Iron Sights and the M39

huntmaster99

New Hide Member
Oct 29, 2018
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#1
I have a Finnish M39 and im looking to hopefully make it a vintage hunting gun or at least a rifle that shoots well and looks great. My problem is the iron sights, they can only be adjusted for windage and not elevation. I know you could use the rear sight and make that taller but thats not a really practical option or precise. I shoot the Lapua D166 200 gr and Sierra GK 180 soft points. I absolutly refuse to put a scope on it for authenticity sake. So if anyone has alot experience with fiddling with iron sights or has other advice I would love to hear it.

Huntmaster99
 

Ledzep

Chancellor
Jun 9, 2009
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Black Hills
#2
It depends on which way it needs to go, and exactly what you're expecting out of it.

I'm assuming you just want a 100yd zero and don't intend to adjust for longer range shots (200+yd).

In this case, if the rifle is hitting high, you can either have a new front blade made (or find one online maybe, that is taller than your existing one), or grind the bottom of the "slider" on the rear sight.

If the rifle is hitting low, you can slide the adjuster to a higher yardage, put a shim under the rear sight, or grind/file the top of the front post down.

Unfortunately most European rifles of the era don't allow for precise windage and elevation adjustment like the 1903, M1 garand, etc...
 

huntmaster99

New Hide Member
Oct 29, 2018
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#4
I have an M39 Finn that shoots lights out. It's my backup deer rifle......unless I take my K98......or my 03...
What ammunition are you using, i currently hand load and have the D166 projectile but i dont know what the velocity of the original ammunition was.
 

huntmaster99

New Hide Member
Oct 29, 2018
3
0
1
#5
It depends on which way it needs to go, and exactly what you're expecting out of it.

I'm assuming you just want a 100yd zero and don't intend to adjust for longer range shots (200+yd).

In this case, if the rifle is hitting high, you can either have a new front blade made (or find one online maybe, that is taller than your existing one), or grind the bottom of the "slider" on the rear sight.

If the rifle is hitting low, you can slide the adjuster to a higher yardage, put a shim under the rear sight, or grind/file the top of the front post down.

Unfortunately most European rifles of the era don't allow for precise windage and elevation adjustment like the 1903, M1 garand, etc...
This is something totally new to me. While they were manufactured to a high quality, im suprised that only the Americans had the idea of actually hitting the target at close-ish range. Im assuming this is a byproduct of WW1 experience. Maybe it will just be a good looking rifle that shoots decently, ill probably leave the precision shooting to my Bergara b14 hmr in 6.5 creed
 

Ledzep

Chancellor
Jun 9, 2009
1,558
301
83
Black Hills
#6
Yeah it's interesting for sure. I think a lot of times it's anyone's guess where these old rifles hit with non-freefloating wooden stocks and handguards. A lot of variation even with a change in humidity or temperature. Could be that the fibers compress over time in the bedding area which causes more upward pressure on the muzzle end of the barrel, because they do most of the time hit higher than the sights indicate, even with correct period ammunition.
 

Skookum

Flattus Domini
May 6, 2017
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#7
This is something totally new to me. While they were manufactured to a high quality, im suprised that only the Americans had the idea of actually hitting the target at close-ish range. Im assuming this is a byproduct of WW1 experience. Maybe it will just be a good looking rifle that shoots decently, ill probably leave the precision shooting to my Bergara b14 hmr in 6.5 creed
European battle rifles hit high on purpose. The training philosophy was different overseas. Most of these rifles have what amounts to a 300m-400m battle sight zero.

Troops were taught to aim either at the belt or crotch. That way, as the bullets rises and falls through the line of sight, they maximize the danger space on a target the size of a man's torso. It is just the "maximum point blank range" concept in the extreme.

Point of aim, Point of impact, precision rifle fire for the simple foot soldier was a uniquely American concept at the time.