PTSD

Blaster7Romeo

Private
Belligerents
May 23, 2010
172
22
22
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Hendersonville NC
#5
My Ex GF has given me more PTSD than anything I did in Iraq Or Afghanistan. ( I was a grunt in the 82nd Airborne form 02-05) Funny and sad all at the same time.. I think it is I was prepared for and taught how to react to situations in the Army... having a crazy woman you love doing what ever.. no training manual for that.. lol


In my opinion PTSD is real I but think it is over diagnosed and used as a crutch for some. and it takes away from the people that have real issues they need help with
 

wyld3man

Private
Minuteman
Aug 18, 2017
69
44
24
FL
#7
My Ex GF has given me more PTSD than anything I did in Iraq Or Afghanistan. ( I was a grunt in the 82nd Airborne form 02-05) Funny and sad all at the same time.. I think it is I was prepared for and taught how to react to situations in the Army... having a crazy woman you love doing what ever.. no training manual for that.. lol


In my opinion PTSD is real I but think it is over diagnosed and used as a crutch for some. and it takes away from the people that have real issues they need help with
I got PTSD from an ex who gave me an STD, the doctor visit was a nightmare.

I agree, I think it is over diagnosed also. If you claim PTSD when leaving the military it’s a good chunk of compensation pay. I have seen support soldiers get paid nicely for claiming it when the most traumatic event they had while deployed was a rocket landing 10k from their FOB. While guys out there dodging bullets and IED”s don’t claim it at all.
 

Spblademaker

Don’t tell my wife
Online Training Access
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Oct 24, 2017
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#9
My buddy needs to stop hiding in a bottle. But he’s too stubborn to take steps. Doing what I can to keep him from sinking deeper. Always make time for him when he wants to do stuff. I guess every little bit helps. The stigma and potential 2A rights violations don’t help matters.
 

Sean the Nailer

Sergeant
Belligerents
May 20, 2006
2,461
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Winnipeg, Mb.
#10
Well, if it isn't "Our Man In Ireland"..... good to see ya bro! And yeah guys, his face may be somewhat new to many/most, but he's been "from here" for a long time. Some of you might have been following my threads about his progress, over the years.

Don't be bashful or afraid to hit him up in a PM, is what I'm saying. Others here can back me up on this, too.
 

Fig

Janitor of the Hide
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Mar 15, 2018
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#11
I know it’s cliche, but time does heal all wounds. My experience is that you simply have to deal with it, and then there will come day where it doesn’t effect you at all and you don’t even think about it. Then some time later you will go a whole week. After a while you’ll go a month. Eventually you’re throttled back to the speed of life, not ridiculously paranoid, and not suspecting everyone you see of treachery.

PTSD is a normal and natural thing in a combat zone. It keeps you alive. It’s just bad when you rotate back to la la land.
 

Foul Mike

Gunny Sergeant
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Apr 18, 2001
1,600
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Eastern Colorado
#14
PTSD from combat or firefights or police actions or any other thing you can imagine where your life was on the line and you had to fight back in order to stay alive and did kill others, is a horrible thing and I do believe it is something that never leaves you nor gives you any peace. It is always there even 50 years later it haunts you.

Other than that, I have got nothing to say.
 

Precision Underground

Commercial Supporter
Commercial Supporter
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Jun 21, 2017
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Tallahassee, FL
#15
Never been to war and mad respect for those that have. I think reaching out to just do normal everyday stuff would be a big help. I had a friend that was one of the statistics of veteran suicides and can’t help but always think I should have reached out more to just give him someone to hang with to get back to “normal” life. Talking about it is good and that needs to be done but IMO even better is put that shit behind you and move on to new stuff, normal stuff. Go bowling, go play golf, watch the game, just do normal shit so he remembers what it’s like.
 

Bama Fan

Full Member
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May 10, 2013
121
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Charlotte
#16
I was diagnosed with PTSD in 2011 after suffering a stroke coupled with heart issues. I made 7 trips to the ER and was admitted 6 times in a 45 day period. After therapy and learning my triggers, I have it under control. I agree that having a strong support network is very important. On of the things that helped me is talking about it. Don’t ever be afraid to ask for help. If you have any questions about my particular situation, feel free to pm me.
 
Likes: Edward156

Mr_Happyface

Huge Dork
Belligerents
Mar 13, 2006
247
9
22
#18
I agree, I think it is over diagnosed also. If you claim PTSD when leaving the military it’s a good chunk of compensation pay. I have seen support soldiers get paid nicely for claiming it when the most traumatic event they had while deployed was a rocket landing 10k from their FOB. While guys out there dodging bullets and IED”s don’t claim it at all.

This.

It's absolutely disgusting.


Worst thing that happened to me overseas is when we ran out of strawberry ice cream and I was forced to eat plain vanilla with a strawberry topping. That being said, I have read some interesting articles about psychedelic mushrooms and the research being done about overcoming PTSD through their use.


Beats a daily regimen of antidepressants and other pills I suppose.
 

Culpeper

One divided by F
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Nov 25, 2006
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#19
My name is Jack Crabb and I am the lone survivor of Custer's battalion on the ridges above the Little Bighorn valley on the Crow reservation. I rode with that SOB as a scout and if a Northern Cheyenne that was my step brother didn't recognize me I would have been snuffed out myself. Contact me by PM if you are conducting a study.
 
Likes: Edward156

oneshotmike

Private
Belligerents
Sep 1, 2017
40
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Westwood, NJ
#20
As a nation we have to understand that we need to do more and do it better for our returning veterans. I would suggest that due to the advances in modern medical science, we have guys coming home that may not have in years past. We have learned how to save their lives over years of war. The statistics are staggering, it is said that 22 veterans take their life each day. There are many informal support systems out there, but what our military trains people to do overseas must be undone before their return to civilian life. The numbers are unacceptable and it doesn't appear that there has been an effort to behalf of the govt to fix this. The people that fight for us to live free deserve better..... to those that have served, thank you!

I do not have a military background, but do work in law enforcement for over 20 years. PTSD is something that certainly affects people and its causes are different for different people. If you see some signs, do something about it. Suicide is a permanent solution to temporary problems.
 

Culpeper

One divided by F
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Nov 25, 2006
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#21
The fucking truth is PTSD is common and all around us. Their are more civilians with no military background suffering from it. Life will eventually hand you a dose of PTSD. The worst thing the government did was promoting PTSD as an exclusive military thing with putting productive life on hold with compensation while the civilian populace deals with it much differently. We still have to get up everyday and go to work and face life until we are dead. It has been like this since cavemen. Our servicemen are institutionalized. The vast majority of current service related PTSD can be tied to institutionalization. The current young veteran with no overseas duty will have a panic attack their first trip to a supermarket in civilian clothes with a shopping list that somebody made for them.
 

GNAP

Private
Minuteman
Feb 4, 2019
5
5
6
#22
While I was never military or a LEO, due to a massive boiler explosion, 37 years ago, where I received burns over 83% of my body and endured 16 weeks in a IC burn unit, I have been diagnosed with form of PTSD. Along with the massive scarring, the nerve damage, other health related issues, the nightmares, migraine headaches and the anxiety attacks, are still a reoccurring problem. With the passage of time, the effects have lessened somewhat and have become less frequent, they can and still do happen.

While I have suffered a great deal over the years, but seeing the effects of the 3 tours of duty had on my brother, in Vietnam, in the Marine Corp, I feel, he definitely got the worst of it. His ordeal came to an end, when the Agent Orange related cancer finally got him.
 
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Culpeper

One divided by F
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#23
You both got bad breaks in life. But it is people like you that can help veterans deal with it. I honestly believe that civilians with life experiences are key to helping today's veterans deal with their demons and reintragrated.
 

308220

Karma Enforcer
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Jul 19, 2014
668
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#24
My Ex GF has given me more PTSD than anything I did in Iraq Or Afghanistan. ( I was a grunt in the 82nd Airborne form 02-05) Funny and sad all at the same time.. I think it is I was prepared for and taught how to react to situations in the Army... having a crazy woman you love doing what ever.. no training manual for that.. lol


In my opinion PTSD is real I but think it is over diagnosed and used as a crutch for some. and it takes away from the people that have real issues they need help with
A lot def use it as a crutch and a pity party. A girl i know has a bf. He just joined the marines like 8 (maybe less) months ago. Has not been overseas or in battle to this date. Hes currently sitting at the base in Texas. Tells his gf hes suffering from "ptsd" and thats his reasoning for treating her like shit. Hes "depressed". Cheating. Being a drunk. And shes on it hook line and sinker. Will not leave his stupid ass for nothing. I can only imagine the "battle" stories he tells her. I bet she thinks shes dating Rambo.

Typical dumbass woman.
 

Edward156

Private
Belligerents
Apr 24, 2013
25
55
18
#25
I’m probably new to a lot of you guys . Been sorting through the private messages and replied to them all now . I’m thankful to know many of you here and count you as friends and brothers . Now I realize what triggers me .
 
Likes: Culpeper

wyld3man

Private
Minuteman
Aug 18, 2017
69
44
24
FL
#26
A lot def use it as a crutch and a pity party. A girl i know has a bf. He just joined the marines like 8 (maybe less) months ago. Has not been overseas or in battle to this date. Hes currently sitting at the base in Texas. Tells his gf hes suffering from "ptsd" and thats his reasoning for treating her like shit. Hes "depressed". Cheating. Being a drunk. And shes on it hook line and sinker. Will not leave his stupid ass for nothing. I can only imagine the "battle" stories he tells her. I bet she thinks shes dating Rambo.

Typical dumbass woman.
Sounds like the drone pilots that fly predators in Afghanistan from Nevada. They have been known to claim PTSD, I can see the point. Must be extremely difficult to deal with smoking shit heads from an air conditioned trailer, then getting off your shift and playing craps on the strip while the guys you supported are sitting in a mud hole dodging bullets 5000 miles away.
 

shootist2004

Sergeant
Belligerents
Mar 1, 2005
775
111
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64
las vegas
#27
there was a good movie about that called EYE IN THE SKY. the kid from breaking bad starred in it. I could see how they would claim that cause he almost had to kill a kid. movie bombed thou....
 

Fig

Janitor of the Hide
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Mar 15, 2018
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#28
Well, it been super common among soldiers forever. If it’s debilitating you need to lean heavy on the guys you served with and your friends. I’d medicate only as a last resort, and then anti-depresants ONLY, NOT alcohol or other drugs.

If it’s not affecting your life in a significant way (wife kids, family, etc.), and you’re just doing stupid shit like making circles around the bar you are going to, checking out the alley and the back door, keeping your back to the wall, being a general paranoid dick, .etc., just be mindful and it will slowly go away. if it's actually messing up your life go to your buddies, and do what they say even if you don't like their advice.

Mine was just the stupid shit and being an asshole. I only got real anxiety attacks around crowds. So I avoided them for a long time and slowly went to more and more crowded places till about ten years later I could be in a big crowd without feeling terribly uncomfortable.

I was pretty much in total denial about it and argued with people about how relaxed and mellow I was, which was utter horseshit looking back on it... Still it just took time, but I will say that I did not just come home and go from intense situations to full stop. I picked occupations that still had a lot of intensity and allowed me to be a leader, and that helped me a lot.

It effects everyone differently. I had to slap the shit out of a retard, Army grunt, friend of mine who came back from the sandbox with his jaw blown off and reconstructed (very well I might add). He was acting like a total, pussy, welfare bitch on his disability and PTSD checks. There are guys with no arms and legs who don't let that happen to them! Those checks almost fucked up his life permanently. I had to be on his ass constantly being a total dick and insulting him all the time to make him get off his lazy ass and do something with his life besides feeling sorry for himself and self medicating. It got to the point where almost every interaction was a very negative one. He thought I was the biggest asshole in the State and said as much often.

Today we are back to being good friends, and he has told me how grateful he is that I was his one friend who didn't feel sorry for him and demanded he get up off his ass and do something instead of joining the pity party with everyone else. I certainly don't take credit for anything, because he had to do it himself or he would still be a waste of space, but today he owns a Plumbing and GC business with about twenty-five employees and a million bucks in machines in his yard. He is rocking, happy, and his PTSD is not worth mentioning if he even still has a touch.

I don't say this is some primmer for everyone. Everyone is different, and there are people with real shell-shock who need professional help. I do think they're the minority though. Most people need to be treated like adults and you must expect them to behave like adults or you're doing them no favors. I'd say the most important thing if they have serious PTSD is not to drink and party with them. If It's really bad demand they get real help, and be a REAL friend; the kind who tells it like it is, and expects very good things from the few people who get to be called "friend". THEY have to do it. You can't do it for them. You can only encourage them to get help and to help themselves. If all they say is, "Woe is me", they're not going to do it, so the first thing is to snap them out of that shit. Sometimes you got to be a dick. Just my experience.
 

Blutroop

Sergeant of the Hide
Belligerents
Minuteman
Oct 25, 2018
365
343
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Alaska
#29
Be careful who you talk to but find people you can talk to. Everyone has different triggers. Figure yours out. Don’t bottle it all up or you will have a massive release. What I found was stable Vietnam era vets could understand what I was going through And found ways to deal with their issues before it was talked about. One of my triggers was/is crouds. I moved to a small town. I now enjoy walking in the woods armed.. it’s accepted up here because everyone hunts and we have brown bears up here. More space has definitely helped, but I’ve been able to tell it’s also the quality of people around me not just the quantity. We have a Walmart here and if I spend to much time in it my bottle starts to get full. To many idiot drivers and my bottle fills up. I’ve taught myself to notice before my bottle is full and at least get away from people and into nature. In the wintertime I can get out and not see a person for days. I can walk on frozen lakes and get a adrenaline fix. I put myself into situations were I must remain aware. For a while I got into airguns and would hunt grouse. I have a family now and that seems to be calming me down a lot too. When I first got out I travelled all over America. Be careful who you talk to. We don’t have our rights anymore and if you read the right wing radicalization report and look at how Hollywood portrays ptsd to gen pop, it’s clear that the gov plans on trying to strip away 2a rights from vets with ptsd. I got out in 2006. I’ve noticed I have also forgot a lot of what happened. That was one of my defense. Now out of the blue I will remember a event I blocked out and it’s not that bad. Good luck
 

j-huskey

Jafo / Instigator !
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Jul 27, 2001
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#33
Ok, none of you PLEASE take offense at the following.....

My electronic device I use to read Snipershide has developed PTSD looking at posts like Police or Firemen, Which Earns Their Pay, .....

My device keeps shutting down, going black, refusing to power up, screen blinking like its stuttering, and sometimes it makes angry sounds........ as it sees some of the junk....

And that mirrors some of 'maybe my' real PTSD response when triggered...
Device does better not reading some of the trigger bullshit....

PTSD is very very real. Ask my device.

About 90% of my peer group has some form of PTSD. Maybe 5% are totally inoperable. Maybe 5% are 50/50, maybe 10% are 25/75-75good side, and the rest with less than 25% bad days are what we consider normal.
Day to day successes increase the good numbers as long as we recognize we need to emphasize the positive and know the positive builds a better foundation to succeed.
I dont have any solution for 5% inoperable, because nothing seemed to help them, and we bury them much too frequently it seems.

Best to you !
 

Edward156

Private
Belligerents
Apr 24, 2013
25
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18
#35
Seen way too many people develop drug and alcohol problems which always terrified the shit out of me . Thankfully I never succumbed to either , mainly due to a strong family support network . Crazy as this may seem I got a cat ! Crazy little fucker . Bites the shit out of me . He brought home another equally dysfunctional little fucker of a stray cat ! Now ive got two cats ! Both dysfunctional little fuckers . So now when I have a bad day I stay away from people and play with my cats which calms me down big time
 

clcustom1911

Cop/Paramedic
Belligerents
Oct 23, 2017
378
397
69
Southern Kommiefornia
#38
Twice for me....... Talk about flashbacks!!
Many of us, when we look to the future, can see the day when government will use PTSD claims to dq people from firearms ownership.

If you need help get it. God bless And Good luck.
THIS!! Especially when states like California, etc are scheming to figure out ways to expand the "prohibited persons list"