Mount Scope

Smoov82

Sergeant of the Hide
Feb 5, 2018
120
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Villa Grove IL
#1
Hope this is the correct thread?! Stupid question, right?!

Have a SWFA SS HD 5-20x50 scope. RPR 6.5 Creedmoor on way! Question I have is how to properly mount scope? I’ve read forums and watched vids on mounting scopes. I’ve seen all types of gear to buy to do this. Just didn’t know if all the gear suggested was a must. Don’t want to cut corners but rather spend money on ammo at this point. Any help would be appreciated! Below is what I’ve seen pop up the most. The tools below a must have?

Gun Vise
Wheeler level
Wheeler Alignment Bars
Bore Site
Loctite
Torque Wrench

Thanks!
 

Badfinger

Sergeant of the Hide
Aug 11, 2013
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#2
I bought the Wheeler Kit and it comes with everything you need to do it right including a video. I lap my rings but some don't they just mount them. You don't need vise I work off a cradle but you can also use your bipod to set the gun up. I don't use a bore sight just remove the bolt
and look through the bore at a target about 25yds away and line your scope up to it. This should get you on the paper. I would at least buy a Wheeler Fat wrench you'll need it to properly torque screws without messing them up.
 
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vh20

Gunny Sergeant
Dec 2, 2012
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#5
Good quality rings don't need lapping, and many will void the warranty if you do. A Fat Wrench is a decent low-cost torque wrench and will do the job, definitely needed. A set of feeler gauges from the auto parts store will run 5 or 6 bucks and probably do a better job of leveling than the Wheeler levels. Cross check with a plumb line at 50 to 100 yds. Boresight a bolt action with your eyeballs looking down the bore from the breech.

edit: Sorry, Badfinger. I just re-read and need to say I didn't aim this at you. I see no problem with lapping them if you feel you must, but we really don't need to with good quality rings nowadays.
 
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TacticalDillhole

Standby to get some
Jun 26, 2012
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#6
Good quality rings don't need lapping, and many will void the warranty if you do. A Fat Wrench is a decent low-cost torque wrench and will do the job, definitely needed. A set of feeler gauges from the auto parts store will run 5 or 6 bucks and probably do a better job of leveling than the Wheeler levels. Cross check with a plumb line at 50 to 100 yds. Boresight a bolt action with your eyeballs looking down the bore from the breech.

edit: Sorry, Badfinger. I just re-read and need to say I didn't aim this at you. I see no problem with lapping them if you feel you must, but we really don't need to with good quality rings nowadays.
Agreed, that’s why I use badger kit mostly. Quality is exceptional. If they need to be lapped, you should send the. Back and buy new ones from a reputable manufacturer.
 

Apnea

learning
Sep 17, 2017
254
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CA
#7
Is it safe to assume that scopes made in US or Japan will have flat underside of turret box square to reticle?
 

Badfinger

Sergeant of the Hide
Aug 11, 2013
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#9
My first PR rings were Vortex and they had to be lapped, your YMMV.

vh20 no offense taken, I'm only giving my experience.

edit: I believe Seekins makes Vortex rings.
 
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Smoov82

Sergeant of the Hide
Feb 5, 2018
120
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Villa Grove IL
#11
Was reading and people were saying bore scope in long hallway or backyard. Once you’re on target through bore and scope at 25 yards, adjust/tweak on range say 100 yards?
 
Jan 1, 2014
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NoVa
#13
the only thing i've used on the OP's list is loctite (blue). i use two levels, one on gun (flat spot such as receiver rail, or if none, i plumb the buttstock screws, then 2nd level on top of scope turret. i put on front bipod and/or use a woodworking clamp on the stock to steady the gun and/or get it plumb as needed. look thru the barrel at 25-100 yd object and center the scope to it.
 

Apnea

learning
Sep 17, 2017
254
77
28
CA
#14
the vortex, leupold and bushnell scopes I have handled have all been flat on the underside.
Sorry, that might not read the way I intended. I meant: is that flat spop reliably square with reticle/tracking on decent glass?

I really don't know the answer?
 
#16
Sorry, that might not read the way I intended. I meant: is that flat spop reliably square with reticle/tracking on decent glass?
I follow you and they should be square in theory; however no matter which way you choose to level the scope, it should be used as a starting point until you put some rounds down range to verify it.

here is a link to help gather more information: https://www.snipershide.com/snipers-hide-leveling-your-scope/
 

Smoov82

Sergeant of the Hide
Feb 5, 2018
120
25
28
Villa Grove IL
#17
Still a little confused after watching video. Sorry! Newbie!

Start at bottom mil of paper with center of scope. One shot per mil dot working up. Then what? What does level have to do with the process after target is level?

Thanks
 

mheimer_45

Full Member
May 19, 2013
246
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NW Kansas
#18
What’s wrong with buying a set of quality rings and using supplied wrench to tighten and mount scope. How much does all this fancy stuff affect your accuracy? Enlighten me please. And I’ve always leveled to MY eyes and MY eyes alone. All that matters is the the scope is level when I hold the gun.
 

Gray Squirrel

Protect the nuts.
Jun 30, 2012
117
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North TX
#20
What’s wrong with buying a set of quality rings and using supplied wrench to tighten and mount scope. How much does all this fancy stuff affect your accuracy? Enlighten me please. And I’ve always leveled to MY eyes and MY eyes alone. All that matters is the the scope is level when I hold the gun.
It’s best to use some simple tools to ensure that your scope is mounted level for long distance shooting. If your scope is mounted with a slight cant, when you are adjusting the scope settings, the reticle is not moving straight up and down or left and right, it will move at a slight angle due to the cant. While the difference will not be noticed at shorter ranges, you could easily miss the target out further.

If you have a scope that does not have adjustable turrets (other than zeroing your scope), hunting scopes for example, then it’s not as important since the reticle will not be moving.

It’s the same concept as MOA. 1 MOA becomes a larger measurement the further you go out. If you have a slight cant, the measurement for the correction becomes larger (and therefore more noticeable) the further you go out.

Our eyes are good for getting into the ball park, but can not detect a subtle scope cant.
 
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Sheldon N

Blind Squirrel Finds a Nut
Sep 24, 2014
2,801
698
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Pacific Northwest
#21
Gun Vise
Wheeler level
Wheeler Alignment Bars
Bore Site
Loctite
Torque Wrench
No, No, No, No and Yes a Wheeler torque wrench for the ring screws.

Get some quality rings that don't need lapping, ie. Seekins Rings or the Vortex PMR rings (the ones made by Seekins, not the ones shown above). You can usually find a used set around $100. If you want to spend a bit more the ARC M-10 rings are awesome.

If you want to level the gun to the scope use a deck of playing cards between the rail and the base of the scope. What's more important is that your scope is level when you shoot. Option 1 is put a bubble level on the scope and level the reticle to a plumb line. Option 2 (if you're not going to put a level on the scope) is to just get the rifle comfortable in your shoulder so that when you get on the rifle the reticle is naturally level to gravity, checked with a plumb line. You'll have to test this a bunch to know you've got it right, get on the gun with your eyes closed, get comfy, then open eyes and check against plumb line. Best option IMO is combination of 1 and 2. Bubble level set for gravity, rifle set up to suit your natural point of aim.

Again... scope reticle is level to gravity when you shoot. Not level to your eye or just to the rifle or off the base of the turret. Level to gravity which is what affects the bullet. Same position, every time you shoot.

Tall target test is to make sure that your reticle isn't crooked relative to the movement of the crosshairs when you dial elevation, and to check that your tracking and elevation travel is accurate.
 
Likes: Smoov82
May 17, 2017
220
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Maryland
#22
My first PR rings were Vortex and they had to be lapped, your YMMV.

vh20 no offense taken, I'm only giving my experience.

edit: I believe Seekins makes Vortex rings.
Seekins manufactures the Vortex Precision Matched Rings. It looks like the ones pictured are the Vortex Tactical Rings which are made in China and no doubt benefited from lapping.

With respect to scope leveling (to add to Sheldon N's post), the entire point of leveling the scope is to have the vertical reticle plumb with true vertical. Easiest route is to hang a weighted plumb line from a target stand then align the vertical reticle to that plumb line. If you have a scope mounted bubble level/anti-cant device, set the bubble to level after aligning the vertical reticle to the plumb line.
 
Dec 16, 2017
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#23
Have the wheeler kit as well. Also bought some other similar levels. Use a combination of whichever levels seem to best fit with the rifle. For leveling I just crank down on the bipod lock to keep it from moving.

I figure the plumb line method is quick, but how would you know if you move the scope when tightening the rings? I don't have a long distance to work with in the garage (even looking out of the garage) so its not he best option for my situation.
 
May 17, 2017
220
55
28
Maryland
#24
Have the wheeler kit as well. Also bought some other similar levels. Use a combination of whichever levels seem to best fit with the rifle. For leveling I just crank down on the bipod lock to keep it from moving.

I figure the plumb line method is quick, but how would you know if you move the scope when tightening the rings? I don't have a long distance to work with in the garage (even looking out of the garage) so its not he best option for my situation.
Set the eye relief first, then put a small piece of painters tape on the scope at one of the rings as a fore-aft index mark in case the scope gets bumped as you are setting up.

Tighten scope ring screws just short of them applying grip on the scope. Get prone or on a bench and align vertical reticle with your plumb line. Tighten one ring screw just enough to grip the scope and double check against your plumb line. If you need to adjust, loosen that one ring screw and re-level. Finish by torquing all screws to spec. With a little care, it's easy to tighten the scope after setting level without disturbing the scope.