Ruger Precision Rimfire

#5
I’m just hoping it shoots better than all 3 of my Ruger rimfires.

I would like to get a Vudoo, but it’s just out of my budget.


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plong

Gunny Sergeant
#8
Honestly, it looks like a plastic POS to me... I really wanted to like the the Ruger American when I first started looking for a bolt action rimfire, but the sloppy machining was a total turn-off. I'd take a Savage Mk II/93 over anything from Ruger any day. As far as I'm concerned: CZ for a budget rimfire; Annie, or, better yet: Vudoo if you want the best...
 

TimK

Gunny Sergeant
#11
The market needs a lower cost option. I hope they shoot well. There are a lot of features to like at the price point. LOP goes down to 12". It could be an option for a youth rifle, something I've found to be a little hard to come by in this market segment.

At only 6.8#, I'd need to mount a brick to it to get it up to the weight I prefer, though! Props to Ruger for seeing the need and trying to fill it.
 
#13
They'll no doubt sell a bunch of them to guys hoping for something with better accuracy than they're likely to provide - at least, that's my rather pessimistic first opinion. I'd love to be proven wrong...
 

Greg Langelius *

Resident Elder Fart
#14
I looked the site info over, watched the video, and was impressed. The product is being offered as an RPR-centric trainer, and has both innovation and utility that I think I'd like. Visibly absent was any clear evidence of accuracy, just some dings and off-camera acclamations 'Hit...'.

I reserve judgement until several range reports wander in, but I await those range reports eagerly.

I have been doing my more serious rimfire training with a bare bones Savage MKII, which leaves a bit to be desired from the ergonomics standpoint, in addition to several other missing features. As long as this Ruger offering does not exhibit any glaring deficits or malfunctions, I'm likely candidate for acquiring one.

Greg
 
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#15
I guess I am the outlier

While not perfect and will never compare to a vudoo, CZ in a KRG or XLR chassis, Annie, or Sako. It does fill a roll

For a grand slam it needed to be aluminum chassis that takes AR buttstocks and has the ability to take 10-22 barrels like (Kidd or Lilja) but this rifle brings a lot for the price.

$400.00 street price (at sportmanoutdoorsuperstore)
You get
Enlarged bolt knob
threaded 1/2-28 barrel
Free floated barrel
AR grip and safety (hopefully interchangeable)
10-22 mag compatibility (I prefer them to my CZ 455 mags and have a bunch)
Adjustable LOP and comb height (12" to 15.5" LOP and the Crickett 22lr is 12.25" LOP so this should work for my kids)
Bolt throw is ~60-70*
Replaceable barrel (needs an AR barrel wrench and go no-go gauges).

All in all not bad for the price. Even if you started with a RAR and added the other stuff if would be more expensive than the RAR precision trainer.


I have been making it a goal to get my kids out shooting at least 3 times a month (been using my heavily modified 10-22 in a chassis that I can make short enough for them). If I am able to pick one of these up this year that would be awesome. It would slow the kids down and help them take more time with their shots ;) they seem to love burning through ammo on the 10-22 especially with reactive targets.
 
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308pirate

Gunny Sergeant
#16
Some of you people need some perspective.

Its MSRP is less than $550. It's not aimed at people who buy Vudoos, Anschutz, or the like.

And I personally will reserve judgement about its "flimsy" chassis and "poor accuracy" until people actually use them and publish what they find.
 

plong

Gunny Sergeant
#17
The American Rimfire I tested had the sloppiest bolt to action interface of any rifle I've ever handled, regardless of price. It really was truly awful; still say I'd take a Savage rimfire over anything from Ruger, YMMV, of course...
 

goosed

Sergeant of the Hide
#18
It's clear the chassis took some cost cutting blows. I get the strategy as they are putting this in the same price range as the 455 tacticool and MKII TRR-SR. To that end it brings some unique features to the segment.

Personally though... this would have been a lot more interesting to me if they had kept the original straight recoil path RPR chassis. Being able to swap to the PRS or similar style butt stock is also a feature that would have added quite a bit of value and interest to me.

Yet I'm not willing to write it off just yet. I do love my Annie's, but they just have a very distinct 22 feel that I don't like in a trainer. In fact every rimfire I've owned other than the 40x, and clones, feels distinctly like a 22. So I'm particularly interested if the longer bolt throw option on this Ruger will actually make a difference in making it feel like a center fire. If the bolt throw actually feels similar enough to it's big brother that alone will be enough to get it added to my stable without hesitation.
 

jbell

Gunny Sergeant
#19
Its definitely not for me, but I think its cool none the less. I would like to know how the barrel attaches. Honestly IMO for the price it cant compete with a bone stock CZ455. I would bet the accuracy would be about the same, but for like $450 for a new barrel and a bedding job you can have a 455 in the game.
 
#20
I think I would rather have the RAR Target and have a loggerhead installed in the laminate stock.

One major plus with the Ruger is the 10/22 magazine. Good capacity, small size, and cheap and easy to acquire. Hard to argue their is another better.

Knowing how Ruger has pretty much cheapened everthing they do. Will be a shocker this new one will be worth a crap. The RAR Target was a staggering surprise. And no shocker there...it needed work.
 
#21
Would I ever want one of these as my personal rig? No but that is just me and the markets in this game don’t revolve around to just what I like. I personally don’t care for a rifle that has the exact same size, weight, mags etc as a centerfire. After all I’m strictly a rimfire guy so centerfire doesn’t even make it on my list. For me the perfect rimfire is the one that is most accurate, consistent, and with flawless function in every way but you have the other end of the spectrum. You have some that like exactly what I do, some that want an exact clone to a centerfire rig that eats 22 lr, some that want a chassis, some that are on a specific budget but want something also in particular. This rifle here gets a guy/gal into a chassis style build without the cost. If these take off the aftermarket will be there to tailor them for most needs in this style of configuration. How many times have we all seen a good thing with time turn bad or a bad thing given time turn out to be good? Best thing we can do is give it time and see where goes :). I’m sure I’ll grab one just to see what I can do with it.
 
#22
I don't know why the stock is different? I guess it has to be cost?

I was hoping that they were going to bring out a 22lr barrel and bolt for the real RPR. With this out, that means that they won't do that now, and no one else will. I'd rather spend $550 on a barrel and bolt for the RPR than a whole new rifle.
 
#23
just seen the RPRR. been out of the posting in the forum game for awhile, but this one drew me out of the shadows....

ok for years so many of us was wanting manufacturers to come out with something like this, and here it is. not an unbaised shooting review out there yet, and it's being torn apart.

seeing how ruger has actually listened to the market and changed appropriately to meet or exceed what the market is demanding, i'll bet there will be a version 2 with most of the gripes being solved. as they have with almost all their rim and centerfires.

having at one time being a savage guy, I've seen where they have tried too but fall short. having a savage(s), CZ and RAR, and thousands of rounds of different ammo through each at 25-425 yards i'd say the regular RAR is so close to the CZ in accuracy that the RAR is a bargain for less $ with comparable accuracy. both leaving the savage behind. not in my opinion, but by what groups are printed on paper straight out of the box.

having said that (and probably going to get flamed for it), ruger steps it up a notch by the 30moa base, and actual adjustment to simulate a short action bolt throw and a real removeable bolt knob, and replaceable AR grip to whatever you wish, reversible AR style safety. headspacing / barrel adjustments with AR tools, completely adjustable LOP, Check weld, and butt plate. trigger adjustments without taking the rifle apart. Quick release cups. aluminum free float hand guard (i'm assuming can be replaced with similar / different handguards that fit AR platforms if it uses AR tools). threaded barrel. a serviceable trigger group.

ok stock is "glass filled nylon" and I see no mention of the bedding blocks that the RAR has or any type of 1 piece bedding block. I hope indeed they carried those blocks over to the RPRR, but even if not so it's still quite a decent rig with a street price that'll probably be under $500.00, and with the features already present is worth every cent. and i'm sure we all as rimfire tinkerers will take the good ol dremmel and epoxy to make it happen.

when you look at the exploded view of the chassis in the manual, it is only as long as the front of the receiver. so how much flex is it actually going to have? .....unknown, but having it that short and the relatively no recoil of .22lr certainly does help. experimenting with chopping tupperware stocks previously on centerfires and rimfires alike have shown some gains in stiffness when shooting off of a bipod as there's less area to cause and amplify the flex. from an engineering standpoint perhaps this design negates the need for an aluminum chassis, though I would prefer it aluminum or an aluminum insert for piece of mind.

Still as it sits I believe it to be a homerun vs. offering from other mainstream MFRs. Familiarity to the wildly popular RPR (built around / off of an economy rifle receiver). no doubt when feedback trickles back in to ruger from the market, we'll see how they react. they've changed their EDC pistols American centerfires and rimfires to meet that feedback, I have no doubt they'll do the same with this if there are shortcomings that are proofed out. then it'll be homerun that turns into a grand slam.

at a probably under $500 street price with the features built in as is there's nothing that can come close to it out of the box in that price range when you look at it objectively....that is if it performs as well as the RAR does.

the market will dictate change....and mainstream MFRs will follow suit as they did with the intro of the RPR, and we'll see factory offerings in chassis and similar features. it happened with the others catching up to ruger's precision centerfire rifle - savage stealth, winch XPC, Howa HCR, Mossberg MVP LC, etc, etc, etc, trying to make up ground. most of which is the same ol' candybar in a new wrapper.

and then there will be the "aftermarket" accessories and tweaks....
 
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#24
Don't get me wrong here, I like the whole concept of this rifle, I'm glad Ruger brought it out and I have high hopes for it! The receiver will flex or it won't.

But it needs to be as accurate as anything in it's class and there can't be POI shifts, or it will be a let down, that's all.

Again, hopefully it'll be a great performer.
 

308pirate

Gunny Sergeant
#26
Top Predator, outstanding post. The overwhelmingly critical reaction, without even ever holding this rifle let along shooting it, is absolutely ridiculous. Made all the more ridiculous because none of the critics could engineer, design and build a rifle from nothing if their lives depended on it.

Benefit of the doubt to Ruger.
 

RAVAGE88

Vudoo, Head Skunk
#27
Top Predator, outstanding post. The overwhelmingly critical reaction, without even ever holding this rifle let along shooting it, is absolutely ridiculous. Made all the more ridiculous because none of the critics could engineer, design and build a rifle from nothing if their lives depended on it.

Benefit of the doubt to Ruger.
^^^^THIS.

What we're "watching" happen in the rimfire segment of the market is pretty awesome. I'm intrigued by what Ruger and Tikka are doing, as it's approaching an across-the-board response to exactly what the shooting community has demanded. Being involved in the industry at a much deeper level than Vudoo, the challenges to accomplish what Ruger and Tikka have pulled off within a stringent price point isn't easy. Where the really cool things start to happen after their product introductions is how the aftermarket supports what they do. This fuels competition amongst the OEMs and the beneficiaries are all of you guys....

MB
 

jbell

Gunny Sergeant
#28
^^^^THIS.

What we're "watching" happen in the rimfire segment of the market is pretty awesome. I'm intrigued by what Ruger and Tikka are doing, as it's approaching an across-the-board response to exactly what the shooting community has demanded. Being involved in the industry at a much deeper level than Vudoo, the challenges to accomplish what Ruger and Tikka have pulled off within a stringent price point isn't easy. Where the really cool things start to happen after their product introductions is how the aftermarket supports what they do. This fuels competition amongst the OEMs and the beneficiaries are all of you guys....

MB
spot on guys
 

NOMAD

Team Blaster Shooter
#29
I can't wait to get my hands on one and try it out just to see how well they shoot. Its got big shoes to fill because. The 10/22, CZ455 and a few others like the RPR will all fall in the same class for these 22 type of competition. If it doesn't make the mark it could quickly get a bad rap.

Looking forward to seeing what it can do.
 
#31
I see this as a very positive step. A well known respected mfg tailoring a 22 lr for the precision rimfire market including PRS rimfire matches, 22lr trainer applications, youth trainer uses, and even preppers. When I went looking for a rimfire PRS rifle last year I found that really only CZ, Savage MkII and Ruger 10/22 were viable candidates and NONE filled the bill totally. For PRS you need long range, and enough accuracy a good trigger and large cap mags. CZ was accurate but to be really accurate needed a bbl upgrade. Its trigger was wonky and when adjusted to match levels would sometimes allow the bolt to come all the way out when rapidly cycling the action. The Savage had a nice trigger and ok accuracy but it needed larger capacity mags and while 10rd mags are out there they do not feed as well as the factory 5ers. The 10/22 was fast but not as accurate. It had large cap mags that work but needed trigger, bbl and other mods to really be a contender. None of them had a 30 MOA base but at least they were out there to be added on. Other great rifles such as the Anchutz, the old Win 52's or the nice old Remington 541's while supremely accurate lacked the necessary accessories such as the 30moa base, the bipod mounts and/or the large cap mags. Without all of these you were playing with one strike (or two against you). So, every off the shelf option was a compromise of some sort. What I saw was that most serious players were using one of those three options and modding them to meet their needs as best they could and supplementing the lack of inherent accuracy with extremely high quality optics. Now here comes Ruger with a product that offers: Adjustable trigger, 30MOA base, free floated bbl, pistol grip chassis with adjustable ergonomics. And a bbl which can be replaced using tools that any AR15 builder will already have. A hammer forged bbl as well. It might not be tack driver accurate, but how do we know it is not? And if it is at least on par with a well tuned CZ then it will certainly be accurate enough for all of the applications listed above. Until, I see it, hold it, and judge the fit and finish and shoot it or see the results of others with it, I choose to reserve judgment. However, I will be shocked if it is not a step forward over my barely adequate Savage. The Tikka while more traditional is another worthy addition but I am expecting a lag before the necessary accessories become available. I had my hands on a Anschutz mod 54 sporter this weekend and was thinking "What can I use this for?". It would be accurate no doubt and I could hunt and plink with it but nobody make 15 or 20 rd mags for it and I doubt I could find a 30 MOA base without having it custom made. Tough to spend three times the money on a compromise when the Ruger looks to have all the bases covered. They named it the "Precision" rimfire rifle, not the "Adequately Accurate" rimfire rifle. Let's see if it can live up to its name?

Irish
 
#33
I picked one up today and went straight to the range, tried about 5 kinds of ammo and found two that show some potential.
Shot these groups at 50 yards only modification was a can. The Edge is 9 shots with #10 being a flyer. The group above left of it is 5 rounds measures about the same as the 9 round group. The Norma is a 5 round group. Awesome little gun!

 
#35
I picked one up today and went straight to the range, tried about 5 kinds of ammo and found two that show some potential.
Shot these groups at 50 yards only modification was a can. The Edge is 9 shots with #10 being a flyer. The group above left of it is 5 rounds measures about the same as the 9 round group. The Norma is a 5 round group. Awesome little gun!

Do you have any CCI standard velocity you can try? I have quite a few of these bricks.


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goosed

Sergeant of the Hide
#38
There is one on GB right now.

Ruger does it right. By the time the public has any info on new products, that product is usually already on the way to distributors.
 

308pirate

Gunny Sergeant
#43
If those are edge to edge measurements, those groups are very nice center to center. I can only imagine what it would do with ammo it really likes.

Maybe the bashers ought to line up at the crow buffet. I hear there's humble pie for dessert.
 
#44
If those are edge to edge measurements, those groups are very nice center to center. I can only imagine what it would do with ammo it really likes.

Maybe the bashers ought to line up at the crow buffet. I hear there's humble pie for dessert.
Ha, NOT very observant are you, you likes you some crow pie I bet, note the vertical stringing on almost every group - likely from receiver flex.
 
#45
Out of 9 groups with 3 different types of ammo 3 had vertical stringing. One of those is an off the shelf 7c per round bullet. I just expected so much more out of a $400 rifle when it went to the range for the 1st time. :rolleyes: I guess he should just toss it into the plastic recycle bin.

As for me I look at this 1st range report as very encouraging. Like all 22's a little more load development with a few other types of ammo could reveal a real winner, even for a rifle at 3 times the cost. Really interested to see what SK Rifle match, Wolf Match Plus or Lapua Center X will look like. Now I'm intrigued. The Ruger booth at SHOT will definitely be one of my 1st stops.
 

308pirate

Gunny Sergeant
#46
Ha, NOT very observant are you, you likes you some crow pie I bet, note the vertical stringing on almost every group - likely from receiver flex.
Barrel vibration, of which receiver flex is one component, has multiple degrees of freedom. Which means that almost perfectly vertical stringing like what those targets show is most likely ammo related.

I'm more observant than you think.
 
#47
How is the chassis feel? I know it is made of plastic (but it is a very decent price).

I wonder if any of the stringing could be chassis related - some stiffening work with arrow shafts or something could maybe help.
 
#49
Barrel vibration, of which receiver flex is one component, has multiple degrees of freedom. Which means that almost perfectly vertical stringing like what those targets show is most likely ammo related.

I'm more observant than you think.
Sounds bombastically fancy, but it can simply be flex from weighing down the rifle differently from shot to shot.

I have no problem admitting I'm right or wrong, lol. I was mostly seeing what it's like to act like you do.

POI shifting from frame flexing will be a trend or it won't. let's hope for the best. I'm not familiar with composites and there stiffness ratings but I'll put more confidence in steel or aluminum off the top of my head if higher precision is top priority. Although the worst shifting I've experienced was with a AR7 copy with a super thin aluminum frame.

It turns out a friend is interested in buying one, if so I'll do some testing of my own.

Actually if someone who owns one could try to induce flex "on purpose" that would help solve doubts either way. Shoot some groups with as little interaction on the rifle as possible, some more with normal interaction, and push down harder on the rifle for more groups.

For what this rifle costs, with the groups already shown and the ammo used, it's not bad, just as long as it feeds and ejects well.
 
#50
I've noted a trend on all Rimfire boards... Everyone seems to what to hate Rugers attempts at a precision rimfire, even thought there has been plenty of targets posted that clearly show there barrels can go toe to toe with everyone favorite darling the CZ. My Ruger Target shot great out of the box. and the Ruger Prevision looks like it is doing the same.

Few of us can or will drop $2-$3K on a Rimfire bolt gun and another $1K on a scope. Especially when there are options like Ruger out there. And Just my Humble opinion, worth what you paid for it, but the Ruger Magazine is the Number 1 feed system out there.Based on performance and cost.