Pistol reloading

patrick021

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This may be the wrong place to ask this question but what type press for pistol reloading progressive,single stage or turret? Thanks
 

Steel head

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I use a turret.
I’d consider that the bare minimum and I’d definitely Prefer a progressive for pistol.
 

Gatorshark

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If you do somewhat high volume shooting such as IDPA or IPSC, youll want a progressive press; or at least a good turent press.
 
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patrick021

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I have always loaded with a rcbs single stage I was wanting a turret press just don’t know 5he difference and is it worth it over the single stage. I can’t justify the progressive .
 

MadDuner

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I love my Dillon....
Even if I do sometimes become lazy and buy factory ammo to shoot.
 

gigamortis

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I have a Hornady LNL progressive for all my pistol reloading. The self indexing shell plate is a very nice feature to have. For those that prefer Dillon, I think you have to step up to the 650 model to get self indexing. The more things the press does automatically for you, the lesser the chance of making a mistake like double charging. All I do from outside the press is load an empty case in station 1, and seat a bullet in station 4. All the processes in between are done automatically.
 

goldenbear926

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I use a Dillon 550. If I did only pistol on it I'd step up to a 650/750. But I like the manual indexing for loading rifle ammunition or using as a single stage every once in a while.
 

davere

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Progressive. Dillon is the shit. 550 is a great starting point - though, arguably, the 650 is "safer" (because it auto-indexes). If you're new to reloading in general, you can use a 550 like a single stage - and then develop a solid process that you follow, which will prevent you from forgetting to advance the shellplate.

If you're a high volume shooter, 650 with a casefeeder is a minimum, but you'll end up on a 1050 or even a Mark 7 press at some point (just depending on volume and how much cash you want to spend). I can load 1200 rounds per hour on my 1050 - that translates to maybe 5 hours of range time (2-3 practice sessions, typically). That's a pretty good ratio between the loading bench and practice range, for me.
 
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A&8's

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Dillon 650 is what I use for pistol and plinker 223's.
 

clcustom1911

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This may be the wrong place to ask this question but what type press for pistol reloading progressive,single stage or turret? Thanks
Dillon RL450, Lee carbide pistol Dies and factory crimp die, Lee auto disk powder measure.

Used a Lee Classic Turret for like 9 years. Works very well, but I wanted to up the volume.
 

bfm1851

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I agree with above poster that say if your just starting out get a simple single stage press and learn the steps to reload safety. Once you develop a good procedure then step up to either a turret type or progressive depending on volume you shot. I use a Lee turret for all my pistol ammo. When I was working I could load about 100 rounds during my lunch break. If that meets your needs then I highly recommend the Lee Classic turret press. Cost effective and easy to run. If you need more ammo or reloading time is limited then ,maybe a Dillon is the way to go.
 

patrick021

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I shoot a lot at times I’ll never load enough to put justify the Dillion I load May rifles in a single stage now
 

Kadams1563

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If you go to classes or range training for pistol or carbine I could imagine doing it on a single stage.

I mean my training classes were 1000 rounds usually. I’m not doing that in anything BUT a Dillon.

even going to the local range I take 200-400 rounds depending on what I’m doing.
 

Anb618

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I started reloading on a Lyman T-Mag. Unfortunately, I still ended up buying handgun and .223 ammo every now and then. I just don’t have the available time to spend loading bulk plinking ammo. If your time is valuable and scarce, and you want to spend more time shooting than reloading or even just want to have more family time while still being able to enjoy your hobbies, get yourself a progressive press. I justified a Dillon 650 by future time saved. Absolutely worth the money.

For the beginner reloader, just be honest with yourself about how slow you’ll be able to go until you have the hang of the process. If you believe you can commit to being careful, slow, and safe, get the progressive. The time you save over the next 20-60 years will make the initial investment seem like peanuts.
 

SigSauerkraut

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If you're just doing pistol, look into the Dillon Square Deal. Once you get into a rhythm you can crank out the rounds pretty quick and reliably.
 
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culater

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I have always loaded with a rcbs single stage I was wanting a turret press just don’t know 5he difference and is it worth it over the single stage. I can’t justify the progressive .
Try loading a 1000 rds and see how long it takes you. After I’m done loading with my Dillon 550 I’ll be drinking a beer and watching a game by the time you get to the loading part. If you value your TIME you’ll go with a 550 or the new 750.
 

Winningdog

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Loading 9mm today on a single stage. Probably only get 300 loaded. Don't have any experience with progressive press, but I'm sure it would be faster.
 

Darkside-Six

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definitely a progressive press. I have the Hornady Lock n Load and it works well once you finally get it set up right. takes a bit of tinkering. i'm planning on upgrading to a dillon though.
 

patrick021

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If I decide to get a Dillion is the 650 what I need and what all do I need to get with it to load 9 mm?
 

SigSauerkraut

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It will come set up for one cartridge. You just need to supply the dies.

Like I mentioned above, if all you're doing is pistol in moderate quantities, then I wouldn't overlook the Square Deal. If you go with the 650, get the case feeder. I was faster on my Square Deal than I was on my 650 before I got the case feeder.
 
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Anb618

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Any 9mm dies?
You can use any dies, but the Dillon dies are intended for progressive use and “float” slightly to help align the brass and keep things running smoothly. After running a 650 with both Dillon (9mm and .40) and Lee (.45acp) pistol dies, I plan to buy Dillon dies to replace my Lee dies. The machine runs so much smoother with them and I don’t dent brass like will occasionally happen with my Lee dies.
 

Huskydriver

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Dillon Dillon Dillon yo.


Case feeder is a must imo. I your doing 9mm the bullet feeder is nice but not necessary to be fast
 

Middle Man

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Dual 650’s...one large primer, one small primer. Purchased both from fellow shooters that were downsizing...
 
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Southpaw Shooter

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I use to have a Dillon 550C and recently sold it, took all the fun out of reloading. I enjoy setting at my bench making rounds but with a fast press I'm done in 30 minuets and bored. Went back to a single stage and still trickle the powder for every single round.
 

Mr.Kirk

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I shoot about 300 per week and am happy with the Dillon 550. A lot of them pop up used at good prices when folks upgrade to bigger stuff. The 550 and 650 (now 750) are pretty standard for pistol shooters. I loaded 200 last night and it took me about 45 min with changing it from 223 and sorting everything out in my pig sty. Lots of support data to run the dillon right and a few upgraded available to make it run perfect.
 

reubenski

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I loaded pistol on a 550 for a number of years. Got a 650 two years ago and set it up with a bullet feeder. Pretty awesome way of loading. I've considered many times purchasing a 1050 and autodrive. The problem I always run into with that is the regular trouble shooting I have to do on the 650. Sometimes the bullet dropper hangs up and doesn't drop a bullet. Get the occasional bullet upside down, get the occasional swaged PP, get the occasional reduced charge inset brass(or whatever those things are called). As much as I like tweaking that stuff, I'm not sure the level of tweaking required to run an autodrive wouldn't be extremely frustrating
 
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99106

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I shoot a lot at times I’ll never load enough to put justify the Dillion I load May rifles in a single stage now
You seemed like you were waffling so more food for thought if you haven't decided. Turret saves a little time on die setup, but you're still single staging processes to some degree. Progessive will give you speed. Buy a used 650 or a new 750 which just recently replaced the 650. Make sure you get the case feeder with the small pistol plate. If you buy new you can call dillon and they will hook you up with right parts. If you get a used 650 and it might he sketchy you can always send it back to them for a refurb for not that much. If it is not set for 9mm, you need a caliber conversion kit and dies. Hopefully it has the powder bars. New one can be bought setup for 9mm, but dies are an add on or separate purchase.

If you only want to do just pistol then get the sqaure deal B, but note you have to used Dillon's proprietary dies. If you every see yourself doing rifle in bulk, then go the 650/750 route. One other thing about the B is you have to manually feed case into shell plate, where the 50s can do it by case feeder.

In general since you already reload I assume you have a scale, calipers and tumbler of some sort. You will need at a minimum to either buy Dillon 9mm dies if you go dillon or another mfgs set. I lean toward a carbide 3 die set with taper crimp, not roll crimp for semi auto pistols. The one thing no one has mentioned is a case checker gauge, these are invaluable, for setting up and checking once you load. Nothing like making up 500 rounds and then have to pull them because the sizing was off.

Last thought being save your money and just buy a Dillon. You won't regret it and the prices only keep going up, not to mention they do tend to hold their value fairly well if you take care of them.
 

Strykervet

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I believe you'll find the Dillon 550/650 the most popular progressive presses for handgun. It wouldn't take much research to prove this. This is from someone who has been shooting USPSA since it was IPSC.😁
Well, it's the Dillon 750 now. IMO it's never been a better time to get one too because you get all the upgrades on the new press now before the prices gradually go up over the years.

Same as 650 but it handles some larger rounds I believe.

650 will literally crank out pistol ammo, bulk rifle ammo and if you weigh each load vs. the dispenser you can get some fairly accurate loads fairly fast still.

You still want a single stage press, a basic one like the rock chucker, for pulling bullets, swaging, maybe punching primers or just a wanna run a small lot of something without changing over the 650/750. Also, a single stage press will help you learn the fundamentals of loading without weighing you down with a bunch of details specific to progressives. When you do get a progressive, all the stuff you learned on the single stage will be applicable.

So Dillon is best, but you need to start with a basic single stage IMO. You COULD get a turret but IMO it's a waste of money if you go progressive later.

Dillon's 550 may be a good compromise though, I'm not sure. I'm still a big fan of single stage first, then move on to more elaborate, and like I said, you'll always use that single stage anyway.

If you can get a single stage kit with the RCBS powder dispenser included, that's a good idea, I use the piss out of that thing and it's way better than a triple beam manual scale. Some complain of accuracy problems but there are a few tricks to iron those out and mine has always been fine.
 

Darayavaus

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You seemed like you were waffling so more food for thought if you haven't decided. Turret saves a little time on die setup, but you're still single staging processes to some degree. Progessive will give you speed. Buy a used 650 or a new 750 which just recently replaced the 650. Make sure you get the case feeder with the small pistol plate. If you buy new you can call dillon and they will hook you up with right parts. If you get a used 650 and it might he sketchy you can always send it back to them for a refurb for not that much. If it is not set for 9mm, you need a caliber conversion kit and dies. Hopefully it has the powder bars. New one can be bought setup for 9mm, but dies are an add on or separate purchase.

If you only want to do just pistol then get the sqaure deal B, but note you have to used Dillon's proprietary dies. If you every see yourself doing rifle in bulk, then go the 650/750 route. One other thing about the B is you have to manually feed case into shell plate, where the 50s can do it by case feeder.

In general since you already reload I assume you have a scale, calipers and tumbler of some sort. You will need at a minimum to either buy Dillon 9mm dies if you go dillon or another mfgs set. I lean toward a carbide 3 die set with taper crimp, not roll crimp for semi auto pistols. The one thing no one has mentioned is a case checker gauge, these are invaluable, for setting up and checking once you load. Nothing like making up 500 rounds and then have to pull them because the sizing was off.

Last thought being save your money and just buy a Dillon. You won't regret it and the prices only keep going up, not to mention they do tend to hold their value fairly well if you take care of them.
what's a used square deal worth? I have one that I never used and ought to just sell it rather than let it sit. It's set up for 9mm
 

99106

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Standard setup, single caliber without powder sensor, primer sensor, looks like $370-400.
 
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Darayavaus

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Standard setup, single caliber without powder sensor, primer sensor, looks like $370-400.
Sounds good! I was guessing about 375. I'll have to figure out how to put it in the classifieds.
 

Ankeny

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I started out on a Dillon 550B with the intention to upgrade. Tens upon tens of thousands of rounds later, I am still using my 550B. If you are happy cranking out 300-400 rounds an hour at a moderate pace, the 550 will get the job done.
 

Darayavaus

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I started out on a Dillon 550B with the intention to upgrade. Tens upon tens of thousands of rounds later, I am still using my 550B. If you are happy cranking out 300-400 rounds an hour at a moderate pace, the 550 will get the job done.
that many? even when you have to manually index it and set a new case and bullet with every crank?
 

JTinMO

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Agree with what Ankeny said. His timing is correct. a handle pull about every 10 seconds or so is very doable with the 550. I personally don't load that much as I don't have a ton of loaded primer tubes ready to roll, so only reload in batches of 200. But that only takes about 30 mins to get those done. I still worry about the charges and pull a couple out of 200 to check the powder weight, so I'm a little slower than some. I would rather be slower and correct, than have to pull hundreds of rounds when I finally see an issue. That 550 is always right on the money though. Been thoroughly impressed every step of the way with it. I still load my rifle rounds on the turret, but for all the pistol and .223, it gets done on the Dillon.