New from dead air silencers?

Kisssofdeath

Sergeant of the Hide
May 9, 2018
110
33
28
South Carolina
#5
I'm in the market for one more suppressor "have 3" and this next one I want to be able to shoot anything from my little 22 LR up to a 300 WSM. Doesn't matter how long or heavy it is, that's not a concern I have. For it to work with my 22 LR guns it must be servicable, preferably toolless. I want to use it as a direct thread by changing adapters within the suppressor. It essentially needs to be just like my AAC Ti-RANT 45M but expanded to shoot anything up to and including the 300 WSM, Win Mag or whatever. I don't think I will ever own a 338 LM or larger. If I do, I will deal with that later.

If anyone reads this and you already know of a suppressor like I am looking for please share. Now that I think about it, I believe I will make a new thread about what I am looking for.
 
Nov 10, 2009
271
108
43
Mississippi
#10
Looks interesting. If you're already using their key-mo system it looks to be a good option, but if not already using that system this doesn't give you a reason to change to it. Slightly shorter and lighter than Sandman S, and cheaper. I really like the cans coming out with the exterior weld design, instead of baffles in a sleeve. Less parts, more robust (IMO), and most of the time lighter and cheaper.

But one thing I think we can all agree on, the more options the better. Love that the market is expanding and innovating at such a rapid pace.


Edit: Well, it appears the Nomad ships with the direct thread end cap and no muzzle device. The Sandman S ships with key-mo adapter and muzzle device. So once you add that to the Nomad, it looks like it will be longer, heavier and more expensive than the Sandman S ($250 for key-mo adapter +$90 for muzzle device added to the cost of Nomad). Not sure why someone would choose it over Sandman S? Is there another difference/advantage to the Nomad that I'm missing?
 
Last edited:

SonicBurlap

New Hide Member
Aug 14, 2018
65
12
8
#11
If I'm going to break down and tackle the ATF wait and tax for a suppressor I'll go with one from Rebel Silencers so at least my wallet won't have to take the punishment I'm trying to avoid for my hearing. Their SOS-Creed for 6.5 Creedmoor is just $300 as is their SOS-Hunter for .30Cal. , and their SOS-Lapua is $350. They can be taken apart for cleaning easily too. I love Bergara because they produce quality for a fair price, but Dead Air Armaments, which belongs in that Dikar, BPI-Outdoors, Bergara, Quake, CVA, Durasight, Powerbelt Bullets conglomerate has their prices just a tad too far up there for my taste. Still holding out hopes for the Hearing Protection Act to pass one of these years so at least the government extortion tax and additional registration will be gone. Until then my custom hearing protection will do.
 
Nov 10, 2009
271
108
43
Mississippi
#12
Still holding out hopes for the Hearing Protection Act to pass one of these years so at least the government extortion tax and additional registration will be gone. Until then my custom hearing protection will do.
I wouldn't hold my breath. I think its pretty much dead.

As for cans, you get what you pay for, just like everything else.
 

SonicBurlap

New Hide Member
Aug 14, 2018
65
12
8
#13
Actually shot a Rebel Silencer at a friend's in Texas and heard same and felt the same as some of the Dead Air cans I got to try out. Doesn't really make a difference, love my hearing protection and for those prices I'd rather invest in some better glass. As for the Hearing Protection Act just like anything else it's dead if you don't harass your politicians about it; they're like cattle you have to prod and sometimes kick 'em while you're on your horse to get them to move into the direction you want them to go, otherwise they'll always go where the grass (or anything else) is greener.
 
#14
The new Dead Air Nomad 30. This is Dead Air Silencer's newest suppressor. Unlike the other Dead Air Silencer's, this is a tubeless design. It is also 1.73 inches in diameter which makes it a little thicker than other suppressors from Dead Air. The Nomad incorporates a new ebrake system that reduces the sound and flash signature at the muzzle.
I am hoping this EBrake will work on the Sandman L
In my opinion, the most important aspects of this new suppressor are;
1. Construction. Short compact efficient tubeless construction. The tubeless design is a first for Dead Air and I am happy to see them going in this direction.
2. Weight. 14 oz is right in the middle of its target market segment weight-wise.
3. Marerials. The suppressor does not use exotic titanium materials. In my mind, accomplishing this with not exotic materials is a huge Plus.
4. End cap configurations. The modular end cap system lets the user switch between different aperture end caps to different styles of brakes. This allows the user to tune the suppressor to the particular application and caliber.
5.56FH
6.5
7.62
7.62FH
The eBrake
5. Mount compatibility. The Nomad's compatibility with multiple mounting systems is astounding and a welcome feature in the market. Anything that works with the Keymo Mount system and the ASR would work with the Dead Air Nomad. This opens up a whole world of Mounting Solutions depending on what the purchaser has already invested in.
1/2 x 28
5/8 x 24
Key Mo
ASR
Area 417
Q Cherry Bomb
A few others
6. Suppression. The numbers indicate this silencer will perform at least as well as an Omega if not better. Chasing decibels is generally not the most important aspect of selecting a silencer. In this case, the numbers that I am seeing indicate that it performs as well or better than an Omega across the board.
7. I like longer suppressors. The reason I like longer suppressors is that they are generally noticeably quieter. It looks like this suppressor is going to be short and quiet.
I am sure we will see more independent testing in the very near future. The new ebrake in cap also has a effect on the suppression efficiency of the silencer. That makes that a great option.
Credit to @recoilmagazine and @allyoutfitters for the photo.
Nomad 30 Specifications:
Length: 6.5”
Diameter: 1.735”
Weight: 14 oz
MSRP: $916
 

NAS78

New Hide Member
Oct 4, 2018
7
2
3
#16
Unless you're vested in key-mo I still think the Vox is a better option. When comparing the vox and nomad both in DT form, the vox is $145 cheaper, 2oz lighter, and also takes ASR modules and Q plan B
 

SonicBurlap

New Hide Member
Aug 14, 2018
65
12
8
#18
on the REbel Silencers . . . a big Nope
A 'big Nope' based on what? Have you shot a Rebel Silencer? Their design is also tubeless. It doesn't accommodate several different calibers but at the lesser price it doesn't need to; I would actually prefer a suppressor made specifically for the caliber of my rifle. If you already own a Sandman then I can understand why you might not want to consider anything else yet, others who don't have any brand attachment might think different. A scope I can see costing as much as a rifle; a can not so much. Nope. I'm not claiming to be an expert on Rebel Silencers. I liked my friend's but that doesn't necessarily mean I'm convinced, however if you have info about the quality of these suppressors that is based on some kind of experience, or evidence that should give anyone here pause before they would decide to buy one it would be nice if you could share a little more info than just 'a big Nope.'
 
#19
A 'big Nope' based on what? Have you shot a Rebel Silencer? Their design is also tubeless. It doesn't accommodate several different calibers but at the lesser price it doesn't need to; I would actually prefer a suppressor made specifically for the caliber of my rifle. If you already own a Sandman then I can understand why you might not want to consider anything else yet, others who don't have any brand attachment might think different. A scope I can see costing as much as a rifle; a can not so much. Nope. I'm not claiming to be an expert on Rebel Silencers. I liked my friend's but that doesn't necessarily mean I'm convinced, however if you have info about the quality of these suppressors that is based on some kind of experience, or evidence that should give anyone here pause before they would decide to buy one it would be nice if you could share a little more info than just 'a big Nope.'
The rebel sucks. There have been numerous issues with them POI issues, construction issues. The design sucks. The engineering sucks. there are other cheap cans that are much better cans.

Friends don't let Friends by Rebel silencers.
 

Gtscotty

New Hide Member
Jul 22, 2018
31
31
18
#20
Unless you're vested in key-mo I still think the Vox is a better option. When comparing the vox and nomad both in DT form, the vox is $145 cheaper, 2oz lighter, and also takes ASR modules and Q plan B
I've been eyeing the Vox as well, I really like how light and short it is, and the engineer in me nerds out over the fact that it's made from maraging steel. That said, I still haven't seen any decent meter numbers for the Vox on a generic standard, say a 20" .308. On the other hand, the published numbers for the Nomad actually look pretty strong for it's length and weight. If the Vox winds up metering in the same general range, it would kind of kill some of the draw of the Nomad.

I will say that I understand why manufacturers are going to larger diameter cans, and appreciate that it doesn't really make a difference if you're shooting an AR or chassis, but on my hunting rifles with very low mounted scopes, the fatter suppressors start to intrude into my low mag view more than I'd like. My Liberty Sovereign is 1.625", and while it works well for me, if it were any wider I think it would bother me on some of my rifles. From that perspective, slightly narrower, light, short cans like the Vox, Omega, and Ultra 7 look pretty good.
 

SonicBurlap

New Hide Member
Aug 14, 2018
65
12
8
#23
The rebel sucks. There have been numerous issues with them POI issues, construction issues. The design sucks. The engineering sucks. there are other cheap cans that are much better cans.

Friends don't let Friends by Rebel silencers.
Thanks! At least now I have a little bit more to tell my friend in Texas than "Dude, the suppressor you bought is a 'Big Nope' because it just sucks." I guess I was lucky when I shot his rifle with it, and so has he been until now. Still not quite sure how to convince him.
 

Gtscotty

New Hide Member
Jul 22, 2018
31
31
18
#24
If I were trying to stay in the $300-$400 range, I'd probably lean towards the YHMs, specifically the Turbo or Resonator. Good materials, good sound suppression, good CS, not too heavy and decent attachment system.

I certainly wouldn't make price my main metric on a suppressor purchase. Any can you buy is basically yours for life, it's worth buying what you really want. This is especially true with all the great cans that can be found for under $1k or even $800 now, what will a few hundred dollars saved mean to you after waiting 6-12 months for your stamp?

On a certain AR themed forum it's been stated that the Vox is, on average, 1 db quieter than the Sandman S, while the Nomad is "a few" dB quieter. It doesn't sound like there's a huge difference, but hopefully independent testing will paint a clearer picture.
 
Last edited:
Nov 10, 2009
271
108
43
Mississippi
#25
If I were trying to stay in the $300-$400 range, I'd probably lean towards the YHMs, specifically the Turbo or Resonator. Good materials, good sound suppression, good CS, not too heavy and decent attachment system.
I'm a big fan of YHM's new stuff from the last 2 years or so, the Nitro, Turbo, and Resonator. All are great. Price is good, material is good, design (tubeless), and I love their mounting system, even use it on an omega.

Can get the Turbo, .223, for under $400, comes with a muzzle device. And the Resonator, 30 cal, for under $500, with a muzzle device. Both are full auto rated, barrel length restrictions are pretty lenient, and 30 cal is rated through 300 ultra mag.
 
Top Bottom