2018
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Just read through a bunch of this thread. My first post on the site but I felt like the RPR rim was getting unfair treatment.
It’s a $400 gun.
I have run just over 4500 rounds through the one I bought in March. Mostly steel from 100-325yds.
Paper it shoots just under .75” with Eley Orange box at 100. And right around 1-1.1” with CCI SV. I haven’t done a single modification except taping for the mag issue.
For $400 this works as a trainer better than any other that I have tried in the price range.
It doesn’t make sense to me sinking a bunch of money into modding it...I would rather spend on ammo.
Can you describe and/or show a picture of what you taped? The mag itself or the magwell of the rifle? I would like to try and see if that helps mine a bit. Thanks.
 

rimfire22lr

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Oct 24, 2018
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I bought one because it looked fun. Turns out it is fun. Who the hell cares whether it is better than a Vudoo or a CZ or a Tikka?! I have a CZ and that is fun also. This is a hobby the purposes of which are to try stuff, have fun, and spend money so your kids don't get it all when you die. I mean, sheesh.
 
Oct 29, 2010
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Got a chance to shoot the rifle yesterday after the adding the foil tape to the v block. I also was able to borrow a 10 rd mag from a friend so I wanted to see if there was a difference in group size between the 10 and 15 rounders. The wind wasn’t the best for trying out a new setup. Had about a 5mph wind with gusts over 10. My first shot was almost 2 mils high and it took me several rounds to re-zero and get comfortable behind the rifle. The middle row of targets were shot with the 10 round mag and the bottom with the 15 round. There are also 2 10 shot groups with each mag at the top right. These were the last groups of the day. I think these 2 groups tell the truth. There’s no difference between the 2 mags at 50 yards. I am not the best group shooter and the trigger needed to be adjusted a little more which I did when I got home. Next time the groups should get a little better. Overall I am very happy with the way this thing shoots for $400. Is it a sub half inch gun? No but it is still a ton of fun to shoot and we’ll worth the $.
 

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rimfire22lr

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Oct 24, 2018
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My bro and I took our RPRRs to the silhouette range today and shot the 200-meter chickens. I have an ER SHAW barrel and custom compensatory on my rifle. His rifle is stock. We had no trouble dialing out to the chickens and hitting them. As long as your wind hold was correct hits were pretty much assured. Great fun.
 

Stan628

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Oct 24, 2018
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My bro and I took our RPRRs to the silhouette range today and shot the 200-meter chickens. I have an ER SHAW barrel and custom compensatory on my rifle. His rifle is stock. We had no trouble dialing out to the chickens and hitting them. As long as your wind hold was correct hits were pretty much assured. Great fun.
I'm curious, how much elevation did you need for 200 meters?
 

Just-some-guy

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Dec 10, 2018
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My dope says 7.1 mils (24.78 moa) for my RPRR to get to 200 yards from a 50 yard zero; I don't think the quality of the rifle has a whole lot to do with bullet drop other than a slight variance in muzzle velocity due to barrel manf. quality and/ or length. Accuracy is another story; I'm consistently able to hit 3 and 4" plates at 200 in various crosswinds. Is that great, not really, but its teaching me a lot about shooting and I'm having fun.
 
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Just-some-guy

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Dec 10, 2018
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I've been purposely staying silent on this RPRR is great / garbage debate due to me being quite new to rimfire shooting for anything other than simply passing the time. However, I got the Ruger "precision" as cheaper alternative to practicing with my centerfire gun; it works pretty good for that.

It's a target rifle in my eyes, not a match gun. To my astonishment the rifle shoots pretty good so far despite my lack of knowledge, talent, and technique. I am getting an average of 3/4 minute at 50 yards with CCI SV and the accuracy seems to be improving as I learn more of the tricks of the trade. I see guys shooting locally, and posting groups on the "great equalizer" (the internet) that are legitimately 10 - 20 % better than what I'm getting; they have more invested in their optic alone than I do in my entire rig. To each their own. Is a vudoo a nice rifle, yup.

I still get a kick out of shooting a bunch and not having to sell a kidney when I get home in order to fund more components. I can afford a whole lot more ammo. since I bought the Ruger. When it's all said and done, I'm just-some-guy...
 
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rimfire22lr

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Oct 24, 2018
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I'm curious, how much elevation did you need for 200 meters?
Good question but elevation from what zero? I just mounted the scope on the rifle, zeroed it at 40 meters on the fly, then cranked it up until I was hitting the chickens at 200. I did not record anything because I knew that I would remove the scope from the RPRR when I got home. The gun and scope are not a permanent or even semi-permanent system.
 

mrt949

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Apr 25, 2018
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Called Ruger about mag problems .They sent me a new chassis fixed the problem .Extraction filed the extractor to increase the length of the hook. Using cci sv it takes 29 to 30 moa to get to 200 meters 47 moa to 300 meters . With a 50 meter zero . BUT THAT'S WITH WIND .
 
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mrt949

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Apr 25, 2018
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It's was a while back .Can't remember it was a first gen gun. They shipped it right away .also receiver a extra extractor and spring for FREE. AROUND JUNE TIME FRAME .Did not send the gun back .
 

Just-some-guy

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Dec 10, 2018
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It's was a while back .Can't remember it was a first gen gun. They shipped it right away .also receiver a extra extractor and spring for FREE. AROUND JUNE TIME FRAME .Did not send the gun back .
Is it possible to measure the spec's / dimensions of the magwell and post them? It would be nice if people could tell if they have an older or "fixed" version of the chassis; it's not really possible to go by sale date due to the possibility of old stock on hand. I bought mine a couple of weeks ago, it could be a newer generation, or not.

I must say, I do not have any feeding issues or accuracy issues currently, but I ditched the 15rd mag right away and used Ruger factory 10 rounders. I also put a layer of aluminum tape in the front and rear face of the magwell just for good measure and tighten tolerances a tad.

Maybe post the dimensions of magwell front to back, and side to side.

Thank you.
 

mrt949

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Apr 25, 2018
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It might have something to do with the bedding block and the chassis .Stacking of tolerances .
All i know it solved my ISSUES LOL
 

Just-some-guy

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Dec 10, 2018
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Would probably be helpful if you posted the magwell spec's on an updated chassis for those trying to determine if that is their issue.
It might have something to do with the bedding block and the chassis .Stacking of tolerances .
All i know it solved my ISSUES LOL
 
Sep 4, 2006
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GrinBin
Hello all! Great info and work on this rifle! I am looking for the proper ring height for my RPRimfire. I am keepomg the stock 30 moa rail and putting a Vortex Diamondback 4-16x44 FFP on it. Anyone able to give best height of rings to get it close to barrel without touching? Thanks for any and all help!
Cheers!
 

Maxim0

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Sep 28, 2018
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Hello all! Great info and work on this rifle! I am looking for the proper ring height for my RPRimfire. I am keepomg the stock 30 moa rail and putting a Vortex Diamondback 4-16x44 FFP on it. Anyone able to give best height of rings to get it close to barrel without touching? Thanks for any and all help!
Cheers!
I just Purchased the same with the one inch high rings by instruction of the manufacturer. I will Update on fit when the scope and rings arrive
 
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WuYen

The riddle of steel...
May 27, 2017
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SoCal
I have done quite a bit of testing with aluminum tape and aluminum sheet metal shimming the mags, magwell, and other parts and came to several conclusions. In short, all Ruger Precision rimfire polymer chassis have defective mag wells that are too long, specifically, they have too much clearance at the front of the magwell. I also think this is 90% of the problem with all Ruger Precision Rimfire accuracy and reliability issues and that Ruger must be aware of yhe issue but does not want to fix it. I will exlain in detail below.

I found that due to the way the rounds exit the 10-22 magazine, they are off center to the left and low and point up and right as they leave the mag. This requires very specific positioning fore/aft of the magazine relative to the chamber so the bullets hit the center of the chamber. Too close and the bullet tips get shaved going in at the lip of the chamber and rear face of the barrel or jam before they can enter the chamber. A little further back and the ogive gets scraped. A bit further back (fully to the rear of the magwell where function is still 100%) everything runs smooth. If it were even further to the rear, the bullet would hit wide and high and also cause problems. Ruger knows this because they have built a bazillion Ruger 10-22s that use the magzine design. For the Ruger Precision Rimfire, fully rearward where mag release function is still 100% is where the mags are intended to be placed and the factory rear of the magwell seems positioned correctly relative to the rear block, which makes sense since that block bolts to the reciever and hold the magazine release parts and the parts are made of metal which can be easilly machined to move things to correct positional issues during prototyping before manufacture.

I also found that the way the magazine locks up, it requires a very specific fore/aft mag well size. The front of the mag needs to fit in a plastic rounded notch at the front of the magwell which is part of the chasis and there needs to be adequate clearance for the rear mag release where the pin locks in to press the mag from the rear and get the front mag button to engage the front of the magwell. If the magwell is to small fore/aft the mag either wont lock in because the front button on the mag wont clear the front notch or it wont drop free easily and disengage the rear pin of the magazine. A ploymer part requires a mold change to fix tolerance issues and polymer parts are made in large batches to keep prices down. Once you make a batch of polymer chasis, you dont want to throw them away but you also have no machining to do that you can adjust to fix tolerances.

The magazines require a small enough magwell to hold the magazine body and not allow the mags to rock fore/aft, but a very tiny amount of rocking is required to get the magazines to lock in and drop free due to mag design. With too much fore/aft magwell size, the front metal button on the magazine can slip off the polymer ledge in the magwell and get stuck. Pointing the feedlups down. This causes either the bullets to jam in below the chamber which will stop your bolt travel cold, or scrapes the hell out of the bullet tips if it does manage to clear. Unfortunately, any rearward tug on the BX15 mags causes the mags to point down and the front button to slip off the ledge. It then can get stuck pointed down. On some mags and magwells, you may notice the mag freely rocks fore/aft but wont stick in either position. With other mags and magwells, you can make the magazine stick rocked forward or stick rocked rearward. In the BX15 this is obvious as you can grab the mag and rock it easily. Its a bit tougher to do with a BX1. The natural mag insertion technique of a BX15 will have you tend to insert and sort of rock back at the bottom like an AK mag. You must then be sure the mag is pushed forward at the bottom and feed lips point up to get correct positioning. The BX1 insertion tends to make you push up at the middle or front of the mag and puts the mag in the correct orientation. You can still reach up in there and pull the nose down by pulling back and down on the front edge of the magazine but it requires a deliberate attempt to do it.

The BX15 mags are also shorter than the BX1 mags. Both the length of protrusion of the metal rear pin and front button of mag as well as the thickness of the magazine polymer body are less for the BX15 than the BX1. The BX1 uses a screw to position the front button. I found it works best when the flange behind the button is flush with the mag body. This requires placing a very thin washer shim for that bolt to rest against to get the front button to protrude more. This shim requires an ID of .340" or more and OD of .435" or less thickness in the 30 to 60 thou range to get that flange flush on a current production BX1 mag. This helps keep the front button engaged on the lip of the rounded notch at the front of the magwell. Unfortunately, BX15 mags have the feed lips, front button, and rear pin as one solid metal unit that cannot be adjusted. It is also the mag that comes with the gun so the magwell should be most reliable with a BX15, but of course it is not.

My first experiment was to shim the rear of the magwell to push the mags forward so they would not rock and would catch the front notch of the magwell, since you cant add material to the front of the whole mag body without covering the front button, you cant build up the front of the magwell notch, and you cant extend the front button to catch the lip on the BX15. Pushing the mag forward resulted in 100% lock up, propper feed lip orientation and no mag rocking, and inserting mags was easy and they dropped free when relesased. Unfortunately, the magazine was too close to the chamber. It jammed and either would not function at all or mangled the bullets horribly as they were chambered.

Next, I shimmed the front of the magwell to push the magazine to the rear. This exacerbated the front magazine button falling off the ledge at the front of the magwell, but the positioning was ideal for feeding if the magzine was held to keep the feed lips pointed up. No damage what so ever. Feeding was ultra smooth.

I also did various combinations of shimming mags at the front or back to take up space. I have come across one shimming technique on the BX15 that works OK to put the magazine in a position that stops rocking, causes minimal bullet damage, holds at the front lip of the magwell, and allows easy insertion and drop free of the magazine. It involves building up a bar of material above and flush with the front button at the front of the magazine and another bar down from the rear horizontal speed bump ledge that protrudes at the rear of the BX15. I will test it more and try making a JB weld version if the aluminum tape version pans out. I still get some bullet damage but it is minimal. If I move the mag more rearward, it slips off the magwell button ledge.

All of these issues would go away if the front wall of the magazine well was just moved about 1mm or so further to the rear. I think this is the biggest reason that people get flyers, have reliability issues, etc. Its not that the chassis has flex... it is that EVERY SINGLE RPR rimfire has a magwell that is out of spec with the front wall positioned too far forward! I also think Ruger is well aware of this.

If you pull off your reciever and look at the magwell from the top, you will see the front wall intersects a circular hole that appears to not be for anything other than a witness mark to see where the magwell is located relative to that hole. The front magwall intersects toward its front edge. The front mag wall should be pushed back to where it is flush with the middle of that round hole or possibly even slightly further.

I think Ruger should do a nationwide recall and give propper spec chassis to every RPR rimfire owner. Just a bare chasis where we can swap the buttstock, action, grip, etc. Should be sent to everyone who provides a serial number. I think it is bullshit Ruger has foisted an obviously out of spec part on the American public and expects us to send in the whole rifle and hope for the best, while the 100% biggest problem with all the rifles is CLEARLY a defective polymer part spec that they dont want to spend the money to fix because it requires a complete replacement of the chasis.

Will edit and continue later....
It’s blatantly obvious. How Ruger let this rifle go out like this is beyond me. Single feeding works but it’s time consuming and you break your position. Excellent post.
 

kgc54

New Hide Member
Jun 5, 2018
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Troy, MI
It’s blatantly obvious. How Ruger let this rifle go out like this is beyond me. Single feeding works but it’s time consuming and you break your position. Excellent post.
You have to keep in mind Ruger is using the same polymer stocks in all three rimfire version of their rifles (.17, .22LR and .22 Magnum). This saves on production costs, and we all know that that Ruger as well as any other wepons manufacturer are expected at the end of the quarter to turn a profit. If you know this when you purchase the rifle its short comings are not as much of a surprise.

I have a 10/22 housed in a Nordic Component AR-22 chassis. I tossed the stock for my RAR if favor of the MDT LSS-22 and haven't regretted the decision. I'm ever so slowly getting the RPRR set up to my likings.It is all about what shooting and enjoying what you shoot.
 
Dec 10, 2018
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Great video Elfster. It is clear that accuracy of the 22lr is falling apart at 300 yds; I am really curious how a "better" / more expensive gun shooting similar ammo. would perform at that distance.
 
Jan 6, 2019
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I've learned a lot reading this thread. I love this little rifle. There are people here far more scientific than I am. I'd like to share my experience with my RPR

I'm shooting golf balls at 220yds consistently. Depending on wind it may take 2-4 shots as I dance just around it.
At 190yds I'm just breaking clay pigeon pieces smaller and smaller until I can't see them anymore.

And I've done NOTHING to the rifle. I purchased it late November.
Stock magazine. (I intend to get a 10 round one.)
I've NOT bedded the action, but I'm going to.
And I've committed the most evil of all .22 sins.... I'm using HV ammo! noes!!!!
And I'm not even using a bag in the rear, just my shoulder. (I've since purchased a monopod for Xmas, and it feels like cheating.)
I bore snake it... when I feel like it. I'm prbly over 2000 rounds easily.

I don't know if I've got the mystical unicorn edition, but it works. I'm zeroed for 100yds. I used 1.5mil hold under for 50yds and will hit dum dum lollypops all day.

This is all before I start testing with expensive ammo. Right now its so freaking cold and windy its pointless. But I will post a 6x5 when it gets warmer. I'm looking for consistency 100yds and beyond. I've had ammo at 50yds look like one hole, and fall apart at 100yds like it was thrown by my grandmother...with her off hand. I really don't care about 50yd groupings if I intend to always shoot further, but I test anyway.

Current front runner ammo:
CCI Mini-Mag High Velocity 22 Long Rifle Ammo 40 Grain Copper Plated Round Nose (1235 fps)

But... But Gorilla... the speed of sound .... the sonic barrier..... copper.... Armageddon!
Yes, yes I know. This is the ammo of Satan. I'm dealing in the black arts, and this is a sure fire way for my cat to get pregnant. Even though I don't own a cat! But its consistent at longer ranges.

Current optic:
Athlon Optics , Talos 6-24 x 50 Second Focal Plane (SFP) 1" Tube, Illuminated ATMR1 MIL Reticle

But.. but.. Gorilla, you could have got a much better <insert brand here> optic....
I have two kids, one in college. I'm lucky I can afford the electricity to post this message! This scope is fabulous and makes wind adjustments a dream.

All that said, I think most of you guys are nuts, and I love it! You take it to a whole new level, and make me want to as well. You are all like enablers of accuracy. I might even write down the humidity levels in my range book from now on. I'm actually really excited to bed teh action and change the mag.

I'm also going to see if my son can get a video of us hitting the golf balls at 220. We do this all the time, every time we go to the range.
 
Likes: jrassy
Jan 6, 2019
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Oh, and as far as ejection issues... yeah... I call that Winchester ammo! Its the ONLY one that has so far given me ejection issues. Multiple kinds of Winchester ammo! I can safely say I won't be buying any more.