Ranging question

MK20

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I am trying to build a ranging sheet for my data book based on a 12' target. I am looking to determine what that 12" target will be in mills at different ranges, i.e. the size of the target and distance to target are known, but mil measurement is unknown. I know that there has to be a formula for this, but I am bad at math and can't seem to find my way with algebra to the right formula.
Could one of you guys post it below?
Thanks
 

acudaowner

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not that I fully understand the question , but do you want to know what a 12'' plate is at a given distance ? or how much elevation you need to use to hit that 12'' plate at a distance ? other wise I am really lost sorry not your fault just newish my self to all this .
 

stello1001

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Okay so someone correct me if I'm wrong...

If 1 mrad @ 100 yards is 3.6 inches, that means 10 mrads @ 100 yards is 36 inches.

12 inches is one third of 36 inches. Keep this in mind, it'll become handy later.

If 1 mrad is 3.6 inches @ 100 yards, then 1 mrad must equal to 36 inches @ 1000 yards.

If 12 inches is one third of 36 inches, that must make your 12 inches target equal to .33 mrads at 1000 yards.

Explanation:
because we know that 36 inches @ 1000 yards is equal to 1 mrad and we know that 12 inches is one third of 36 inches, we try to find out what one third of an mrad is by dividing by 3

Did you see what I did there?

Since 1 mrad is 36 inches @ 1000 yards, we can figure out what that would look like at 500 yards by dividing by two. This would mean that one mrad is 18 inches @ 500 yards. Your 12 inch target is two thirds of 18 inches. Your 12 target would also equal to .66 mrads at 500 yards.

Hopefully you get the gist of this and now you can apply this math to whatever distance you want so you know the value you are looking for.

***edit***
So my mind isn't very clear right now being that it's 330AM my time lol.

But it appears that what I did was figure out what one mrad is in inches @ X distance. Then you do some division.

12 ÷ (by whatever number you got) = your desired value

One mil @ 300 yards is 10.8 inches.
12÷10.8=1.11111

Your 12 inch target @ 300 yards is roughly 1.1 mils wide. How did I figure out that 1 mrad is equal to 10.8 inches @ 300 yards?

Remember, 1 mrad is 36 inches at 1000 yards. So...

1000 ÷ 300 = 3.33333333

36 ÷ 3.3333333 = 10.8
 
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barronian

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@MK20 mils are very simple

1585126327320.png

'size' can be in any unit you like (inch,foot,yards,meters,...) and the result will be in the same unit.

so if your 12" (.33 yard) target ranges as .6 mil then the distance to the target is

.33 x 1000 / 0.6 = 550 yards.

1585126705127.png
 

stello1001

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Another option to figure out what 1 mrad equals to @ whatever distance is to multiply by a hundredth of that distance with 3.6.

For example, if you want to know what 1 mrad is at 850 yards, you multiply as follows:

850 × 3.6 = 30.6

This means 1 mrad is equal to 30.6 inches @ 850 yards.
This is step one, figuring out what 1 mrad is in inches at X distance. Now that we have this value, we move on to step two.
Step two is to divide 12 by whatever that previous value is.

12÷30.6=.392

This means your 12 inch target @ 850 yards covers roughly .4 mrads or just a tad bit less.
 

stello1001

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@MK20 mils are very simple

View attachment 7281129

'size' can be in any unit you like (inch,foot,yards,meters,...) and the result will be in the same unit.

so if your 12" (.33 yard) target ranges as .6 mil then the distance to the target is

.33 x 1000 / 0.6 = 550 yards.

View attachment 7281133

I believe the OP wants to know how many mils his 12 inch target covers at X distances.
Or how much of his reticle will be covering his 12 inch target at whatever his distances are.


His distances are known and his target size is known.

Being that the target is 12 inches (I'm assuming a 12x12 plate or 12 inch diameter circle), he wants to know how wide (in mils) it will be @ 150 yards, 400 yards, 780 yards, 920 yards, etc.

At least that's how I understood it because of his OP is worded.
 

barronian

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I believe the OP wants to know how many mils his 12 inch target covers at X distances.
Or how much of his reticle will be covering his 12 inch target at whatever his distances are.


His distances are known and his target size is known.

Being that the target is 12 inches (I'm assuming a 12x12 plate or 12 inch diameter circle), he wants to know how wide (in mils) it will be @ 150 yards, 400 yards, 780 yards, 920 yards, etc.

At least that's how I understood it because of his OP is worded.

just rearrange the equation to be :

0.33 x 1000 / distance = mils

or 330/distance = mils ...
 

Jack Master

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I am trying to build a ranging sheet for my data book based on a 12' target. I am looking to determine what that 12" target will be in mills at different ranges, i.e. the size of the target and distance to target are known, but mil measurement is unknown. I know that there has to be a formula for this, but I am bad at math and can't seem to find my way with algebra to the right formula.
Could one of you guys post it below?
Thanks
target size/(3.6*(Yds/100))

Example - 12" target at 800 yards
12"/(3.6x8) = 0.41 mils

Example - 12" target at 458 yards
12"/(3.6x4.58) = 0.72 mils
 
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308pirate

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MK20

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Tons of good info here. It was late and I was hitting a mental block. My question has been answered. Thanks.
 

_Raining

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I would just use:
(Target height in inches * 27.77) / Height in mils = range to target in yards

you can swap Height in mils and range to target in yards and get:
333.24 / (100, 200, 300, 400 etc) = height in mils

In this hobby, it doesn't hurt to learn a bit of coding for python or excel shenanigans.

I just made a quick python 3 script:

Target Size in Inches: 12"
Range Mils
100 3.33
150 2.22
200 1.67
250 1.33
300 1.11
350 0.95
400 0.83
450 0.74
500 0.67
550 0.61
600 0.56
650 0.51
700 0.48
750 0.44
800 0.42
Code:
#You modify the shit below this
startRangeInYards = 100
stepSizeInYards = 50
endRangeInYards = 800
targetSizeInInches = 12

#You do NOT modify the shit below this
endRangeInYards = endRangeInYards + stepSizeInYards
print ("Target Size in Inches: " + str(targetSizeInInches) + "\"")
print ("Range     Mils")
for yardRange in range(startRangeInYards, endRangeInYards, stepSizeInYards):
    heightInMils = (27.77 * targetSizeInInches) / yardRange
    print (str(yardRange) + "       " + "{:.2f}".format(heightInMils))
 

MK20

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That is also awesome. I am not that good in excel but I am ok at it.
Thanks a bunch.
 

stello1001

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target size/(3.6*(Yds/100))

Example - 12" target at 800 yards
12"/(3.6x8) = 0.41 mils

Example - 12" target at 458 yards
12"/(3.6x4.58) = 0.72 mils
Damn, this is what I should have posted last night. Simple and to the point, an equation that will give the desires result at any distance.

I knew my brain wasn't working at it's finest @330 and I went on a whole trip writing up everything I did lol!



Esp. @stello1001

That is exactly what I was looking for.
Thank you,

and that equation by Jack master is probably what you were looking for to begin with. You'll find it to be very useful for what you're looking to do.
 
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308pirate

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Wow some of you guys are dense

@barronian gave you guys the simplest, most elegant correct answer and you all went full retard.

Math is hard, I know
 

Shifty6BR

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27.78 (constant) x (12") ÷ mils in reticle.

For mil value over varying ranges I use...

878 yds
3.6x8.78 = 31.6

260 yds
3.6x2.6 =9.36 etc etc. ...
 
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Tmm01

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Target size and distance are known, size of target in mils is unknown. So if you are not out in the field looking through your scope but sitting in your living room crunching numbers here's how to do it.

12(target size, inches) x 27.78(constant) = 333.36 / known distance = mils
Ex 12 x 27.78 = 333.36 / 500 yards = .66 mils