Match report from Norway, new film: stage 18, Really far

THLR

Private
Belligerents
Nov 19, 2012
45
23
12
42
Will post some films from this match here so you can get a superficial glance at the misery that is Midnight Sun Rifle Challenge.
The focus of these films are mostly to show beginners/interested parties what/how we shoot and hopefully give a few pointers to lower threshold for future participation/beginner's success. It is mostly Norwegian and Swedish shooters participating, but we also had shooters from Belgium and Poland this year.

This year's trophies was supplied by Kahles and Atec. As always it is awarded by random draw, meaning every shooter willing to improve has an equal chance of winning.


Stage 10: Pop-up targets
Stage 1: LRProficiency test
Stage 2: Dancing target
Stage 3: Biathlon runner
Stage 4: RPS rock
 

Sheldon N

Blind Squirrel Finds a Nut
Belligerents
Sep 24, 2014
3,053
1,408
219
Pacific Northwest
The focus of these films are mostly to show beginners/interested parties what/how we shoot and hopefully give a few pointers to lower threshold for future participation/beginner's success.
Enjoy watching your videos, beautiful scenery, no unnecessary narration, fun to watch shooters from around the world. Thank you for sharing them.

If you don't mind, I'll offer a couple simple tips for shooting moving targets in a match that can dramatically improve your hit percentage.

1) Calculate the mover speed in Mils/Sec by measuring fixed objects with reticle then timing how long the target takes to cross them. I see you already informally did this and referenced the mover speed at ~ 1 Mil per second.

2) Once target range is known, multiply the bullet time of flight to target by the calculated mils/sec speed. This gives your exact lead to center of target. For example if target moves at 1.3 mils/sec and time of flight is 0.689 seconds then your exact lead to center is 0.9 mils in the reticle.

3) If there is wind, make your best estimation and dial the wind on the turret. This will allow you to maintain the same target lead in both directions.

4) Ambush the target, don't attempt to track it. Get the crosshairs ahead of the target, settle into a stable position and watch the target come into center. When the target crosses your designated lead, break the shot attempting to time it so that firing takes place when lead is on center of target. This requires starting to break the trigger just a little bit early, more around leading edge rather than center.

The biggest advantage to ambushing is that it allows for much better fundamentals when making the shot since you can be holding still while pulling the trigger. If you shoot, reposition, shoot, reposition you can go very quickly. The mover in your video could be easily hit 4 to 5 times per pass in each direction with this technique.
 

THLR

Private
Belligerents
Nov 19, 2012
45
23
12
42
I absolutely agree with you Sheldon. My biggest frustration with this stage is the 2 shot limit per pass, even with fumbling 3 shots are easy.

The ONLY reason I prefer leading over ambush is that I shoot a bit of moving game and the windows available are usually in the 4-10 seconds range. At these matches, I am just a participant for the training value and I do not shoot for score - I am one of few persons in Scandinavia shooting these matches with a hunting rifle, the bias is clearly towards match rifles (as it should be). Your suggested method clearly gives a more solid starting point.
 
Reactions: Sheldon N

TJC

Full Member
Belligerents
May 24, 2010
827
32
34
Interesting that quite a few of your matches ban the use of LRF’s, ballistic calculators, wind meters, barometric pressure gauges/indicators, thermometers etc.

What’s the thinking behind that ? It’s different to what we are seeing elsewhere.
 

THLR

Private
Belligerents
Nov 19, 2012
45
23
12
42
Basically to bring a stronger focus to the basic skillset of longrange shooting. I am not familiar with any matches that allow electronic tools here. A couple of the matches also have an element of endurance (staying awake for 24 hrs or walking 20 miles, enduring cold or something similar).
 

THLR

Private
Belligerents
Nov 19, 2012
45
23
12
42
Thanks, Thomas. I really appreciate all your contributions!
Thanks, very kind words.

Great videos, beautiful countryside.
It can be nice, but quite often the weather negates any view.

. Good on y’all for adding some serious physical stressors
There are two significant matches in Norway. The southern one is "NM Langhold" done in winter and involves maybe 10-15 miles of snowshoeing through the hills in (sometimes severe) cold and deep snow, the second one is MSRC this one which involves a descend/ ascend and sleep deprivation. Both focus on basics.

I was up Thursday morning and besides a few powernaps didn't hit sleep until Sunday night 04:30. It is fair to say that caused a few "silly mistakes" and a few hours where it felt like my brain was dipped in teflon oil.
 

Reload10

Private
Minuteman
Jan 21, 2018
15
11
6
A 20 mile ruck would end the prs series day one. Good on y’all for adding some serious physical stressors
That's one thing I wish USA matches had more of. I like some physical stress in a match. IDK why there isn't more single load stages were your rounds are 10-20 yards away and you have to run to retrieve each one.
 
Reactions: PBWalsh

THLR

Private
Belligerents
Nov 19, 2012
45
23
12
42
That's one thing I wish USA matches had more of. I like some physical stress in a match. IDK why there isn't more single load stages were your rounds are 10-20 yards away and you have to run to retrieve each one.
The physical hardship isn't all that much if you're used to walking, it only takes about 20 hrs to finish the match. What is "fun" to watch is when the shooters get tired and fumble with basic mental skills. For example holding perfect for windage, but suddenly mistaking left for right. Many shooters seems to have a dip that lasts 1 to 3 stages were performance drops.
 

RedRyder

Full Member
Belligerents
Feb 22, 2013
357
99
34
Pittsburgh, PA
THLR - thanks very much for your contributions to SH. I have a question, what sort of cold weather gear do you folks employ up there?
 

THLR

Private
Belligerents
Nov 19, 2012
45
23
12
42
I have a question, what sort of cold weather gear do you folks employ up there?
Funny you should ask, I gathered film for that topic yesterday. Living at 67 North I do get some exposure due weather statistics alone, simply not possible to avoid as we have a lot of wind on top of the rain and cold (for reference, Yukon is 64N, Idaho is 44N) .

The wind and windchill is usually what gets you, I've had a full week of 30-40 kts now, bringing effective temperature down to -34 C/ -30 F which again means that I'm using a weeks worth of firewood in a single day, the wind just bleeds my old house cold. I can't wear metal glasses and you really need to use a good windbreaker allthough temperature is only -8 C / 17 F. Other than that, I don't bother with anything special as I'm only out for max 1 hour going to-from work etc.

For going out I dress like this:
From Inner to outer top:

Aklima woolnet crew neck. (It has the right quality, so I'm brand specific here)
Wool sweather with zip neck and possibly thumbholes (many options, no brand mentioned)
Optional midlayer insulation, synthethic like primaloft gold (it's COLD before I put on that)
Thinnest windbreaker (in case of excellent weather and you want to walk without a jacket)
Shell jacket with hood
Optional snowbreaker jacket (to keep the snow from entering)
Thin windcap
Optional thin shooting gloves
Wool mitten (Devold Nansen)
Shell overmitten
(No, gloves will simply not do...)

Felt insoles in boots
Wool socks
Optional wool or woolnet longjohns
Optional running tights for winter use if it isn't really that cold
Shell pants with ventilation side zippers
Optional snowbreaker pants to keep snow off your clothes.

For regulating heatloss:
Wrist pulseheater, wool (for really cold weather or when I'm shooting and mittens are on/off & expose the hands)
Wool balaclava
Wool headover
Thick wool beanie

I guess most of these products are not very well known in the US, seeing how your major hunting brands massively market their "solutions", but they seems to be unaware that there are different principles to dressing the heat in and dressing the cold out. To me, endure and thrive are two different words. Here's a link http://www.aclima.com/collection?Filter=49¤2:49¤2_Accessories&Keep=true

Safetygear:
Foam sitting pad
High end insulation jacket (synt or down)
Windbreaker bivvy bag

You don't really dress/undress, you just open up/shut down the heatloss depending on your activity.
Use limited amounts of soap in the morning and use waterfree moisturizer for hands and face to keep skin from cracking in the cold.
Try to drink heated or temperate fluids only ( keep your bottle inside the jacket, heat with body).
Don't EVER lose your mittens.
 
Last edited:

THLR

Private
Belligerents
Nov 19, 2012
45
23
12
42
Another stage, shooting multiple targets inside a time limit. It's one of those stages that are traditionally perceived as very easy, but stage statistics indicate otherwise.

 
Last edited:
Reactions: JMGlasgow

THLR

Private
Belligerents
Nov 19, 2012
45
23
12
42
Stage 17 Know Your Limits, a very popular stage which can cause quite a stir in the ranking lists as top shooters can suddenly drop 6-15 points and the careful ones can close the gap with 6-10 points.

 
Reactions: JMGlasgow and KZP

THLR

Private
Belligerents
Nov 19, 2012
45
23
12
42
have you a link to some of those type of comps
All of these films are from MSRC which has the 24 hrs (minimum) Activity. "NM Langhold" is the second one, but little media from there. That is in March, walking on snow (snowshoes) for approximately 10 miles). These are the only two matches with such content that I am aware of.

More and more foreigners travel in for these two matches.
 
Reactions: hiddenmongoose