Long-form journalism articles

Maggot

Philo-Sophia Fidelis et veritas
Jul 27, 2007
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Charlottesville, Virginia
#3
Good topic but my last semester at college I wanted to see how hard I could push myself academically. I took (against everyone's advice) 3 upper level philosophy courses, 1 senior seminar open only to philosophy majors, and one philosophy grad course. Since then Ive really only read when necessary.
 
Likes: thejeep

ArmyJerry

Staff Sergeant
Nov 22, 2012
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#4
Birkenstock wearing nerd you are.

Good topic but my last semester at college I wanted to see how hard I could push myself academically. I took (against everyone's advice) 3 upper level philosophy courses, 1 senior seminar open only to philosophy majors, and one philosophy grad course. Since then Ive really only read when necessary.
 
Mar 27, 2014
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Mpls, MN
#5
...Ive really only read when necessary.
I'm no college graduate, but I hear ya. I have a really hard time being motivated enough to make it through books.

That said, I HATE reactionary journalism, which is 99% of what I come across in print media. Long-form journalism seems to be the exception to the rule, hence my veiled plea for more of it.
 
Likes: Alphatreedog
#8
Most "journalism" is grossly inaccurate and biased.

And the "analysis" typically consists of repitition of assumptions as conclusions.
Another reason I like Ham Radio. I can normally get the truth from a local Ham operator w/o the media or state spin. Talking to folks across the ponds who were there or lived it is most always different than the internet spin ( I don't allow TV in the home). Some of the shit from the media about the Middle East is so far out of wack with what really happened it's nothing more the applied brain washing.
 

Bender

Something witty here
Feb 12, 2014
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Cheyenne WY.
#12
I read the article, I agree with 80% of it, but it was seasoned with virtue signaling and a hint of gun control. He seems like a cool guy though, and a good cop.
 
Mar 27, 2014
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#13
The Gun Guru of YouTube
John Correia wants you to prepare for the worst day of your life.




Someday John Correia will meet Jesus. As an ordained pastor, he has thought about how their first conversation will go. That is why he keeps his Heckler & Koch VP9 loaded with a 9-mm magazine in pristine condition. “You’re only going to draw a gun on the worst day of your life,” Correia told me. “You want to make sure the equipment works. I treat these mags like babies.” If he drops one and dents it, he never carries it again. “I don’t want Jesus to look at me and go, ‘How come you didn’t test your equipment, dummy?’ ” Better to be shot dead in a fair fight. “At the very least I want him to say, ‘He smoked you! He was better than you!’ And I’ll say, ‘Yes, Lord, I got smoked.’ ” ...
 
Mar 27, 2014
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Mpls, MN
#14
The Rise of Fame: An Historical Content Analysis

Researchers at UCLA looked at the most popular television shows marketed to young people, from 1967 through 2007. They studied what the shows were teaching about what is important and what is valuable. They found great consistency from 1967 through 1997, whether it was The Andy Griffith Show in 1967 or Sabrina the Teenage Witch in 1997. For those 30 years, what was important – as communicated by the most popular TV shows – was being a good person, being kind to others. Being famous was not important: It ranked at or near the bottom of 16 different parameters from 1967 through 1997. But between 1997 and 2007, American culture flipped: Being famous went from being the least-important thing to being the most important. Between 1997 and 2007, being kind to others went from being the most-important thing (#1 out of 16) to being much-less-important (#11 out of 16).


Credit to both of these links goes to Greg Ellifritz and his Weekend Knowledge Dump
 
Likes: ArmyJerry
Jan 28, 2011
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GA
#15
Good topic but my last semester at college I wanted to see how hard I could push myself academically. I took (against everyone's advice) 3 upper level philosophy courses, 1 senior seminar open only to philosophy majors, and one philosophy grad course. Since then Ive really only read when necessary.
I did a similar exercise... the system wouldn't let me register for as many hours as I wanted to take so I had to request permission. Permission was granted for "over-enrollment". System still wouldn't let me register for all that I wanted so I went to see them in person. They said I was cleared for 24 hours. I said 24 hours is for faggots. I got three blank stares from the other side of the counter for a few minutes. Wound up with 27 hours of pure sciences and math, and a 4.0.

Of course no one gives a shit and it has earned me $0. I just wanted to see if I could do it.
 
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Jan 28, 2011
2,691
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GA
#16
What have you enjoyed reading this week?

I appreciated this story a lot. Wish he was my uncle.

The Spy Who Came Home
Why an expert in counterterrorism became a beat cop.




8 years ago I had a subscription to The New Yorker. My mother still has a subscription, and 95% of the stories no longer interest me.
I appreciate the story and I can only wish we had more cops like him. That the New Yorker would present (allow) such a nuanced story on policing is a rare bright spot.

How such men hold onto a laudable idealism for so long I don't know, but I am impressed. I don't like the outlook it gives me but I am so thoroughly encrusted with pessimism that I see his efforts akin to bailing out an oil tanker with a tea cup when we need a diesel powered bilge pump. At the end of the day I hope he, and others who follow this calling, are brilliantly successful and I am very wrong.
 
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pmclaine

Gunny Sergeant
Nov 6, 2011
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MA
#18
But this guy and his comrades can do it better. Pick a side.



Spencer is a rider, I think he has a Triumph.

With the amount of riding you do whats it going to be like when you and he are on the side trail somewhere and He says "I was in the Army too!"

Man to be a fly.......
 
Mar 27, 2014
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Mpls, MN
#21
Violent crime is like infectious disease – and we know how to stop it spreading

Headlines scream about “epidemics” of shootings and stabbings – but what if we took that literally? From Chicago to Glasgow, treating violence as a public health problem has produced great results.

By Samira Shackle

Usually, facial trauma doesn’t kill you, but it can cause significant disfigurement. Working as a maxillofacial surgeon in Glasgow in the early 2000s, Christine Goodall treated hundreds, if not thousands, of patients with injuries to the neck, face, head and jaw.

One young man came into the hospital in the middle of the night, with a knife wound across his face. Goodall dreaded the morning ward round the next day, when she would have to tell him that it would be impossible to reduce the appearance of the scar. But his reaction surprised her. “He was very offhand about it,” she says. “Some of his friends came to see him later that afternoon and I realised why it wasn’t going to be a problem for him – because they all had one. He’d just joined the club.” The incident has stayed with her, an indication of how bad the situation in her city had become.

In 2005, the United Nations published a report declaring Scotland the most violent country in the developed world. The same year, a study by the World Health Organization (WHO) of crime figures in 21 European countries showed that Glasgow was the “murder capital” of Europe. More than 1,000 people a year required treatment for facial trauma alone, many of them as the result of violence.
https://mosaicscience.com/story/vio...-glasgow-gang-epidemic-gun-health-prevention/
 
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