Recommend books

Jan 2, 2009
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Akron Ohio Summit
#1
I like reading Forstcher, A.American, Janet Evonovich ( don’t judge) Lawrence sanders, Jeffery Deaver, Jeffery beaver. Have you read any authors and no of other similar authors to recommend
 

sirhrmechanic

Command Sgt. Major
#2
^^^ There are a couple of good book threads in Snipers Hide Movie Theater.... Suggest (for more serious responses and thread longevity) that we move this over there.

Forstchen (I assume you have a typo there) is pretty good. He has become a bit of a historical fiction writer. If you like his stuff, you will love the classic Kenneth Roberts books, especially Northwest Passage and Arundel.

Tucker301 feel like moving this over? Has the makings of a great thread.

Cheers,

Sirhr
 

Greg Langelius *

Resident Elder Fart
Aug 10, 2001
4,361
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Arizona, good place for me...
#5
I will be reading Indeh, both novels, by Eve Ball, and the one by Ethan Hawke (yes, that Ethan Hawke...), in an effort to get a better insight into Cochise, the Apache Wars, and the late 19th century history of my own local area; and the The Three Day Road, about the background of the character as the top Canadian sniper in WWI and the influence of his Native American history on his role.

In part inspired by the legend of Francis Pegahmagabow, the great Indian sniper of World War I, Three-Day Road is an impeccably researched and beautifully written story that offers a searing reminder about the cost of war.
Greg
 
Apr 17, 2010
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Astoria, Or.
#13
We all probably have read something by Stephen Hunter featuring Bob Lee Swagger but I read virtually everything he has written up through the last couple of years. "Dirty White Boys" is actually my favorite by Hunter. It's the best crime novel ever IMHO.
 
Likes: worvin

hermosabeach

Confused Coffee Drinker
Feb 13, 2012
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#14
This one is an excellent read... especially for those who own guns but don't quite get gun ownership

It is dated as it was written largely before the Internet and Cell Phones

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Unintended_Consequences_(novel)

Unintended Consequences is a novel by John Ross, first published in 1996 by Accurate Press.[SUP][1][/SUP] The story chronicles the history of the gun culture, gun rights, and gun control in the United States from the early 1900s through the late 1990s. Although clearly a work of fiction, the story is heavily laced with historical fact, including historical figures who play minor supporting roles. The protagonist is very active in competitive shooting sports, as is the author; so unusually detailed and intricate facts, figures and explanations of firearms-related topics, ornament the narrative and drive the plot.


While out of print, there are many digital copies on the interweb.....
 

fx77

Sergeant
Nov 29, 2005
900
12
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ny state
#17
ARTEMIS...by the author of THE MARTIAN..about a mafia type group, mrrder etc on a colony on the moon (named Artemis)...if U like Hokey SciFi..
 
Apr 9, 2006
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Littleton, Colorado
#18
My 2 cents:

As much as I loved the Vince Flynn books, I think Brad Taylor's Pike Logan series is better. Brad Thor books rank third in my mind. I didn't discover Brad Taylor until just recently and I don't know how I overlooked such a good writer that also gets all the gun stuff right.

Avoid Ben Coes if you like technical accuracy. The guy is a complete idiot that does zero research for his novels.

Unintended Consequences by John Ross is a must read for any gun geek.

Stephen Hunter's Swagger books are good, but I think his earlier works are better than the later stuff. (I haven't read G-man yet.)
 

TheGerman

Oberleutnant
Jan 25, 2010
3,041
151
63
Out West
#20
On my table right now:

Attacks - Erwin Rommel (probably the 7th time Ive read it)
Into Infamy - Joe Chamblin (he's a Hider, got an autographed copy from him)
Fry the Brain - John West (skip the 'introduction to firearms' parts early on; get into the theory of how different types of engagements are fought and why)
Be an Expert with Map and Compass - Bjorn Kjellestrom (realized a while ago that I totally fucking suck at LANDNAV and rely on GPS way too much)
The Forgotten Solider - Guy Sajer
Knights Cross - Sepp Allerberger (managed to get it autographed before he died as well as a picture of him I have in my office). I also used his 'floating umbrella' camouflage trick

eta - Everyone needs to read 'War of the Rats' (none of this Enemy at the Gates bullshit) as well as 'A Rifleman went to war'. Should be required SH reading before you can post or something.
 
Likes: jrassy

sirhrmechanic

Command Sgt. Major
#21
No Easy Day and Inside Delta Force are both excellent if youre into military novels
Neither are novels... both are non-fiction. And, interestingly, both authors are pariahs in their communities as a result. What do I know... I was in marketing.

Great book for those interested in WW2 is Bomber Harris by Dudley Saward. Very detailed information on the WW2 air assault on Germany. Also some really interesting information on very early combined operations in the sandbox... c. 1920's. I think of it as a companion piece to the books on Curtis LeMay. They were soul-mates, if not acquaintances. Harris was a hard-a$$ by any definition. LeMay got the press. Harris got the blame.

For kilo... some better books on the communities are Beckwith's "Delta Force" about the formation. And Brave Men Dark Waters about the early days of the teams.

German... Into Infamy is a worthwhile read. No... better than that. A read almost required by us here on SH. Like you, I got to know the author here on SH and have a personal copy of his book. He got fully-exonerated earlier this year and I posted the finding on his behalf. A fantastic outcome for a guy who totally didn't deserve the screwing he got at the hands of the turd-burglars that infested the White House and Pentagon for much of the last decade. His getting cleared, while it didn't resurrect his great career.... at least proved he was right. Great guy!

Sajer's book is great, too.

Another interesting book, hard to find in CONUS is "The Quiet Soldier" by Adam Ballinger. About selection into the 21 SAS, their territorials regiment. Not as well known as the 22nd... but just as bada**.. Interesting guys.

Cheers,

Sirhr
 
Dec 7, 2017
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#22
Neither are novels... both are non-fiction. And, interestingly, both authors are pariahs in their communities as a result. What do I know... I was in marketing.

Great book for those interested in WW2 is Bomber Harris by Dudley Saward. Very detailed information on the WW2 air assault on Germany. Also some really interesting information on very early combined operations in the sandbox... c. 1920's. I think of it as a companion piece to the books on Curtis LeMay. They were soul-mates, if not acquaintances. Harris was a hard-a$$ by any definition. LeMay got the press. Harris got the blame.

For kilo... some better books on the communities are Beckwith's "Delta Force" about the formation. And Brave Men Dark Waters about the early days of the teams.

German... Into Infamy is a worthwhile read. No... better than that. A read almost required by us here on SH. Like you, I got to know the author here on SH and have a personal copy of his book. He got fully-exonerated earlier this year and I posted the finding on his behalf. A fantastic outcome for a guy who totally didn't deserve the screwing he got at the hands of the turd-burglars that infested the White House and Pentagon for much of the last decade. His getting cleared, while it didn't resurrect his great career.... at least proved he was right. Great guy!

Sajer's book is great, too.

Another interesting book, hard to find in CONUS is "The Quiet Soldier" by Adam Ballinger. About selection into the 21 SAS, their territorials regiment. Not as well known as the 22nd... but just as bada**.. Interesting guys.

Cheers,

Sirhr
Thanks for the correction mechanic, Beckwith sounds like a very interesting guy. I'll have to look into Delta Force for sure. Just added Into Infamy to my Amazon list as well.
 
Apr 17, 2010
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Astoria, Or.
#24
If anybody has interest in intelligence operations these are two oldies but goodies. The "Penskovsky Papers" recounts the story of Oleg Penskovky, a Russian Colonel who provided US and GB with strategic intel. during the sixties. The second is "The Spy Who Came In From the Cold" by John LeCarre". A fictional account (?) of a MI6 false flag operation that led to the entire George Smiley series by LeCarre. Both exhibit well researched tradescraft knowledge and are great reads.

Anecdotally, these and even Bond books were part of a reading list we had when I was at Ft. Holabird in '67.


Edit: '68 not '67. What's a year, give or take, after a half century?
 
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#30
Reading a Christmas book... Killing England. One of the Bill O'Reilly series. They are not 'deep thought' history books. But any book in that series is a great light read and I always learn some new and interesting factoids.

This one is about the Revolutionary War. It's well done. Well-sourced and engagingly-written. Definitely recommend! Not for its academic original research, but for its readability! You will enjoy it!

Cheers,

Sirhr
 
Aug 16, 2010
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Frostbite falls,MN
#31
Just finished, "Verbal Judo "by George Thompson. Good book. Right before that I read,
BOUNTY HUNTER 4/3 by Jason Delgado,
The Operator by Robert O'Neill
A handful of hard men, by Hannes Wessels
Twilight Warriors by Jame Kitfield

I didn't think there was a bad one in the bunch, a Handful of Hard Men is a great read.
 
Apr 9, 2006
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Littleton, Colorado
#32
I'd love to see a forum dedicated to books on Snipers Hide.. There have been a variety of SH threads over the years on books, but they seem to come and go. I've gotten lots of good recommendations from them.

In any case, a couple of my recent reads:

Brad Taylor - the whole Pike Logan series is really good. If you like Brad Thor you will like these.

Stephen Hunter's latest Swagger book, G-man, OK but disappoints with some PC BS and a weak ending.

Just completed the first of the Scott McEwen Sniper Elite series, One Way Trip and it was great. Just ordered the second book from my library. If you like fiction and you are here on SH, don't miss these.

There's tons of older stuff, but I'll just stick with my most recent reads for now.
 
May 20, 2006
1,157
64
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Winnipeg, Mb.
#33
FWIW, I just finished reading the "Level Zero Heroes" yesterday, and I have to ask 2 things:
1-has anyone else read it?
2-how true (and rampant) is the leadership scenario described in the book?

I'll leave all other questions about the popularity of fragging and such alone for the moment.