Loctite or grease on Rifle Length buffer tube?

Len5E1

New Hide Member
May 3, 2018
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#1
I find a lot of varying information on this subject. Buttoning up my AR10 build and ready to go break it in but I still need to torque on the rifle length buffer tube. I see various torque specs and some people using locktite or aeroshell or neither. Is there a general consensus on what works good?
 

lash

Swamp Rat
Sep 28, 2012
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#3
Okay, so educate me a bit. Not knowing what Aeroshell is, I looked it up. Apparently Aeroshell is a complete line of lubricants including light oils, gear oils and greases. So which product is it that you are using?
 

Waorani

Back to the Island
Feb 14, 2017
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#5
Yep that's it. No castle nut on rifle tube. Lube can't hurt but I've always put buffer tubes on dry or maybe a little light oil wipe with no issues. I certainly wouldn't use locktite unless there was no chance I'd ever want to remove. And then I still wouldn't use it.
 
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GH41

Sergeant
Mar 18, 2014
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#7
For a rifle receiver extension I wouldn't use AreoShell unless I planned on swimming in salt water with the rifle but I wouldn't have a problem using a drop of BLUE LocTite. Anytime you mention LocTite the ignorant come out of the woodwork as witnessed in this thread.
 
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whatsupdoc

Duck season
Dec 12, 2017
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Long Island NY
#8
The M16A2 manual states use molybdenum disulfide grease on the threads and torque the tube to 35-39 FT LBS.
Dont see a reason using that specification would cause you issue on a AR10
 
Likes: shoobe01
Feb 14, 2017
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#9
I've always screwed them in tight. Then tighten a bit more. Then they stay right where I left them.

Sometimes life is simpler than we make it...
 

Len5E1

New Hide Member
May 3, 2018
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#11
Thanks for the replies guys. As one person noticed, this is rifle length so no castle nut. A local gunsmith said what some of you did, just tighten it with a wrench nice and snug and dont give it any thought. I'm using a JP silent capture spring so it can be removed as well as the PRS stock without touching the tube. So the only reason I would ever have to replace the tube is if something happened to it or I wanted to convert to a carbine or something. I think dry might be best, the local smith mentioned loctite not being needed because it's not going to go anywhere even if I wanted it to after a few rounds. So the only decision I need to make is if I should do a very light aeroshell or not, but I don't think I can go wrong either way and I'm leaning towards the dry method since removing the tube won't be of any concern to me any time soon.
 

Xander3Zero

Just a normal dude.
Aug 10, 2017
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Rhode Island
#12
There is almost no reason to ever assembled a threaded connection without any type of anti-seize/lube/threadlocker on the threads. Every application will benefit from something different, but there's almost no application where you specifically want dry thread-to-thread contact. In my profession, almost every threaded connection uses threadlocker (blue/red) or anti-seize (usually molykote p-37). Threadlocker is used on semi-permanent/permanent joints where we want to prevent the threads from backing out due to use/vibration/shock, and anti-seize is used for joints where maintenance procedures dictate frequent removal or where the threads are used for adjustment (i.e. power screw). In either case, the threadlocker or anti-seize will provide a protective film for the male/female threads, and serve as a lubricant to help achieve a proper torque.

In this case I would use blue loctite as some others have mentioned. A few properly applied drops of blue loctite should not give you any sort of trouble removing the buffer tube in the future. I usually find that blue-loctited joints are actually easier to remove/disassemble than a dry connection because the loctite will prevent corrosion and better maintain the torque/preload of the joint over time and use.
 
Jul 31, 2017
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#13
usually oil collecting around my buffer tube and threads. whats the point having any type of grease or threadlocker always going to be soaked
 

redneckbmxer24

Gunny Sergeant
Jan 15, 2005
5,793
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VA
#14
I’ve had them loosen from just tightening. I clean up both surfaces and apply some blue loctite and let it cure overnight before adding any lube to that area of the gun. Blue loctite is plenty since that area doesn’t see a lot of heat.

It’s always funny when people act like you can’t get sometime apart once you loctite it. 20 seconds or so of a heat gun on low is all it takes for a buffer tube with blue loctite to come right off as easily as it went on. I loctite almost every threaded part on a gun and I don’t have shit loosening up, and I’ve never had a problem getting anything apart either.
 
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Waorani

Back to the Island
Feb 14, 2017
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#16
I don't think anyone ever said you couldn't get it off if you use a thread locker. Just don't see the need for it when putting an extension tube on.
 

Xander3Zero

Just a normal dude.
Aug 10, 2017
424
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Rhode Island
#17
Loctite - provides thread lubrication, corrosion protection, prevents threads from backing out or coming loose during use/vibration/recoil

Anti-seize - provides thread lubrication, corrosion protection, prevents threads from seizing

Neither - dry thread contact, no corrosion protection, prone to backing out, prone to seizing (obviously won't back out and seize)

I see two good choices, and one poor choice, but people are entitled to make their own decisions!
 

redneckbmxer24

Gunny Sergeant
Jan 15, 2005
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#18
I don't think anyone ever said you couldn't get it off if you use a thread locker. Just don't see the need for it when putting an extension tube on.
Install an a rifle buffer tube with just some grease or anti seize and run a couple thousand rounds through it and let me know how you fair. Unless you're severely over torquing it, it will most likely be loose. I've experienced them loosening which is why I loctite them.

Why do you think any builder that has a clue as well as any quality manufacturer stake castle nuts that have the same torque spec? Because they will come loose if you don't.

There's no good reason NOT to use thread locker in almost any application.
 
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Waorani

Back to the Island
Feb 14, 2017
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Auburn, AL
#19
You can weld it on for all I care. Personally, dozens of ARs over many years, in all calibers, rifle/carbine, factory/self built and not one has ever had thread locker, come loose, suffered corrosion or seized and couldn't be removed.
 

Strykervet

Gunny Sergeant
Jun 5, 2011
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#20
I just use anti seize
It's either that or white grease, wanna say white grease, that's in the M16A1 armory manual.

But after seeing how the SF gunsmith (not an armorer) assembled 'em I'd say it really doesn't matter, and I'm positive each of you puts more detail into than he did so I wouldn't worry too much about it if he doesn't. You do wanna use grease between steel and aluminum though. Or anti seize.

Not a big fan of loctiting aluminum to aluminum and never had a fixed stock or a staked carbine stock come loose anyway. The bolt in the rear of the fixed stock and the keyed portion that fits into the lower prevents it from backing out. Most of mine just get a drop of CLP or TW25B if it's around.

There is a non hardening Loctite too, green I think (careful, one brand uses green as tougher than red). But snot would probably work just as well.
 
Nov 17, 2011
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#21
It's either that or white grease, wanna say white grease, that's in the M16A1 armory manual.

But after seeing how the SF gunsmith (not an armorer) assembled 'em I'd say it really doesn't matter, and I'm positive each of you puts more detail into than he did so I wouldn't worry too much about it if he doesn't. You do wanna use grease between steel and aluminum though. Or anti seize.

Not a big fan of loctiting aluminum to aluminum and never had a fixed stock or a staked carbine stock come loose anyway. The bolt in the rear of the fixed stock and the keyed portion that fits into the lower prevents it from backing out. Most of mine just get a drop of CLP or TW25B if it's around.

There is a non hardening Loctite too, green I think (careful, one brand uses green as tougher than red). But snot would probably work just as well.
loctite green is high strength bearing adhesive....its not something youd ever wanna use on screws......you have to heat it with a blowtorch to remove it.

but yeah.....frankly it doesnt really matter much one way or the other what you use......dry, grease, oil, antiseize.....youre not going to notice a difference.
 
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