Navy Seal Witch hunt

ArmyJerry

Staff Sergeant
Nov 22, 2012
6,783
6,340
113
#2
Well the Geneva=a convention says he could kill the insurgent if the guy wasn’t wearing a nation state military uniform, I never seen a problem killing your enemy,
 
Likes: Yasherka
Feb 15, 2017
2,146
2,111
113
#3
Virtually no details in the case . Seems the lawyer is being stone walled . How do you defend without discovery and review . Legal precedent gives the Lawyer access to everything as there have been quite a few enemy combatants tried in civilian courts . Is Iraq a. Signateur of any War or Hyman Rights Treaties ? If not fuck off .
I get the need for UCMJ but , aghh to lttle details . Stand tall Squid .
 

Tucker301

Groundskeeper
Staff member
Feb 13, 2015
7,383
4,944
113
Southern VA
#4
https://navy-seals-fund.networkforg...ense-needs-for-navy-seal-fighting-for-justice


19 Year Service Member

Joined July 28th 1999

Marine Corps

Medic/Corpsman for platoon

7 month Combat Deployment - 2000 Deployment – Mediterranean/Kosovo

Sea Service Deployment Ribbon

Marine Corps

Sniper/Corpsman

Marine Corps Water Instructor Survival Specialist - MCWISS

Marine Corps

9 month combat Deployment during invasion of – Mosul/Africa 2003

Marine Corpsman/Medic/Sniper

Combat Action Ribbon

Basic Underwater Demolition/ NSWC - 2004

SEAL Qualification Training Graduation 2005

SEALTEAM ONE - 2005

18 Delta Field Medic Course - 2005

SEAL Team One

Special Operator 2nd Class - SO2

Plt Medic, Sniper, Corpsman

2 Troop Delta PLT

Combat deployed to Iraq 2006-2007

Navy commendation medal with V for Valor / combat action ribbon / Iraqi campaign / Afghanistan Campaign /Sea Service Deployment Ribbon

SEAL Team One

Special Operator 1st Class – SO1

Lead Sniper / Platoon Medic / Lead Breacher / Fire Team Leader

2 troop Delta platoon,

Combat Deployment – Afghanistan 2009-2010

Combat Action / Afghanistan Campaign / Bronze Star with V for Valor

Naval Special warfare Center BUDS Instructor

Master Training Specialist

Special Operator 1st class,

2010-2012

SEAL Team Seven -2012-2017

Special Operator 1st class, SO1

2 troop, Delta platoon

Squad leader, lead sniper, Lead breacher, fire team leader, Lead Corpsman

Combat Deployment - Afghanistan 2013

Army commendation medal, Navy Commendation Medal, Combat action ribbon with gold star insignia for multiple combat deployments,

SEAL Team 7

Charlie Platoon– Lead Petty Officer of plt, SO1

Crisis Response element

Deployment United Arab Emeritus – 2014-2015

Navy Commendation medal

ST7 – Sailor of the quarter

ST7 – Sailor of the year

Group One- Sailor of the year

Number one E6 at Command

SEAL Team 7

Alpha Platoon – Special Operator Chief, E-7

Combat Deployment – Mosul, 2016-2017

Number one Chief at ST7 Command

Awards:

2 Bronze Stars with V for Valor

Meritorious Unit Commendation

Presidential Unit Citation

2 Navy Commendation Medals

3 Navy and Marine Corps Achievement Medals – 1 with V for Valor

4 Good conduct awards
 

diverdon

Constitutionalist, by choice
Dec 21, 2011
3,298
1,640
113
WNY
#9
If it comes down to it, perhaps Trump could pardon him.
Should President Trump become aware of this situation he could simply use his position as CIC to stop it in its tracks. I like how they use the cover that he might be a threat to himself or others as an excuse for pretrial confinement. If they had not wanted him to be a threat to "others" perhaps they should not have had armed agents drag his children from his home in their underwear at gun point. That would be real hard for me to forgive.

I was in the Navy, yet today I do not advise anyone who seeks my advice to join the military, mostly because of stuff like this.
 

ArmyJerry

Staff Sergeant
Nov 22, 2012
6,783
6,340
113
#14
more needs to be done to fix this issue, our brass sucks cock, literally, they are now fellow travelers with no goddamn spine, they have been kowtowed into PCdom and will sacrifice whole armies on its petard. We need to root out any and all officers appointed or nominated by a democrat or republican, they are all suspect.


If it comes down to it, perhaps Trump could pardon him.
 
Likes: diverdon

Tucker301

Groundskeeper
Staff member
Feb 13, 2015
7,383
4,944
113
Southern VA
#18
I saw on another site that they were saying he had opiates (prescription) and steroids in his house on the first search warrant. That seemed to be more smear propaganda than charges though. Someone inside ratted him out on the killing of the detainee and telling others to keep quiet about it.
 
Aug 24, 2010
4,924
2,063
113
Northeast Wyoming
#25
When it comes to the Laws of War, I'm staunchly against blatant violations. Killing wounded enemy who are no longer a perceived threat, even more so the unnecessary yet deliberate killing of noncombatants, is always unacceptable. Anytime there is valid evidence atrocities were committed, a thorough investigation and prosecution needs to be conducted.

At the same time, I am staunchly against the overreaching of command authority in the prosecution of violations and JAG shenanigans which tilts the balance of justice all the way in their favor, as was very evident in the infamous Taliban pissing case where CMC went way overboard by illegally influencing the prosecution and initiating a kangaroo court where no defense was possible. This case also smells of the same.

A defendant deserves a quality defense in accordance with the UCMJ, and their lawyer(s) deserve access to any and all information that relates to the case, or they deserve a valid reason and alternative if that is not possible ( i.e. classification of operations and a lawyer who cannot possess a clearance). Hampering a defense is cause for dismissal of charges, even if the accused is guilty as sin in reality.
 

Culpeper

One divided by F
Nov 25, 2006
2,384
773
113
59
Roswell NM
#26
+10

The Navy went so far in the case against the captain of CA-35 as to include the Japanese submarine captain that sunk her in their joy to prosecute him. This was after he was issued a Letter of Reprimand. The Navy eats it's own.

As for ISIS combatants, what happens on the battlefield stays on it. Fuck those animals. They never heard of the Geneva Convention.
 

diverdon

Constitutionalist, by choice
Dec 21, 2011
3,298
1,640
113
WNY
#28
When it comes to the Laws of War, I'm staunchly against blatant violations. Killing wounded enemy who are no longer a perceived threat, even more so the unnecessary yet deliberate killing of noncombatants, is always unacceptable. Anytime there is valid evidence atrocities were committed, a thorough investigation and prosecution needs to be conducted.

At the same time, I am staunchly against the overreaching of command authority in the prosecution of violations and JAG shenanigans which tilts the balance of justice all the way in their favor, as was very evident in the infamous Taliban pissing case where CMC went way overboard by illegally influencing the prosecution and initiating a kangaroo court where no defense was possible. This case also smells of the same.

A defendant deserves a quality defense in accordance with the UCMJ, and their lawyer(s) deserve access to any and all information that relates to the case, or they deserve a valid reason and alternative if that is not possible ( i.e. classification of operations and a lawyer who cannot possess a clearance). Hampering a defense is cause for dismissal of charges, even if the accused is guilty as sin in reality.
I agree with everything you said, yet I think a lot of it is a little too lumped together. You say " Killing wounded enemy who are no longer a perceived threat" Observing the thousands of medals nearly every nation has given to soldiers who were wounded but stayed in the fight and went on to protect their fellows and kill their enemies. Yet the way you say it kinda leads the mind that perhaps in this case the enemy wounded was no longer a threat. Many jurors hearing and agreeing with that logic would assume that killing a wounded man was indeed murder. I would strongly disagree. Unless he had surrendered or was unconscious he was still a threat. If he was still a threat thank god our guy killed him instead of letting him kill us. Not that the lawyers or the judge advocate give a flying fuck.
 

Fig

Janitor of the Hide
Mar 15, 2018
2,189
3,199
113
The Most Dangerous City in the USA
#29
To me lawyers have no place on the battlefield, period. The real criminal here is the buddy fucking rat who ratted. He should have his security clearance revoked and frog marched out of The Teams. He should have DORed at the garrote training if he couldn't accept premeditated and organized killing. It turn in your buddy, who's valor has saved your teammates (and possibly even you) in the past, is inconceivable. Second guessing a soldier on the battlefield is something I could not possibly muster the hypocrisy and self-righteousness to even begin to do,

I don't give a fuck about Taliban or Isis jihadists. The only reason not to kill them is to squeeze information out of them so you can find and kill more of them.

I'm in too. Fuck these bastards. He's sacrificed far too much for us already. I don't care if he's guilty. 0FsG.
 
Aug 24, 2010
4,924
2,063
113
Northeast Wyoming
#30
I agree with everything you said, yet I think a lot of it is a little too lumped together. You say " Killing wounded enemy who are no longer a perceived threat" Observing the thousands of medals nearly every nation has given to soldiers who were wounded but stayed in the fight and went on to protect their fellows and kill their enemies. Yet the way you say it kinda leads the mind that perhaps in this case the enemy wounded was no longer a threat. Many jurors hearing and agreeing with that logic would assume that killing a wounded man was indeed murder. I would strongly disagree. Unless he had surrendered or was unconscious he was still a threat. If he was still a threat thank god our guy killed him instead of letting him kill us. Not that the lawyers or the judge advocate give a flying fuck.
I wasn't muddled in what I said; perhaps didn't expand enough, but I was pretty clear where the line exists. "No longer a perceived threat" is black and white: they're either a threat or they are not. Typically on the battlefield, that perception falls upon the man who is making their own assessment of the situation and acting upon that decision, and while there's a lot of leeway to not second guess someone in the heat of battle (remember the Marine in the mosque in Fallujah in '04, no charges for him), there's still not a free for all to kill anyone you want while saying "Hmph, he was a threat..." when it's obvious zero threat exists.

The accused deserve their day in court, with as strong of a defense as they can muster for themselves, and they deserve be able to explain their actions before a jury of their peers for them to decide what was right and wrong. If I was on that jury, you'd have a hard time convincing me there wasn't still a threat, but I'd also call it a murder if there is enough evidence to that.
 
Feb 21, 2017
149
18
18
South Dakota
#33
Just donated. Pretty easy process. Hope it helps. Looking for a happy ending here. We need more proud Americans like him. Sounds like a smear deal to me. Whatever happened he deserves a fair trial and the benefit of the doubt at the cery least. From his resume he is owed respect and shouldn’t be shit on like a common criminal.
 
Likes: diverdon

Blutroop

Sergeant of the Hide
Oct 25, 2018
131
105
43
Alaska
#37
I’m to broke to donate but wanted to bump. No one should have their children drug out of their house at gunpoint in their underwear. And did anyone else notice the irony that they actually arrested him on.. 9/11 nics should be lined up and let all his buddies have their way with em.
 
Likes: Fig
Aug 24, 2010
4,924
2,063
113
Northeast Wyoming
#39
Those are some pretty serious accusations, particularly knifing a 15 y/o to death while he's being triaged and it being well after the battle... Even still though, he deserves his day in court with a proper defense. I'd rather see him (or everyone else, as the case may be) man the fuck up and tell the truth, then face the music as it may be.

Funny how rare that actually happens these days.
 
Likes: schmi015
Aug 24, 2010
4,924
2,063
113
Northeast Wyoming
#41
I don't think it's a SEAL problem alone, more a SOCOM/JSOC problem of them believing their own bullshit. Stuff like this happens from the top down, and every service has/is experiencing serious command issues at the field grade and higher levels. It's one thing to have a culture of steely eyed killers who are God's gift to warfare, it's another to have a culture of thinking you're untouchable and that the rules don't apply to you. While I readily admit those men (and even a few women) are put in unbelievable situations that can cause them to crack or get warped from the throes of continuous battle, resulting in them do things that a normal American would never do otherwise, the follow-on coverup act negates that explanation in my mind as they knew right from wrong.

I was just an infantryman and HOG who never served in anything "cooler" than a Victor unit (regular infantry Bn), we still started falling into believing our own bullshit from time to time only to have the XO or SgtMaj bitch slap us back into reality. I cussed those belt fed-iron sight regular infantry types back then in young and dumb angst, yet in my later years I'm a bit grateful for the body check that kept me from seeing a serious charge sheet I would still regret to this day.

I'm all for supporting our warriors, obviously, but just like a spouse or a kid that support is not unconditional. Act like a shit head, get treated like a shit head because actions have consequences.
 

pmclaine

Gunny Sergeant
Nov 6, 2011
7,875
4,642
113
50
MA
#43
I think there is a real problem with command.

An infiltration has occurred.

Why is it McCraven will call Trump a threat to the First Amendment, sure he is combative but he also gives access, yet Obama that used his fellow travelers to shut down Sheryl Atkisson or used the Justus Dept to surveil James Rosen or just refused to give access or controlled access through prior negotiation, and McCraven said nothing?

Fuck where was McCraven when the IRS was used to shut down the Tea Party? Fast and Furious didnt bother him.

Now we have the courts saying the President has no power to conduct his number one executive responsibility - enforce our laws.

Gen Neller the USMC Commandant that doesnt seem capable of hiding his contempt for an elected leader.

Adm Mike Rodgers may have been the only true patriot but he is only seen on milk cartons these days.

Leadership has been corrupted, the fish is rotting from the head down, I see it in my life, I see it nationally, I see it in the attitudes of man on the street - Fuck it everyone is being criminal why shouldnt I?
 

pmclaine

Gunny Sergeant
Nov 6, 2011
7,875
4,642
113
50
MA
#44
This is from Adm Rodgers wiki sheet

Note the last two paragraphs and its apparent why the establishment hates him, why I like him....

In January 2014, the Obama Administration announced Rogers' nomination as director of the National Security Agency and the commander of the United States offensive cyberoperations unit in the Department of Defense. Rogers succeeded General Keith B. Alexander, who served as the NSA director for nine years,[10][11][12] and became the first IWC officer to achieve the rank of admiral. Although the NSA directorship does not require Senate approval, Rogers had to be confirmed by the Senate to head United States Cyber Command,[13] for which the Senate unanimously confirmed him.

In his first public remarks as NSA director, Rogers stated that he believed that NSA whistleblower Edward Snowden was "probably not" working for a foreign intelligence agency, despite frequent speculation and assertion by the NSA's allies to the contrary. Rogers added: "He clearly believes in what he's doing. I question that; I don't agree with it. I fundamentally disagree with what he did. I believe it was wrong; I believe it was illegal."[14]

The Washington Post reported on 19 November 2016 that Defense Secretary Ashton B. Carter and Director of National Intelligence (DNI) James R. Clapper, Jr. had sometime earlier in the year recommended to President Obama that Rogers be terminated as director of the National Security Agency.[15] Carter reportedly recommended he be terminated due to poor performance, whereas Clapper considered it wise that the position be held by a civilian.[15] Both Clapper and Carter had put Rogers on notice for poor performance in internal security and leadership style.[15] His termination was reportedly delayed due to stalled changes to the bureaucratic structure of the intelligence community.[15] Before the recommendation of firing was made, Rogers met with then President-elect Donald Trump without notifying his superiors.[16] Trump was reportedly considering replacing Clapper with Rogers as DNI, however that position went to former Senator Dan Coats, with Rogers remaining NSA director.[15]