Military Jeopardy

sirhrmechanic

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The Snobbiest Town in The Snobbiest State in the N
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Conaso

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Jul 8, 2011
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Ft. Belvoir Area, Northern Virginia
I can’t find it. But it relates to how bores are measured ie lands vs grooves measured. Some cartridges like the 44 mag are actually 0.429/0.430 because they evolved from a cartridge with a rebated bullet... "

"When Colt finally began to offer metallic cartridge revolvers — after the lapse of the Rollin White patent on bored through, rear loading cylinders — converting their well-loved .36 caliber revolvers to metallic cartridges was a priority. The problem was that a cartridge occupies some of the cylinder space that had been filled only by the powder and bullet in the cap-and-ball revolver. The bullet itself could not be fitted completely inside the case, because it would be severely undersized to the bore. The answer to this problem was a heeled bullet.

This .38 Short uses a heel-type bullet and external lubrication. Note that the exposed bullet is the same diameter as the case.

Heeled bullets use a major diameter that matches the outside diameter of case, with an inner portion, the heel, that is small enough to fit inside the cartridge. These bullets were about .380″ in diameter, conforming to the available space within the modified cylinder and were held in place by a heel of about .360″ that could be inserted and crimped inside the case. Once fired the bullet performed like the cap-and-ball projectile, swaging into the rifling once it left the cylinder. These cartridges, the .38 Short and .38 Long were measured by the external bullet diameter and naming them .38s made obvious sense.

As cartridges evolved, heeled bullet became less popular because they required external lubrication that attracted grime and dust. With the birth of internally lubricated cartridges, beginning with the .44 Russian, the die was cast and heeled bullets were quickly considered obsolete. Now the .22 Long Rifle and its family are the only commonly encountered cartridges of this type. The rest are the domain of cartridge collectors.

This later .38 Short Colt featured internal lubrication and a smaller diameter bullet.

In order to make the new method of lubrication work, bullets needed to have a bearing surface that would both come in contact with the bore and remain protected within the cartridge. The easiest solution was to make the whole bullet the same diameter as the bullet heel had once been. This protected the lubricant from outside contaminants, as it was seated deeply inside the cartridge. Now, however, the bores of all of these converted revolvers were much too large to swage the new .357″-.364″diameter bullets. In order to fit these new bullets, the barrel dimensions had to be reduced. They took on the now common .355-357″ groove depth and .346-351 bore diameter that are the recognized barrel dimensions for the .38 Special and .357 Magnum cartridges along with a sea of later mid-bore arrivals like the 9mm Parabellum and .380 ACP. By that time, precedent had been set and many cartridges had adopted .38 as part of their name."
 

Conaso

Private
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Ft. Belvoir Area, Northern Virginia
As shown above .38 caliber or .357" mag has nothing directly to do with bore vs grove diameter. The issue also applies to some other calibers, i.e., .41, .44, etc. The .36 probably went away because it was so close to .32 and/or .38 it offered nothing special.

There's always an exception. Why does 5.56mm not convert .224"?

5.56 ÷ 25.4 = 0.2188976378"
.224" x 25.4 = 5.6896mm

Typically because Europeans measure bore diameter and Americans measure groove/bullet diameter.

Of course there are exceptions, .223 Remington, .22 Hornets being .223" and .224" ...🙄
 

Son of Dorn

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Jul 27, 2019
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Ever wondered why a Lt. General outranks a Major General?
According to Wikipedia:

The seeming incongruity that a lieutenant general outranks a major general (whereas a major outranks a lieutenant) is due to the derivation of the former rank from sergeant major general, which was also subordinate to lieutenant general. In some countries (e.g. France and Italy), the ranks of corps general or lieutenant colonel general are used instead of lieutenant general, in an attempt to solve this apparent anomaly – these ranks are often translated into English as lieutenant general.
 

Conaso

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Ft. Belvoir Area, Northern Virginia
Correct! (Google?)

And if gold is more precious than silver, respectively, why does a 1st Lt.'s silver bar or Lt. Colonel's silver leaf outrank the gold bar of a 2nd Lt. or gold leaf of a major?

And it's not bronze - AR 671-1, Ch 28.

It has something to do with epaulets...
 

Son of Dorn

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Jul 27, 2019
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10 gauge, paper, primed, 6" long. Used during WW2 through Viet Nam. What is it used for?
That is a WWII-era AN MK-4 Bomb Signal/spotting charge.

The AN MK-4 spotting charge consisted of an extra long 10-gauge blank shotgun shell that was inserted into the hollow chamber of the bomb. The primer end of the shotgun shell was downward so the blast would go upwards through the tail section upon impact. In the nose of the MK-23 were two small holes where a cotter pin was inserted. This pin went into a firing pin which then fired the primer on the shotgun shell. There were two slightly different firing pin assemblies that were interchangeable and functioned basically the same. The shotgun shell fit loosely in the chamber when inserted into the nose, but it could not fall out the bottom. There was a space between the primer end of the shotgun shell and the firing pin. Upon impact, the inertia caused the shotgun shell to come forward into the stationary firing pin. The other firing pin design had the inertia of the hit drive the firing pin backwards into the shotgun shell.
 

S Roche

Private
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Feb 18, 2017
86
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Nebraska
Son of Dorn is a winner. The following link is to the description as posted by S of D. If you want to learn more about WW2 aviation training and the fatalities that occurred in Nebraska which was one of the largest training areas for the AAF pilots you will find it a good read. Also sad at how many men lost there lives. In my area there are 6 of which I have visited 2. Amazing how many 50 cal. bullets and scraps of what was once a B-17 or B-26 is left.

http://www.nebraskaaircrash.com/main.html
 

NukeMMC

Damn Bubblehead
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Barney, you saw a model of it there.

Well, this one is a stumper and since there is nothing, nada about it on the Interwebs, we’ll have to pass, Alex!

So here is one: What very nasty thing did Hyman Rickover’ s fellow Midshipmen do to him and one other student at Annapolis?

Sirhr
Did he run the gauntlet under the dining tables?
My dad (USNA 1950) told me about having to do that as a plebe, except he took butter with him and took care of upper classmens' shoes.
 
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S Roche

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Nebraska
And the ones they use now (Navy) are full aluminum bodies and about 5ish inches long.
Yes, you are correct, same length. I have one of those also.
Not to derail the thread but in the link in my previous post, P-47's were a killer. Kind of like taking a 19 year old from a Yugo and putting him in a Corvette. Father went into advanced training in a P-38. I have read in his journal that aerial to ground gunnery was very dangerous. Fly to the range at 10,000', at 1 mile out turn 90 degrees increase speed to about 350 mph, descend to 100' and fire 100 rds. It took a toll on new pilots.
 

NukeMMC

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Nope, this was something they did to his Senior Year Yearbook...

Sirhr
I would say something about shooting holes in the theory, but that may give it away. Perforations indeed!
Full transparency - I looked it up and it is quite the nasty "prank" to have gotten then-acting SECNAV Roosevelt (Teddy Jr) involved!
 
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NukeMMC

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Nope.

And I am withdrawing that question... it's still classified.

So go check out the Hyman Rickover question and forget I asked.

Cheers,

Sirhr
Aw crap, do I have to sign another "I'll forget everything I never knew" document?

Have you ever seen Rickover's Entrance exam for potential Navy Nuclear officer's. It used to be CONFIDENTIAL-NOFORN as part of NRTBs (Naval Reactor Technical Bulletins).
 
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Son of Dorn

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Nope.

And I am withdrawing that question... it's still classified.

So go check out the Hyman Rickover question and forget I asked.

Cheers,

Sirhr
Ah well I found a partial answer for Rickover (or, rather, for his classmate), but no specifics as yet...

(But I've figured out what they used the tower for. That's where they REALLY fired the shot that killed Kennedy, isn't it? With a super-secret early-'60s ultra death ray!)
 

sirhrmechanic

Command Sgt. Major
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The Snobbiest Town in The Snobbiest State in the N
Aw crap, do I have to sign another "I'll forget everything I never knew" document?

Have you ever seen Rickover's Entrance exam for potential Navy Nuclear officer's. It used to be CONFIDENTIAL-NOFORN as part of NRTBs (Naval Reactor Technical Bulletins).
No... I worked with a guy who was one of the last officers who he personally interviewed. He was officer on a special ops boat... and his stories of his interview are hilarious. Also his classmates.

But the event I am referring to is that his classmates had his page put in the yearbook with perforations. There were two Jewish graduates from the USNA in Rickover's class. Both had their pages perforated so their classmates could tear them out easily.

Rickover is one of my heroes. The underdog... the nerd. Abused 8 ways from Sunday. Who becomes the toughest kid in the class and changes the world. I like people like that.

Cheers,

Sirhr
 

Son of Dorn

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sirhrmechanic

Command Sgt. Major
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The Snobbiest Town in The Snobbiest State in the N
Ah well I found a partial answer for Rickover (or, rather, for his classmate), but no specifics as yet...

(But I've figured out what they used the tower for. That's where they REALLY fired the shot that killed Kennedy, isn't it? With a super-secret early-'60s ultra death ray!)
No.

Not even close.

But very psychotic answer! Congrats.

Cheers,

Sirhr
 
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NukeMMC

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No... I worked with a guy who was one of the last officers who he personally interviewed. He was officer on a special ops boat... and his stories of his interview are hilarious. Also his classmates.

But the event I am referring to is that his classmates had his page put in the yearbook with perforations. There were two Jewish graduates from the USNA in Rickover's class. Both had their pages perforated so their classmates could tear them out easily.

Rickover is one of my heroes. The underdog... the nerd. Abused 8 ways from Sunday. Who becomes the toughest kid in the class and changes the world. I like people like that.

Cheers,

Sirhr
Naval Reactors Aptitude Test

Instructions: Read each question carefully. Answer all questions. Time limit 4 hours. Begin immediately. Work in numerical order. Equipment remaining from question #1 may prove useful in questions #3 and #6.


1. Medicine. You have been provided with a razor blade, a piece of gauze, and a bottle of scotch. Remove your appendix. Do not suture until your work has been inspected. You have 15 minutes.

2. History. Describe the history of the papacy from its origins to the present day. Concentrate especially but not exclusively on its social, political, economic, religious, and philosophical impact on Europe, Asia, America, and Africa. Be brief, concise, and specific.

3. Public Speaking. Two thousand drug-crazed aborigines are storming the classroom. Calm them. You may use any ancient language except Latin and Greek.

4. Biology. Create life. Estimate the difference in subsequent human culture if this form of life had been created 500 million years earlier. Pay special attention to its probable effect on the English Parliamentary System.

5. Music. Write a piano concerto. Orchestrate and perform it with flute and drum. You will find a piano under your seat.

6. Engineering. The disassembled parts of a high power rifle have been placed in a box on your desk. You will also find an instruction manual printed in Swahili. In 10 minutes a hungry Bengal tiger will be admitted to the room. Take whatever action you feel is appropriate. Be prepared to justify your decision.

7. Sociology. What sociological problems might accompany the end of the world? Construct and experiment to test your theory.

8. Management Science. Define management. Define science. How do they relate? Create a generalized algorithm to optimize all managerial decisions. Assuming a Cray X-MP supercomputer supporting 50 terminals, each terminal to activate your algorithm, design the communications interface and all necessary control problems.

9. Psychology. Based on your knowledge of their works, evaluate the emotional stability, degree of adjustment, and repressed frustration of each: Alexander of Aphrodisias, Ramses II, Gregory of Nicea, and Hammurabi. Support your evaluation with quotations from each man’s work. It is not necessary to translate.

10. Economics. Develop a realistic plan for refinancing the national debt. Trace the possible effects of your plan on these areas: Cubism, The Donatist Controversy, and the wave theory of light.

11. Epistemology. Take a position for or against truth. Prove the validity of your position.

12. Classical Physics. Explain the nature of matter. Include in your answer an evaluation of the impact of the development of mathematics on science.

13. Modern Physics. Produce element 119. Determine its half-life.

14. Energy Resources. Construct a working fusion reactor.

15. Philosophy. Sketch the development of human thought. Estimate its significance. Compare this with the development of any other kind of thought.

16. General Knowledge. Describe in detail, briefly.

17. Extra Credit. Define the universe. Give three examples.
 

sirhrmechanic

Command Sgt. Major
Belligerents
Feb 23, 2010
16,571
49,632
219
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The Snobbiest Town in The Snobbiest State in the N
Naval Reactors Aptitude Test

Instructions: Read each question carefully. Answer all questions. Time limit 4 hours. Begin immediately. Work in numerical order. Equipment remaining from question #1 may prove useful in questions #3 and #6.


1. Medicine. You have been provided with a razor blade, a piece of gauze, and a bottle of scotch. Remove your appendix. Do not suture until your work has been inspected. You have 15 minutes.

2. History. Describe the history of the papacy from its origins to the present day. Concentrate especially but not exclusively on its social, political, economic, religious, and philosophical impact on Europe, Asia, America, and Africa. Be brief, concise, and specific.

3. Public Speaking. Two thousand drug-crazed aborigines are storming the classroom. Calm them. You may use any ancient language except Latin and Greek.

4. Biology. Create life. Estimate the difference in subsequent human culture if this form of life had been created 500 million years earlier. Pay special attention to its probable effect on the English Parliamentary System.

5. Music. Write a piano concerto. Orchestrate and perform it with flute and drum. You will find a piano under your seat.

6. Engineering. The disassembled parts of a high power rifle have been placed in a box on your desk. You will also find an instruction manual printed in Swahili. In 10 minutes a hungry Bengal tiger will be admitted to the room. Take whatever action you feel is appropriate. Be prepared to justify your decision.

7. Sociology. What sociological problems might accompany the end of the world? Construct and experiment to test your theory.

8. Management Science. Define management. Define science. How do they relate? Create a generalized algorithm to optimize all managerial decisions. Assuming a Cray X-MP supercomputer supporting 50 terminals, each terminal to activate your algorithm, design the communications interface and all necessary control problems.

9. Psychology. Based on your knowledge of their works, evaluate the emotional stability, degree of adjustment, and repressed frustration of each: Alexander of Aphrodisias, Ramses II, Gregory of Nicea, and Hammurabi. Support your evaluation with quotations from each man’s work. It is not necessary to translate.

10. Economics. Develop a realistic plan for refinancing the national debt. Trace the possible effects of your plan on these areas: Cubism, The Donatist Controversy, and the wave theory of light.

11. Epistemology. Take a position for or against truth. Prove the validity of your position.

12. Classical Physics. Explain the nature of matter. Include in your answer an evaluation of the impact of the development of mathematics on science.

13. Modern Physics. Produce element 119. Determine its half-life.

14. Energy Resources. Construct a working fusion reactor.

15. Philosophy. Sketch the development of human thought. Estimate its significance. Compare this with the development of any other kind of thought.

16. General Knowledge. Describe in detail, briefly.

17. Extra Credit. Define the universe. Give three examples.

I love this test!

Sirhr
 
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NukeMMC

Damn Bubblehead
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Mar 3, 2009
1,209
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Naval Reactors Aptitude Test

Instructions: Read each question carefully. Answer all questions. Time limit 4 hours. Begin immediately. Work in numerical order. Equipment remaining from question #1 may prove useful in questions #3 and #6.


1. Medicine. You have been provided with a razor blade, a piece of gauze, and a bottle of scotch. Remove your appendix. Do not suture until your work has been inspected. You have 15 minutes.

2. History. Describe the history of the papacy from its origins to the present day. Concentrate especially but not exclusively on its social, political, economic, religious, and philosophical impact on Europe, Asia, America, and Africa. Be brief, concise, and specific.

3. Public Speaking. Two thousand drug-crazed aborigines are storming the classroom. Calm them. You may use any ancient language except Latin and Greek.

4. Biology. Create life. Estimate the difference in subsequent human culture if this form of life had been created 500 million years earlier. Pay special attention to its probable effect on the English Parliamentary System.

5. Music. Write a piano concerto. Orchestrate and perform it with flute and drum. You will find a piano under your seat.

6. Engineering. The disassembled parts of a high power rifle have been placed in a box on your desk. You will also find an instruction manual printed in Swahili. In 10 minutes a hungry Bengal tiger will be admitted to the room. Take whatever action you feel is appropriate. Be prepared to justify your decision.

7. Sociology. What sociological problems might accompany the end of the world? Construct and experiment to test your theory.

8. Management Science. Define management. Define science. How do they relate? Create a generalized algorithm to optimize all managerial decisions. Assuming a Cray X-MP supercomputer supporting 50 terminals, each terminal to activate your algorithm, design the communications interface and all necessary control problems.

9. Psychology. Based on your knowledge of their works, evaluate the emotional stability, degree of adjustment, and repressed frustration of each: Alexander of Aphrodisias, Ramses II, Gregory of Nicea, and Hammurabi. Support your evaluation with quotations from each man’s work. It is not necessary to translate.

10. Economics. Develop a realistic plan for refinancing the national debt. Trace the possible effects of your plan on these areas: Cubism, The Donatist Controversy, and the wave theory of light.

11. Epistemology. Take a position for or against truth. Prove the validity of your position.

12. Classical Physics. Explain the nature of matter. Include in your answer an evaluation of the impact of the development of mathematics on science.

13. Modern Physics. Produce element 119. Determine its half-life.

14. Energy Resources. Construct a working fusion reactor.

15. Philosophy. Sketch the development of human thought. Estimate its significance. Compare this with the development of any other kind of thought.

16. General Knowledge. Describe in detail, briefly.

17. Extra Credit. Define the universe. Give three examples.
For anyone who went to the Navy Nuclear Power School, this test, especially the last 2 questions, is pretty frickin hilarious. Everything about the program was so stick-up-the-butt, but then this was in one of the documents Hyman himself had to at least approve. When you took the Comprehensive Exam at the end of Nuke school, it was a 4 or 6 hour ordeal, all on pink paper and every question was essay . The common theme was "Show your work" and NXNC or "No Xenon, No Credit"

Now you might have some insight as to why Nuke submariners have such a fucked up sense of humor.