Making a No4 Mk1 faux T

Dski48

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I recently refinished a bubba'ed no4 mk1 I picked up from a guy off Armslist, the barrel looks great and has a number 1 bolt head and from my initial range testing it appears to have good accuracy potential. I'm wanting to scope this rifle, I want to go with a no 32 scope and was looking at the repro made by numrich. My question is has anyone used this optic or is there any other options that are good for a comparable price tag?
 

Danger Mouse

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I recently refinished a bubba'ed no4 mk1 I picked up from a guy off Armslist, the barrel looks great and has a number 1 bolt head and from my initial range testing it appears to have good accuracy potential. I'm wanting to scope this rifle, I want to go with a no 32 scope and was looking at the repro made by numrich. My question is has anyone used this optic or is there any other options that are good for a comparable price tag?
Milsurps forum might be able to help. I'm curious as well because I'm doing the same thing as you.
 

Dski48

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The 32 repro is nice. Here's mine, complete with transport case that i built. Mounting the scope is a bit of a chore.
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That's a pretty rifle, is that the numrich repro? I've heard it can be a pain to zero those scopes how difficult was it to zero? And I'll likely get a mount that mounts using the extractor screw and the rear sight holes.
 

buffalowinter

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All the repro scopes are the same, I believe this came from SARCO, but it might be from Numrich. They aren't hard to zero...they're just different. They adjust just like the Unertl Marine Corps sniper MST-100. You fire a shot, and then loosen the turrets, adjust the crosshairs to cover the shot using a tool, then tighten the turrets at the new zero. The tightened turrets then have a limited windage and elevation range. The trick is to correctly mount the scope so that the barrel collimates with the scope so that you have enough adjustment range. Here is an article on how to do it. http://www.rsmscope.com/report_pdf/m2.pdf Confusing unless you have the scope to look at. You don't need a tool, you can make do without one. I bought one afterwards just to complete my scope box. Buy the entire "mk 32 scope complete" and get the tool, carrying case, mount etc. It's worth it in the long run.
 

sandwarrior

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Boy, sometimes the good posts get ahead of you and you don't see them. Very nice rifle Buffalo!

FWIW, I had a Savage No. 4 Mk 1*. When I got it down in the bags and got serious, it could shoot pretty good. Like 30 consistent hits on a 6" plate @300. The rifles will shoot! These were poo-poo'ed by the Americans, but with great ammunition, they did exceptionally well in combat.

Added: Question. When you say #1 bolt head, is that as in No. 1 Mk. 3 bolt head? Or, are you referring to the system of sizes of bolt heads that could be installed to achieve the best head space? If so, could you bring us (me) up to speed on how that works again?
 

Dski48

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Boy, sometimes the good posts get ahead of you and you don't see them. Very nice rifle Buffalo!

FWIW, I had a Savage No. 4 Mk 1*. When I got it down in the bags and got serious, it could shoot pretty good. Like 30 consistent hits on a 6" plate @300. The rifles will shoot! These were poo-poo'ed by the Americans, but with great ammunition, they did exceptionally well in combat.

Added: Question. When you say #1 bolt head, is that as in No. 1 Mk. 3 bolt head? Or, are you referring to the system of sizes of bolt heads that could be installed to achieve the best head space? If so, could you bring us (me) up to speed on how that works again?
I was referring to the size of the bolt head. From my understanding the bolt head will be thicker (by just a few thou overall) to help account for throat erosion so the rim of the case will sit against the bolt head and head space properly
 

Random Guy

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Here's what I just googled:

"Peter Laidler has today looked up the 'specification' given to the manufacturers and has informed me as follows :

No 0 = 0.629" +0 / -0.002"
No 1 = 0.632" +0 / -0.002"
No 2 = 0.635" +0 / -0.002"
No 3 = 0.638" +0 / -0.002"

...that may or may not be correct re Enfield bolt sizes, but it seems somewhat logical.
 
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sandwarrior

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I was referring to the size of the bolt head. From my understanding the bolt head will be thicker (by just a few thou overall) to help account for throat erosion so the rim of the case will sit against the bolt head and head space properly
Okay, I thought .303 Brits headspaced off the rim. Then I did some research and found I was all wrong...two left feet.

Anyhow, here's a site I found that explains it:

Throat erosion shouldn't have anything to do with it. Just how far in they punched the chamber. Unlike other rimmed cases, the .303 British headspaces on the shoulder.
 

Sooter76

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That's a beautiful setup you have there... My Faux-(T) I had built up from a salvaged receiver and a spare NOS stock I had sitting in the closet. Spent the money and got the right parts from Roger Payne and Fultons of Bisley in England. The pad and culminating work and rebarreling (with a Criterion) was done by Bruce Dow and it was restocked by Bruce Dick. It came out really nice and shoots about 2 MOA with Hornady Vintage. Once Spring hits I'm gonna start playing with loads to see what I can really get out of her.

Quick couple questions about the Numrich scope you have... I currently have a vintage K3 but would like to get a repro so it looks correct. Does it hold zero under normal range conditions? Also, I've heard the MkII repro scopes are 2 MOA per click as opposed to the correct 1 MOA per click, can you verify?
 

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340mech

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Okay, I thought .303 Brits headspaced off the rim. Then I did some research and found I was all wrong...two left feet.

Anyhow, here's a site I found that explains it:

Throat erosion shouldn't have anything to do with it. Just how far in they punched the chamber. Unlike other rimmed cases, the .303 British headspaces on the shoulder.
You were correct to begin with. It headspaces on the rim. He gives the go/no go values in the article.
 
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sandwarrior

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You were correct to begin with. It headspaces on the rim. He gives the go/no go values in the article.
I had to say that owning one and reloading for it, sure made me think it was headspaced more like a rimless, which is off the shoulder. So, then I reloaded for other rimmed cases and belted cases and understood that the case should have been headspaced off the rim. But, it sure didn't seem that the rifle was made (counter-bore cut for the rim) to do it that way. I did read later on that you should not full length resize these as that will cause case head separation. Which I had a couple of. I attributed that to the bolt head. When I checked though, that matched the rifle. So, I was a little stumped.

Anyhow, it went down the road as I was in the process of moving to Idaho. It's worth probably a lot more than I got for it. And, I miss shooting it. I would be a lot more fun now that I know more about how to reload it. One other thing I was kind of frustrated with was the inability to get 174 gr. FMJ bullets.
 

Danger Mouse

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I had to say that owning one and reloading for it, sure made me think it was headspaced more like a rimless, which is off the shoulder. So, then I reloaded for other rimmed cases and belted cases and understood that the case should have been headspaced off the rim. But, it sure didn't seem that the rifle was made (counter-bore cut for the rim) to do it that way. I did read later on that you should not full length resize these as that will cause case head separation. Which I had a couple of. I attributed that to the bolt head. When I checked though, that matched the rifle. So, I was a little stumped.

Anyhow, it went down the road as I was in the process of moving to Idaho. It's worth probably a lot more than I got for it. And, I miss shooting it. I would be a lot more fun now that I know more about how to reload it. One other thing I was kind of frustrated with was the inability to get 174 gr. FMJ bullets.

Hornady does them. I've switched to Sierra 180 gr now though. A big variance in seating depth between different projectiles I found.
 
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sandwarrior

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Hornady does them. I've switched to Sierra 180 gr now though. A big variance in seating depth between different projectiles I found.
Come to think of it, that's what I did use, Hornady 174's. I was able to get some British surplus and those are the 174's I could never get to reload with. And, now that I remember a little better, I didn't sell it until I got to Idaho. Still, for what I got it for, it was a cheap fun gun to shoot.