Pros and cons of stock companies

Oct 15, 2017
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#1
Looking for an explanation:

What’s the biggest difference between a MCMillan stock vs a Manners stock vs a greyboe or KRG Bravo. They all have similar styling so they probably all feel similar. Outside of hardware and the palm swells what’s the major differences? Thank you in advance.

I am looking to build a new rifle and I am leaving the modular chassis world. I feel more comfortable behind a more traditional stock.
 

spife7980

Full Member
Feb 10, 2017
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TX
#2
Just plain feel. Take that two ways, the way they feel mounted up due to the angles and geometry of the stocknitself and how it fits your bodies frame and then the literal feel, my krg is obviously plastic with some molding ridges etc but it’s generally smooth, my manners feels smooth but it’s much more matte and feels almost chalky or like it’s just been sanded except it doesn’t stay on your hands, mcmillans are a bit more sticky feeling, not tacky but like when you try to slide your hand over a window and it snags or falling on a basketball court, just lots of friction some how. Of course any painting can completely alter that.
 

XLR308

Sergeant of the Hide
Mar 22, 2018
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#4
The biggest differences are going to be what options are available.
The McMillan and Manners stocks have an endless array of options and configurations were the Grayboe doesnt and that is reflected in the price as well as the wait times. The differences in the quality of the finishes on the stocks will be obvious as well.
I own two stocks with the A5 pattern, one is a Manners T4 and one is a Choate. The Manners has a great finish and is fairly lite while the Chaote is fairly plain but built like a tank with more features and less than half the cost.
I wanted the extra weight of the Choate and aluminum block for the action on my 300wm and didnt want to spend a bunch of money on it.
 

flyer

Sergeant of the Hide
Apr 25, 2018
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#5
It should be pretty easy to get a KRG Bravo off the shelf if it's a common inlet.

I'm not sure about the others.

The weights could be quite different.

I think I'm a fan of chassis that use a bolt on pistol grip, that let's you swap out or modify one of the biggest ergonomic features.

That and a few other features caused me to order a MPA chassis. They quoted 8-12 week delivery time. I'm at 10 weeks but I heard a couple weeks ago that they are still working on some orders placed last November so I have no idea when I'll get my chassis.
 
Oct 15, 2017
33
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8
ND
#6
It should be pretty easy to get a KRG Bravo off the shelf if it's a common inlet.

I'm not sure about the others.

The weights could be quite different.

I think I'm a fan of chassis that use a bolt on pistol grip, that let's you swap out or modify one of the biggest ergonomic features.

That and a few other features caused me to order a MPA chassis. They quoted 8-12 week delivery time. I'm at 10 weeks but I heard a couple weeks ago that they are still working on some orders placed last November so I have no idea when I'll get my chassis.
I know of some vendors who have their chassis in stock right now. They shoot at our local PRS matches.


I have an XLR element. But I just could not get comfortable behind it like I can behind my bergara. I shoot the bergara better. So I switched over to using the bergara in competition. But I want to start a new build. Been looking at the grayboe renagade and KrG bravo. Plus all the used McMillan and manners here on the hide. The choices have me on full overload.
 

flyer

Sergeant of the Hide
Apr 25, 2018
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#7
I know some places have MPA stocks on the shelf, just not what I ordered.

My first rifles were FALs so I got used to hollow plastic stocks with combs designed for shooting while wearing a helmet. Anything that adjusts enough to get me in a reasonable shooting position is good enough for me. I will spend time setting up my MPA. That might mean filing my pistol grip, building up my pistol grip with urethane roofing adhesive or doing some custom padding on the comb. It will be comfortable to me I'm sure.
 

flyer

Sergeant of the Hide
Apr 25, 2018
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#10
Yeah, I ordered off the menu. It wasn't smart but I didn't know about the delays. I knew 12 weeks wasn't a problem in my schedule, I just didn't know it might be 24.
 
Likes: Rexwagon
Oct 15, 2017
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#12
Making things more difficult. Haha. So what’s the word on these KRG bravos. I seen a lot of positive comments but none negative, which sort of bothers me. Like they truly haven’t been tested or put through their paces.
 

Bandit31

For Sale Access
Feb 6, 2018
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Bakersfield, Ca
#13
Making things more difficult. Haha. So what’s the word on these KRG bravos. I seen a lot of positive comments but none negative, which sort of bothers me. Like they truly haven’t been tested or put through their paces.
Thats because there isn't much to gripe about the Bravo chassis. As more of an entry level chassis, it is extremely well thought out and solid.
 
Likes: Rexwagon
Jun 17, 2009
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Houston, TX
#14
I like chassis' because I like the ability to just drop in an action and not worry about bedding.

Once you bed a fiberglass action, you are stuck with that action for that stock unless you want your gunsmith to go through the painstaking process of rebedding it to a different action. Not a big deal if you plan on sticking with that one action forever, but could definitely limit you or cost you some time and money in the future if you do decide to upgrade.

I bought a KRG Bravo for the wife's rifle that is currently being built. Played with it a bit before sending it off to get a paint job - I was really impressed. It's a pretty awesome chassis, especially for the price. Seems well made, and there are a lot of accessories available from KRG to upgrade it. Just bought an ARCA rail and ARCA spigot for the wife's chassis. It's also super comfy to boot.

After the last debacle trying to get a stock rebedded, I will probably never get another fiberglass stock again. Not with all the chassis options available these days. Drop in a barreled action.and you are off to the races.
 
Jun 13, 2008
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#15
...unless you want your gunsmith to go through the painstaking process of rebedding it to a different action.

After the last debacle trying to get a stock rebedded,...
WTH happened?

It's not really that 'painstaking' usually. Bore out the previous pillars, remove most of the bedding material, re-do.
 
Oct 15, 2017
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#16
How does the krg bravo feel to the touch. Is it super hard polymer or slick or no? I’m very interested in the bravo but haven’t gotten to play with one yet.
 

FUNCTIONAL

Dirty Civilian
Feb 19, 2012
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Charlotte, NC
#17
The bravo texture is just like all of krgs polymer stuff. Its a bit rough for grip but its a finished rough and not a "just low quality" rough. In my opinion is just the right amount.

Ive had manners T4/T6, mcmillan A5/A4 and just recently the bravo. Palm swells were largest on manners, mcmillan A4 being slightly larger than the A5, bravo is hard to describe but id put it inbetween an A4 and A5. Im 5'7 155lbs with i guess average sized hands.

The interesting part is the comb height. All the manners and mcmillans ive had to adjust to jyst about max height while the bravo i only need half of the adjustment. I still haven't been able to put my finger on why yet. My scopes are all mounted to the lowest point and my scope over bore heights have negligible difference.

The only thing i can knock the bravo for is the rear does sound/feel hollow. But you have to realize the stock is sub $400 and by no means feels weak because of it. If we get nit picky when you tighten up the action per their procedure the lines from the rear half and the forearm half dont typically line up 100% . Again....sub $400 with the same performance as a manners/mcmillan.
 
Dec 19, 2017
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Austin, Tx
#18
I will echo FUNCTIONAL 's statements about the Bravo above as far as texture and the feel of the rear of the stock.

One thing to note is that the Bravo is very light at 2.9 lbs without a magazine. Once I mounted my action and scope in the chassis it was a little light in the rear for my liking. My easy and non-committal fix was filling two plastic baggies with steel, 1/4" nuts and sticking them in the cavities in the palm area and in the rear of the stock between the recoil pad and stock. This did the trick for me.

Only other thing is KRG shipped the wrong rear action screw and wrong rear flush cup screw when I purchased mine. I pre-ordered out of the first shipment batch last fall so I understand the mix up and to my knowledge this hasn't been a problem since that original release. KRG immediately sent the correct screws after I contacted them and even threw in the replacement stock piece that converts the buttstock to a "hooked" configuration for free, which was very nice of them.

For the price I don't think there is any other reputable chassis with as much modularity and customization options that still has a "traditional stock" look and feel. I've been nothing but pleased with mine thus far.
 

Rust

Sergeant
Apr 18, 2001
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#19
Let's see, three McMillan A-5s with three way butt plates, adjustable cheek piece and accessory rails. I was the first to option an A-5 like this back when Dick was still around years ago. Two McMillan Sako Varminter stocks one of which was ordered with a short LOP for shooting with a heavy winter jacket. Two McMillan M40s, one for a model 7, one for a 700.

For me buying a McMillan is a no brainer. I can spec them how I want them, they build them right the first time. Easy to talk to, excellent customer service. They also did a fine job of inletting and bedding a custom barreled action.

But I will say go to a match and ask to sit behind a few different stocks and snug up to them to see what feels good.
 

SLG

Sergeant of the Hide
Sep 2, 2009
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#20
Manners is right down the road from me, and they are really super guys to deal with. I want to buy a Manners every time I need a stock. However, Mcmillian actually fits me a bit better. Specifically, they forend on my Mcmillian of choice (Game Scout) is slimmer than the slimmest Manners forend. This matters to me because my hands are not huge. Also, the trigger reach, based on palm swell and inlet is better for me on the Mcmillian. I know the Manners can be inlet a little differently to bring the trigger back a bit, but that is more work, and more importantly, I have never actually tried one to see if it works for me. Though the distance will obviously be less, it will also change exactly where the palm swell hits me, so it may be a huge improvement or it may not be.

The functional differences between the two M's are very small, but with a custom gun, you should get what you want, and what actually works better for you. I can shoot them all, but Mcmillian just fits a bit better.
 
Jun 13, 2008
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#21
McMillan. One I.

Manners and McMillan can BOTH be inlet fore and slightly aft as a shooter desires, provided an aluminum block is not in use. All yhe work that entails is telling them when you order.

Too, adjustable blade triggers can help solve trigger placement issues.
 
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