Match report from Norway: Midnight Sun Rifle Challenge 2018

THLR

Private
Nov 19, 2012
36
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#1
Will post some films from this match here so you can get a superficial glance at the misery that is Midnight Sun Rifle Challenge.
The focus of these films are mostly to show beginners/interested parties what/how we shoot and hopefully give a few pointers to lower threshold for future participation/beginner's success. It is mostly Norwegian and Swedish shooters participating, but we also had shooters from Belgium and Poland this year.

This year's trophies was supplied by Kahles and Atec. As always it is awarded by random draw, meaning every shooter willing to improve has an equal chance of winning.


Stage 10: Pop-up targets
Stage 1: LRProficiency test
Stage 2: Dancing target
Stage 3: Biathlon runner
Stage 4: RPS rock
 
Likes: Komoden

Sheldon N

Blind Squirrel Finds a Nut
Sep 24, 2014
2,829
733
113
Pacific Northwest
#6
The focus of these films are mostly to show beginners/interested parties what/how we shoot and hopefully give a few pointers to lower threshold for future participation/beginner's success.
Enjoy watching your videos, beautiful scenery, no unnecessary narration, fun to watch shooters from around the world. Thank you for sharing them.

If you don't mind, I'll offer a couple simple tips for shooting moving targets in a match that can dramatically improve your hit percentage.

1) Calculate the mover speed in Mils/Sec by measuring fixed objects with reticle then timing how long the target takes to cross them. I see you already informally did this and referenced the mover speed at ~ 1 Mil per second.

2) Once target range is known, multiply the bullet time of flight to target by the calculated mils/sec speed. This gives your exact lead to center of target. For example if target moves at 1.3 mils/sec and time of flight is 0.689 seconds then your exact lead to center is 0.9 mils in the reticle.

3) If there is wind, make your best estimation and dial the wind on the turret. This will allow you to maintain the same target lead in both directions.

4) Ambush the target, don't attempt to track it. Get the crosshairs ahead of the target, settle into a stable position and watch the target come into center. When the target crosses your designated lead, break the shot attempting to time it so that firing takes place when lead is on center of target. This requires starting to break the trigger just a little bit early, more around leading edge rather than center.

The biggest advantage to ambushing is that it allows for much better fundamentals when making the shot since you can be holding still while pulling the trigger. If you shoot, reposition, shoot, reposition you can go very quickly. The mover in your video could be easily hit 4 to 5 times per pass in each direction with this technique.
 

THLR

Private
Nov 19, 2012
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#7
I absolutely agree with you Sheldon. My biggest frustration with this stage is the 2 shot limit per pass, even with fumbling 3 shots are easy.

The ONLY reason I prefer leading over ambush is that I shoot a bit of moving game and the windows available are usually in the 4-10 seconds range. At these matches, I am just a participant for the training value and I do not shoot for score - I am one of few persons in Scandinavia shooting these matches with a hunting rifle, the bias is clearly towards match rifles (as it should be). Your suggested method clearly gives a more solid starting point.
 
Likes: Sheldon N

TJC

Full Member
May 24, 2010
815
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#8
Interesting that quite a few of your matches ban the use of LRF’s, ballistic calculators, wind meters, barometric pressure gauges/indicators, thermometers etc.

What’s the thinking behind that ? It’s different to what we are seeing elsewhere.
 

THLR

Private
Nov 19, 2012
36
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#9
Basically to bring a stronger focus to the basic skillset of longrange shooting. I am not familiar with any matches that allow electronic tools here. A couple of the matches also have an element of endurance (staying awake for 24 hrs or walking 20 miles, enduring cold or something similar).