Left to right movement in my Rockchucker handle

va_connoisseur

Private
Minuteman
Jun 28, 2018
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Hi Horde. Here’s my issue. I have a decades old RCBS Rockchucker 2. When the press is in the up position, there is significant play in the handle. With little to no effort, the handle moves approximately .5” left or right. This movement is translated into the ram/shell holder, as they move as well. Not as much but enough that it is easy to detect visually.

I checked RCBS’s site and the warranty is only for the original owner, I’m the second owner. But is this even fixable. Should I just regulate it to depriming duty and buy another press? Or is this movement normal?
 

Milo 2.5

The Dalai Lama of the Reload
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Aug 7, 2014
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My own opinion, I had an older RC II, it was solid, not much slop. I bought a Big Boss II, within 2 yrs it was worn bad, wobble like yours. I gave it away, then I got into a coax, floating die station, floating shell holder system, it self aligns.
On your press, the shellholder itself is where the forgiveness is, if it is magnified by some ram slop, I can't see where it hurts anything. As long as the die is inline with what needs done, the ram is just the delivery system, once case is in the die, it no longer matters.
On that warranty, I'd make a 2nd call, sometimes reps have differing interpretations of policies, RCBS stands behind decades old products if they have replacement parts.
 

patriot07

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Oct 17, 2017
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I agree that I'd call RCBS customer service. I had some rusting issues with my new rock chucker last year and they gave me some suggestions and offered a couple of replacement parts. I told them I'd try the suggestions first and call back if I couldn't deal with the cause of the issue. After doing what they said, the issue improved a ton and I didn't need to call back at all. I don't think the rusting was their fault or even caused by design or material/worksmanship issues, but they were still going to help. You never know.