Neck turning question

SparkyHD1

New Hide Member
Mar 1, 2018
35
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#1
I'm just learning how to neck turn so I'm practicing on some old brass.
So some info-
I'm turning 28 nosler
I expended the necks with a .283 mandrel.
The pilot mandrel on my K&m is .282
My question is, how tight of a fit should I have on the Turner mandrel?
I have a really tight fit, almost seams to tight?
Sorry if this a stupid question. I'm just trying to gain some confidence in what I'm doing.
 
Feb 13, 2017
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Camano Island, Washington
#3
I'm just learning how to neck turn so I'm practicing on some old brass.
So some info-
I'm turning 28 nosler
I expended the necks with a .283 mandrel.
The pilot mandrel on my K&m is .282
My question is, how tight of a fit should I have on the Turner mandrel?
I have a really tight fit, almost seams to tight?
Sorry if this a stupid question. I'm just trying to gain some confidence in what I'm doing.
I'd have to go out and measure all my stuff to say for sure, but generally speaking, you want just enough tension so that the neck doesn't slop around on the pilot of the cutter. I neck size fired brass and don't use a resizer/mandrel. Soooo........I'd say the mandrel of the die should be somewhere between the same size, to a thou under the size of the pilot of the cutter. Be sure and use plenty of lube (Imperial sizing die wax) on the pilot and the inside of the neck. If you don't already have it, get yourself a Mitutoyo tube/ball/anvil micromometer, it's the shizzle (cry once. It can be had cheaper from others besides Brownell's);

https://www.brownells.com/reloading...y&utm_campaign=itwine&utm_content=749-008-073

With time, you'll develop a feel for what works best dimensionally. Also, don't be in a hurry. If you use a drill motor with shell plate clamp (which you should), go slow enough to keep the heating of the pilot and brass down. The higher the heat, the more everything grows and you will end up with necks that have too much material taken off. It's not a quick process. Be patient, you'll do fine. If you don't already have a turner, I highly recommend K&M, they're very nice.
 
Last edited:
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SparkyHD1

New Hide Member
Mar 1, 2018
35
9
8
#4
Thanks for the info.
I've been coating the mandrel with imperial sizing wax?
I've watched some videos where they used dry lube?
I'm using a cordless drill (very slow)
I've read some conflicting information, some people say to cut slightly into the shoulder and some people say to stop short?
 

spife7980

Full Member
Feb 10, 2017
3,387
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TX
#6
Cut into the shoulder if you have an angled cutter. If not stop at the base of the neck. If you don’t cut the shoulder a tad though it can migrate forward after a few sizing cycles giving you thicker brass again. If you seat your bullet far enough forward though you might not ever encounter that thicker shoulder brass migration and so stopping short with a 90 degree cutter will be fine.
 
May 18, 2009
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England, ar
#7
First of all, its not a stupid question. Everyone that turns case necks had to learn.
I try to buy cutters that are ground to match the shoulder angle. I'll just barely touch the shoulder with the cutting edge. Your turning mandrel needs to be tight enough not to wobble and a drop of lube helps. Stick with the same brand expanding mandrel and turning mandrel. The carbide ones are nice but expensive! There is some good info on both Varmint Al's site and on the Accurateshooter.com site.
If you are turning for a factory rifle, don't take off too much material. Maybe just clean up 50-75% of the neck.
 
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