Question about mils

Oct 2, 2007
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#1
One question about mil dots for holdoff.
For Example:

I shot at 1000 meters.
I know my bullet drop from my ballistic chart/table.
Now i fired a shot,and it comes low.
I read in my scope that the shot goes 1 mil down(what is 1 meter at 1000 meter,right)?
Now i have two options right?
First:i have to dial with my elevation knob 10 klicks(what mean 1 mil,10 cm at 100 meter,and 1 meter at 1000)?
Second:simply hold that 1 mil over with the mil dot reticle?

Or otherwise:
You shoot at 500 meters.
You dialed in your bullet drop and observe in your scope that the shot goes 0.5 mil down.This is 25 cm,right?
Cause 0.1 mil is at 100 meters 1 cm.
So you have 0.5 mil what is at 100 meters 5 cm,but on 500 meters,it is 5cmx5(500meter)=25 cm.

Sorry for asking stupid,and for bad english.
Thanks for your help.
P.s.i want to use FFP scope with 0.1 mil clicks.8
 

pmclaine

Gunny Sergeant
Nov 6, 2011
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#2
A milradian is a milradian.

It is not a centimeter or a meter.

If your reticle tellls you you are one mil down than you can dial up one mil or hold one mil.

Distance doesn't matter.

Your eye, your reticle, and the shot hole tell the story assuming FFP or SFP at the right magnification.
 

Lowlight

HMFIC of this Shit
Staff member
Apr 12, 2001
26,833
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Base of the Rockies
www.snipershide.com
#3
Exactly

When the turrets match the reticle, what you see in the reticle is what you dial on the turret, the distance is irrelevant

If you see a 1 Mil correction in the reticle, dial it, doesn't matter, yards, or meters, it's What you See is what you get
 
Oct 2, 2007
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#4
Many,many thanks guys.This helps a lot.
You are the best.
@Frank:You do a great job.I love this Forum and your Videos with Sniper online lessons.It teaches me a lot.I shoot in the past F-/TR,and have Sfp scopes used with Moa Turrets.Now i want to switch to ffp with metric knobs for practical shooting and hunting.
 

Rerun7

Furious George
Feb 18, 2017
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Fayetteville, Arkansas
#6
The biggest lesson I learned when moving from MOA to MIL was that the drop in inches or centimeters, etc is irrelevant. I used to memorize how many inches of drop I had at certain yardage’s and then do the math to get my dope in MOA.

Now, I only pay attention to the MILs and shooting got way more simple. If it’s low by a MIL then just adjust a MIL.
 

GreenCanoe

New Hide Member
Jun 21, 2018
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#8
Now i want to switch to ffp with metric knobs for practical shooting and hunting.
Remember though, a MIL is not metric. A MIL is simply a unit of angular measurement. Sure, people correlate it to the metric system simply because it uses a base 10 system which work well with meters, but you can use that with the imperial system, too. For example, a MIL is also 1 inch at 1000 inches, 1 yard at 1000 yards, 1 mile at 1000 miles, one canoe at a thousand canoes, etc. The numbers don't matter, a MIL is it's own unit of measurement. To make things easier for you on the range or in the field build your drop tables to read drop in MILs rather than inches or centimeters. Thants what your reticle will show you for holdover anyway.
 

pmclaine

Gunny Sergeant
Nov 6, 2011
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#9
Once you "get it" it really is simple.

I just converted a rifle over to a simple capped turret mil dot reticle just to do away with all the BS and have a rifle you just point and shoot, not wondering if I dialed right or did a turret get bumped.

Look through the eyepiece hold your mil drop and let it fly. If you observe a splash, measure through your ocular and adjust your hold accordingly.

This is going to be my fun steel gun, with a standard 5 mil reticle I think I can get out to 800 without having to do something bizarre...

http://forum.snipershide.com/threads/new-glass-for-the-repro-m40.6888219/
 
Feb 7, 2013
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411
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The West
#10
Remember though, a MIL is not metric. A MIL is simply a unit of angular measurement. Sure, people correlate it to the metric system simply because it uses a base 10 system which work well with meters, but you can use that with the imperial system, too. For example, a MIL is also 1 inch at 1000 inches, 1 yard at 1000 yards, 1 mile at 1000 miles, one canoe at a thousand canoes, etc. The numbers don't matter, a MIL is it's own unit of measurement. To make things easier for you on the range or in the field build your drop tables to read drop in MILs rather than inches or centimeters. Thants what your reticle will show you for holdover anyway.
I think you made a typo:

“”For example, a MIL is also 1 inch at 1000 inches, 1 yard at 1000 yards, 1 mile at 1000 miles..””

Did you mean, a MIL “is a MIL” @ xxx
 

Sheldon N

Blind Squirrel Finds a Nut
Sep 24, 2014
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Pacific Northwest
#11
Did you mean, a MIL “is a MIL” @ xxx
No, he's right. It's a milliradian, or 1/1000 or a radian. Radian is the radius of a circle converted into an angular measurement, so it's the same a 1/1000 of the radius. If the shooter is the center of a circle and the target is at the edge of the circle, then the distance from shooter to target is the radius. 1/1000 of that distance (no matter what distance it is) is equivalent to 1 mil.

Here's a little animated diagram that helps illustrate... the red line at the beginning is the radius, and the radian. A Mil is 1/1000 of that angle.

 

Skookum

Knuckle Dragger
May 6, 2017
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#12
No, he's right. It's a milliradian, or 1/1000 or a radian. Radian is the radius of a circle converted into an angular measurement, so it's the same a 1/1000 of the radius. If the shooter is the center of a circle and the target is at the edge of the circle, then the distance from shooter to target is the radius. 1/1000 of that distance (no matter what distance it is) is equivalent to 1 mil.

Here's a little animated diagram that helps illustrate... the red line at the beginning is the radius, and the radian. A Mil is 1/1000 of that angle.

Exactly. In fact, a different way to do MIL math is to simply figure the target size in any unit you wish, (even canoes) multiply by 1000, then divide by the size in MILS as seen through the scope reticle.

It requires one more math operation to figure the target size in a different unit of measurement, but eliminates the need for a constant, making it more flexible.
 
Feb 7, 2013
1,939
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The West
#13
I guess I just can not type a sentence that makes sense.
I think you made a typo:

“”For example, a MIL is also 1 inch at 1000 inches, 1 yard at 1000 yards, 1 mile at 1000 miles..””

Did you mean, a MIL “is a MIL” @ xxx
Sheldon, were are saying the same a mil = mil at any distance unless we confuse the two base systems ;)

The way I read the post, I responded to is that it seemed to me the post that he was saying 1 Mil equaled 1” @100 and 1 yard at 1000.maybe i I read his post wrong.
 
Likes: Sheldon N

Dthomas3523

Blind Squirrel
Jan 31, 2018
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#14
I guess I just can not type a sentence that makes sense.

Sheldon, were are saying the same a mil = mil at any distance unless we confuse the two base systems ;)

The way I read the post, I responded to is that it seemed to me the post that he was saying 1 Mil equaled 1” @100 and 1 yard at 1000.maybe i I read his post wrong.
He said 1” @ 1000” and 1 yd @ 1000 yds.

Basically, anything at 1/1000th scale.
 

mijp5

Gunny Sergeant
May 7, 2009
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#15
The only reason people think mils equate to metric is because metric operates on the power of 10, and the imperial system does not. A mil at 100m is 10 cm. At 100 yds it is 10 “centiyards”, or 3.6”.
 
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