Military Jeopardy

MK20

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Webley came around in 1880s. Is it before that? Because if you mean the webley I think the Merwin predates that a bit.
 

MK20

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So I am now confused.

It is not the twist/ pull Merwin Hulbert because now you say it is Brit.

It is not a Webley because even though that might be described as a twist pull it isn’t really. And you said it isn’t.

It is solid frame, which pretty well precludes a twist pull type design unless it is a copy of the M&H.

The only other weird design I have seen before is the Galan/ Somerville design which was also used by the Russians in another form. But this is open top so it doesn’t fit either.

It can’t be one of the weird Belgian guns because it is British.

The only other one that I can think of that might fit is the Bland Pryse stopping revolver I saw a while ago, but it is break action, not really twist and pull.
 

MK20

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Enfield MK I is later and is a top break, but I am starting to think that might be what he means because for the life of me I can’t think of a BRIT twist pull type of revolver.
 

Blue Sky Country

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Regarding the earlier question, wasn't the Rogers and Spencer a .44? I thought we were looking for a .45??

The bore and chamber diameters of most of the 19th century caplock revolvers, including the R&S, are between .452 and .457. Thus, they were technically .45's. The R&S sports a .454 bore diameter.
 

MK20

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You are misunderstanding how bore measurement changed from muzzleloading to cartridge arms.
There is a good video on this and I will see if I can’t find it for you.
 
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MK20

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I can’t find it. But it relates to how bores are measured ie lands vs grooves measured. Some cartridges like the 44 mag are actually 0.429/0.430 because they evolved from a cartridge with a rebated bullet, etc. and then started using a typical bullet once they were “special” and “magnum” ized.

In the conversion to cartridges a lot of nomenclature and bore measurement changed in a confusing way.
 
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Blue Sky Country

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The cylinder conversion is just so the revolver can now chamber and fire the .45 Long Colt/Schofield cartridge. The conversion cylinders for the R&S reproduction, as well as the original Richard-Mason conversions built for 19th century caplocks, were "drop in fit" affairs. Their use did not require the gun to have it's barrel relined. .44 Colts and Remingtons were readily converted to .45 LC because their bore diameters are .45XX, placing them exactly in .45 LC specs. The .36 caliber cap and ball sixguns actually had bore diameters of roughly .375-.376, and the later .38 Long Colt and .38 Special all use bullets with these same diameters, thus many .36 caplocks were readily converted via the Richard-Mason system without relining the bores.
 

Son of Dorn

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So I am now confused.

It is not the twist/ pull Merwin Hulbert because now you say it is Brit.

It is not a Webley because even though that might be described as a twist pull it isn’t really. And you said it isn’t.

It is solid frame, which pretty well precludes a twist pull type design unless it is a copy of the M&H.

The only other weird design I have seen before is the Galan/ Somerville design which was also used by the Russians in another form. But this is open top so it doesn’t fit either.

It can’t be one of the weird Belgian guns because it is British.

The only other one that I can think of that might fit is the Bland Pryse stopping revolver I saw a while ago, but it is break action, not really twist and pull.
I believe it predates the M&H but works on nearly the exact same principle. But the Galand & Somerville is just about the same time period, so I congratulate you on that thought. It is not an Enfield.

A final clue: It was made by a gunmaker in Birmingham. That is, of course, in England, not Alabama.

(Google is OK for this one, btw. It may be less sporting but think of it more like a scavenger hunt than a Jeopardy question.)
 
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Blue Sky Country

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What is a Mauser C-96?

ETA: William E. Fairbairn was one hardcore and remarkable character. And to have lived to old age when most other men in his profession died way earlier is saying something about his dedication to the mastery and study of both armed and unarmed combat arts. He developed pretty effective body armor for both the Municipal and Concession police forces when the 7.63x25 Mauser cartridge became highly popular on the streets of Shanghai. That is one round that would punch modern (soft) armor with no issues at all.

...And creating a wholly new survival based fighting system by blending Chinese and Japanese martial arts with western alley/street fighting. He was the original Marc MacYoung and Rex Applegate. Awesome stuff.
 
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sandwarrior

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Why is Den Helder unique in military history?
(for those new to this googling not allowed. Also trying to resurrect this thread)
Googling is research. Research has to be allowed or we'll get even more stuff pulled out of peoples asses. :rolleyes:

The only thing I see is that corrected (85) ships were captured in the Anglo-Russian invasion of the Netherlands (Dutch). The ships were frozen in harbor and they were captured by cavalry troops. The other thing is the water between Den Helder and the next piece of land is fast and treacherous. A lot of ships have wrecked there.
 
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Son of Dorn

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"Cheese" and "ship part" makes me think of Monitor-type ironclads but I don't think that's right.
 

LeftyJason

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Googling is research. Research has to be allowed or we'll get even more stuff pulled out of peoples asses. :rolleyes:

The only thing I see is that corrected (85) ships were captured in the Anglo-Russian invasion of the Netherlands (Dutch). The ships were frozen in harbor and they were captured by cavalry troops. The other thing is the water between Den Helder and the next piece of land is fast and treacherous. A lot of ships have wrecked there.
Correct. French cavalry captured Dutch ships.
 
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Son of Dorn

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Chernobyl... ship parts... cheese...

Shot in the dark but... "Green Cheese"/"Cockburn Cheese" anti-ship radar-guided nuclear missile?