Motivational Pic Thread v2.0 - - New Rules - See Post #1

DarnYankeeUSMC

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Mar 18, 2012
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The wife and I finished the break down of the 455. The block and crank are ready to go to the machine shop. A couple of the rod bearings had a small gouge but the crank looks good. I'll probably let the shop decide what to do with it.
The woman doesn't mind turning wrenches. Here she's pulling a rod cap. I pulled the first two pistons and she was not happy standing around. She stepped in and finished them.
MVIMG_20190819_191838.jpg

IMG_20190819_191437.jpg
 

sirhrmechanic

Command Sgt. Major
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Feb 23, 2010
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The Snobbiest Town in The Snobbiest State in the N
The wife and I finished the break down of the 455. The block and crank are ready to go to the machine shop. A couple of the rod bearings had a small gouge but the crank looks good. I'll probably let the shop decide what to do with it.
The woman doesn't mind turning wrenches. Here she's pulling a rod cap. I pulled the first two pistons and she was not happy standing around. She stepped in and finished them.
View attachment 7133223

View attachment 7133227
As far in that as you are, go to the next .005 or .010 size on a crank grind and put in new bearings. No point in going that deep and not doing crank and mains/rods.

Nice job! Gonna be a powerhouse!!!

Sirhr
 

jrassy

Grunt
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My first car was a 69 Road Runner. I bought it with the money I made bucking bales, mowing lawns and shoveling snow. Imagine a 14 year old kid in 1974 driving around in a Red 69 Road Runner, 383, 4 spd, air grabber hood, with Magnum 500's and a factory AM/8-track stereo.
In 1974 I had a 69 Dodge Charger 440 magnum,AT, loved it, I was 18 and in the Marines in California
 

sirhrmechanic

Command Sgt. Major
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The Snobbiest Town in The Snobbiest State in the N
I talked with a 40 plus year retired industrial hygienist for Geneva Steel once about asbestos vs. fiberglass. He agreed that both were dangerous. However, asbestos was a cheap, easily mined mineral, mostly from Canada. Owens-Corning couldn't compete. They hired their own scientists to prove that asbestos was harmful and lobbied Congress to outlaw it so they could replace it with fiberglass.
It was 100% about money, nothing about public safety.
Here's the funny thing. The town in Canada with the largest asbestos mine has a constant background level of asbestos in the air that is many, many times higher than OSHA acceptable exposure levels, and they do not have any higher rate of lung cancer, asbestosis or mesothelioma than anywhere else, with the exception of those that worked directly in the mines. Just like working unprotected in a coal mine will give you black lung disease, whereas having a pile of coal in your yard and burning it in your furnace will not.
This is what this gentleman told me, and he would know.
Second biggest town is Thetford, VT. All those miners are dead now. None from cancer. Old age, riding snow machines into trees. Car accidents. Poisoned by wife. Fell into well. Terrible Garden Weasel incidents. Deer hunting mishaps. Wolverines. But not a meso-case among them.

Sirhr
 

c1steve

Sergeant
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As far in that as you are, go to the next .005 or .010 size on a crank grind and put in new bearings. No point in going that deep and not doing crank and mains/rods.

Nice job! Gonna be a powerhouse!!!

Sirhr
Older engines benefit greatly by precision machining and balancing.
First have the block decked, where the top at all four corners is within a .001" range (of each other).
Then have the connecting rod lengths set equal, and check the pistons. New pistons are usually very close to each other.
Have the crank ground to the highest tolerance available.

Next have the parts balanced. Overall efficiency is usually up a minimum of 10%, and very often over 20% if these simple steps are taken.

Once the block and associated parts are done, you can build the heads to a high standard. Do not knurl the valve guides, that is a joke. Put in replaceable cast iron valve guides, cost about $15-$20 a guide. Put in all new exhaust valves, I like Manly valves. New intake valves would be nice as well.

And last, check the combustion chamber volume for each cylinder. You need a plastic plate with two holes, plus a graduated burette with stand. Use a die grinder to smoothly grind away in any combustion chamber that is small. Try to get the chambers within .1 ml of each other.

A stock cam is probably best. Buy a high quality timing roller timing chain set.
 
Last edited:

DaveinCO

Drunk and
Belligerents
Feb 21, 2017
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Older engines benefit greatly by precision machining and balancing.
First have the block decked, where the top at all four corners is within a .001" range (of each other).
Then have the connecting rod lengths set equal, and check the pistons. New pistons are usually very close to each other.
Have the crank ground to the highest tolerance available.

Next have the parts balanced. Overall efficiency is usually up a minimum of 10%, and very often over 20% if these simple steps are taken.

Once the block and associated parts are done, you can build the heads to a high standard. Do not knurl the valve guides, that is a joke. Put in replaceable cast iron valve guides, cost about $15-$20 a guide. Put in all new exhaust valves, I like Manly valves. New intake valves would be nice as well.

And last, check the combustion chamber volume for each cylinder. You need a plastic plate with two holes, plus a graduated burette with stand. Use a die grinder to smoothly grind away in any combustion chamber that is small. Try to get the chambers within .1 ml of each other.

A stock cam is probably best. Buy a high quality timing roller timing chain set.
Oh man,
I was 100% with you for a minute.

Then you said stock cam.